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Marshall

Marching On, Under a minority Government

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17 minutes ago, boestar said:

Just as it did when T2 Took over.  Yes he has gone a bit crazy but believe it or not sometimes you need to spend money to make money.

 

Oh, yeah, Good old JT will spend us into prosperity.  What nonsense.  Maybe we should encourage him to really double down on the deficits so we gets all the prosperity that much quicker.

Yes, the grammar is intentional - it's a joke

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24 minutes ago, boestar said:

Yes he has gone a bit crazy but believe it or not sometimes you need to spend money to make money.

And this was in a relative stable economic climate.....I shudder to think what he would do if a recession comes...Might as well put a For Sale sign on the front door 

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The primary difference in Harper/Flaherty is that they did not build in the deficit with programs that would continue on throwing money at the problem.  Instead it was one time shot-in-the-arm stuff that did not carry through to the next cycle.

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https://www.thebeaverton.com/2019/11/see-how-easy-that-was-says-may-to-scheer-after-quitting/

“See how easy that was?” says May to Scheer after quitting

OTTAWA – Shortly after resigning as leader of the Green Party this morning Elizabeth May called current Conservative leader Andrew Scheer to tell him it wasn’t all that hard.

“You don’t have to like, make a whole thing about it,” said May to Scheer. “You can just read the room and then walk away with your dignity intact.”

“It doesn’t even take very long! Just one quick phone call and, boom, you’re no longer holding your party back from any chance of forming government,” she added.

Sources say May felt the need to call Scheer after observing his behaviour since the election, in which it has appeared that he genuinely does not know he could just resign, rather than continually be humiliated by anonymous leaks telling the press what a terrible leader he was, and public comments from rivals equating him to the world’s worst hockey player.

“You’ll feel so free once it’s over Andrew. So free. Hush now. Hush. Shhhhhh. It’s okay. I’m here,” said May as audible sobs could be heard on the other end of the line.

At press time Andrew Scheer was pretty sure that if he stays on and doesn’t change a thing, everything would be fine.

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At least say it’s Fake News When you post.

“ The Beaverton is a primarily online Canadian news satire publication, based in TorontoMontreal and Whitehorse.[1] It features news stories, editorials, vox populi and other formats (such as university reviews) whose structure and layout mirror those of conventional newspapers but whose content is contorted to make humorous commentary on Canadian and world issues.”

 

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4 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

At least say it’s Fake News When you post.

“ The Beaverton is a primarily online Canadian news satire publication, based in TorontoMontreal and Whitehorse.[1] It features news stories, editorials, vox populi and other formats (such as university reviews) whose structure and layout mirror those of conventional newspapers but whose content is contorted to make humorous commentary on Canadian and world issues.”

 

If you thought it was real, you must be a conservative 🤣

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1 hour ago, deicer said:

If Jesus Came Back.jpg


And rightly so....it’s all a myth anyhow......

 

ABC57512-9234-4374-9DD4-79E1DD2B9A48.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee

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23 hours ago, Jaydee said:

At least say it’s Fake News When you post.

“ The Beaverton is a primarily online Canadian news satire publication, based in TorontoMontreal and Whitehorse.[1] It features news stories, editorials, vox populi and other formats (such as university reviews) whose structure and layout mirror those of conventional newspapers but whose content is contorted to make humorous commentary on Canadian and world issues.”

 

if you didn't know that you werent paying attention

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1 hour ago, boestar said:

if you didn't know that you werent paying attention

Oh I knew exactly what is was. I’ve been down the road on this site before with him. But there are probably a lot of people that didn’t . And that’s my point.

Deicer is always ranting about sources then he posts something like this with no disclaimer. If you are going to knowingly post from a Fake news site, at least leave a disclaimer for the less informed readers.

Edited by Jaydee

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Just now, Jaydee said:

Oh I knew exactly what is was. I’ve been down the road on this site before with him. But there are probably a lot of people that didn’t . And that’s my point.

Deicer is always ranting about sources then he posts something like this with no disclaimer. If you are going to knowingly post from a Fake news site, at least leave a disclaimer.

Thank you Oh Voice of Reason. 

BTW, did you always post disclaimers on all of your Trudeau hate posts?

 

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6 minutes ago, deicer said:

Thank you Oh Voice of Reason. 

BTW, did you always post disclaimers on all of your Trudeau hate posts?

 

Not on memes, but when it is from a news source I always post the link.

Edited by Jaydee
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Conservative policy that the Liberals will now have to pay for:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/veterans-affairs-pension-disability-1.4890117

Ottawa short-changed more than 270,000 veterans on pensions, disability payments

Accounting error is believed to have cost veterans $165M between 2002-2010

 
murray-brewster.jpg
Murray Brewster · CBC News · Posted: Nov 05, 2018 10:03 AM ET | Last Updated: November 5, 2018
 
remembrance-day-ottawa.jpg
Veterans march to Remembrance Day ceremonies at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on Nov. 11, 2015. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)
1119
comments

More than 270,000 ex-soldiers were short-changed by Veterans Affairs Canada for over eight years because of an accounting error worth at least $165 million, CBC News has learned.

The mistake was uncovered by the veterans ombudsman's office, which has worked with the federal department for over a year to get it to confirm the mistake and make amends.

 

A written statement from Veterans Affairs Minister Seamus O'Regan confirmed a retroactive compensation program is in the works — but the affected veterans will have to wait up to two years to get their money.

"We will ensure those affected receive the compensation to which they are entitled," O'Regan said. "At this stage, given the number of individuals affected, we expect to issue payments by 2020. We will share more information with those affected as it becomes available."

The minister thanked the ombudsman, Guy Parent, for uncovering the error.

"Our interest is that veterans and their families are treated fairly," said Parent in an interview Monday with CBC News.

 
guy-parent-20131204.jpg
Canadian Veterans Ombudsman Guy Parent says many of the veterans short-changed by Ottawa are — or were — living on low incomes. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

 

The error was made in the monthly indexing calculation on disability awards and pensions and is believed to have started as far back as 2002.

The department didn't factor in the basic provincial tax credit for individuals. That led to lower monthly payments for 272,000 veterans — a