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J.O.

Spitfire: The Plane that Saved the World

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For the Netflix subscribers out there, they recently posted a documentary called “Spitfire: The Plane that Saved the World”. I highly recommend it. The pilots personal stories were as important to the story as the aircraft itself.

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4 hours ago, J.O. said:

For the Netflix subscribers out there, they recently posted a documentary called “Spitfire: The Plane that Saved the World”. I highly recommend it. The pilots personal stories were as important to the story as the aircraft itself.

Am happy to say my Dad was one of 'em, albeit towards the end of the war vice the Battle of Britain.

 

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There are only two aircraft I wish that I had the opportunity to fly.....;

the Spitfire, and 

the F-86

Too young for the Spitfire and the RCAF was scrapping the F-86 the year I was awarded my wings ?..

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Great documentary. Years ago when I was a flight instructor,  I had the pleasure of doing some annual refresher training with a club member who had his own v tail and who flew Spits in WWII. He told stories the whole time while demonstrating 1G aeros and when another aircraft checked in on the practise area frequency he engaged me in a contest to see who could see the hun first. The whole flight was operated at 25 squared; I could tell he wished more out of what the ol' Bonanza could give him. One of my most memorable hours spent in an aircraft.

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I enjoyed the documentary as well. The title is a bit of an overstatement (P51 and P47 chaps might quarrel a bit) but it was the right plane at the right time for Britain. But I was puzzled about a couple of things. 1- The Hurricane was, as usual, under represented in any discussion of the Battle of Britain.  They were in greater numbers and did a lot of the heavy lifting in spite of being seriously out performed. 2- A lot of the photos in the documentary that were supposed to be of the Spit were actually of the Hurricane. You can tell by the exhaust and gear geometry. Early Spits did look somewhat similar but were clearly different machines. These are trifles in an otherwise excellent program. The interviews gave a unique view of the men and machines.

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At YQQ last August, flown by Dave Hadfield.

The restoration of this aircraft is a superb job. It probably looks better than when it was built. He did a couple of demos and was joined by another restored Spitfire from Seattle at the hangar on the base where they had a fund raiser dinner. The whole thing was really well done.

1N6A0010-4.jpg

DSCF5547-Edit-Edit.jpg

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10 hours ago, Southshore said:

I enjoyed the documentary as well. The title is a bit of an overstatement (P51 and P47 chaps might quarrel a bit) but it was the right plane at the right time for Britain. But I was puzzled about a couple of things. 1- The Hurricane was, as usual, under represented in any discussion of the Battle of Britain.  They were in greater numbers and did a lot of the heavy lifting in spite of being seriously out performed. 2- A lot of the photos in the documentary that were supposed to be of the Spit were actually of the Hurricane. You can tell by the exhaust and gear geometry. Early Spits did look somewhat similar but were clearly different machines. These are trifles in an otherwise excellent program. The interviews gave a unique view of the men and machines.

Thank you for pointing this out. I also really enjoyed the documentary but the Hurricane was given short shrift.

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I thought it was a little heavy on the CGI, although there was plenty of ‘real’ footage as well. 

I really enjoyed  the interviews and it was a bonus for them to acknowledge the women ferry pilots and factory workers.

 

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Spitfire pilots return to Goodwood after round-the-world trip

Two British pilots have touched down on home soil, after flying around the world in a restored chrome Spitfire.

Steve Brooks, 58, from Burford, Oxfordshire, and Matt Jones, 45, from Exeter, took four months to circumnavigate the globe in the first trip of its kind in a Spitfire.

They stopped off in 100 locations, across 30 countries.

The project, called Silver Spitfire - The Longest Flight, started and finished at Goodwood Aerodrome, the base of Boultbee Flight Academy, the first-ever school for Spitfire pilots, in West Sussex.

'the complete article and video can be viewed at  https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-england-sussex-50679671/spitfire-pilots-return-to-goodwood-after-round-the-world-trip

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2 hours ago, Marshall said:

Two British pilots have touched down on home soil, after flying around the world in a restored chrome Spitfire.

That must have been the reason it took so long,,,,,,,to do the flight....A chrome spitfire would be pretty heavy and not get good gas mileage....4322.gif

 

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4 hours ago, Kip Powick said:

 

That must have been the reason it took so long,,,,,,,to do the flight....A chrome spitfire would be pretty heavy and not get good gas mileage....4322.gif

 

Still faster than a Herc.  ?

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2 hours ago, Marshall said:

Still faster than a Herc.  ?

Really ?? You think it would take that long to go around the world in that aluminum overcast, 4 engine turbo prop???.. Done it four times  and even with stops to drop off stuff at embassy's we were around 14 days .

Now if you are talking just about cruise speed at altitude  you are still wrong..Spitfire is about 220mph  and the C-130 is  about 375 mph

If you are talking max level speed, max power at 1000 feet  above ground .......the Spitfire is close to 437 mph and the C-130 is  365 mph and of course both could get a little more speed in a dive but both have a limiting IAS   due to air frame etc.

If you are talking about comfort, hot meals, the ability to get up and walk around, bathroom facilities....well you can  figure it out 

If you are talking "thrill" to drive...never flown the "Spit" but I would assume it would be more of a thrill than the C-130.... for a few days..... but the range issue ???

 

I had a couple of C-130 trainees in Cold Lake and naturally we went to Happy Hour and we had all the jet jocks, (F-18 ) ,razzing us in good humor and one guy asked one of my students  if it was true that the C130  was named because of max speed of 130 kts. The student thought for a moment and said...I'm new on the Herc but I think the last time we saw 130 kts was on final at Singapore..oh wait, I think it was Hong Kong".."I stepped in and added "actually it was in Hawaii and Sydney Australia --- I guess you guys have never been there because I hear you have a shorter string on your "whiz-bang".????..good times and  friendly rivalry 5137.gif

Cancel  baZINGaa  4309.gif5188.gif

Edited by Kip Powick
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10 hours ago, Kip Powick said:

Really ?? You think it would take that long to go around the world in that aluminum overcast, 4 engine turbo prop???.. Done it four times  and even with stops to drop off stuff at embassy's we were around 14 days .

Now if you are talking just about cruise speed at altitude  you are still wrong..Spitfire is about 220mph  and the C-130 is  about 375 mph

If you are talking max level speed, max power at 1000 feet  above ground .......the Spitfire is close to 437 mph and the C-130 is  365 mph and of course both could get a little more speed in a dive but both have a limiting IAS   due to air frame etc.

If you are talking about comfort, hot meals, the ability to get up and walk around, bathroom facilities....well you can  figure it out 

If you are talking "thrill" to drive...never flown the "Spit" but I would assume it would be more of a thrill than the C-130.... for a few days..... but the range issue ???

 

I had a couple of C-130 trainees in Cold Lake and naturally we went to Happy Hour and we had all the jet jocks, (F-18 ) ,razzing us in good humor and one guy asked one of my students  if it was true that the C130  was named because of max speed of 130 kts. The student thought for a moment and said...I'm new on the Herc but I think the last time we saw 130 kts was on final at Singapore..oh wait, I think it was Hong Kong".."I stepped in and added "actually it was in Hawaii and Sydney Australia --- I guess you guys have never been there because I hear you have a shorter string on your "whiz-bang".????..good times and  friendly rivalry 5137.gif

Cancel  baZINGaa  4309.gif5188.gif

I should know better than to go fishing..... ?    https://www.silverspitfire.com/about/spitfire-history/

283 mph
 
3171 resulted in level speeds of 283 mph at sea level and 354 mph at 18,900 feet with the Merlin engine operating at 6.25 lbs/sq.in., 3000 rpm. For comparison, Spitfire Mk. I R.

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51 minutes ago, Marshall said:

I should know better than to go fishing..... ?    https://www.silverspitfire.com/about/spitfire-history/

283 mph
 
3171 resulted in level speeds of 283 mph at sea level and 354 mph at 18,900 feet with the Merlin engine operating at 6.25 lbs/sq.in., 3000 rpm. For comparison, Spitfire Mk. I R.

 

Yup, the variance in speeds at altitude with the Spitfire  depends on MK number and whether a super charger was installed..

 

Interesting link....I would imagine you saw all the photos of people signing the aircraft with the Magic Marker. DND used to use those markers and the FE on a C130 and Cosmo(CV580) was supposed to go out and circle any dents on the airframe and in particular the underside of the Cosmo (CV580) wings after a landing on gravel. The technique with the Cosmo was to never go into "reverse" on gravel unless an emergency because the vortices would suck up gravel and dent the underside of the wings and engine nacelles. The C-130 with higher mounted engines was not much of a problem...

It was found that the reaction between the Magic Markers and the aluminum was  corrosive in nature  and Magic Markers were banned.

I would imagine the silver Spitfire was wiped down after the ceremony prior to departure on their round the world adventure...

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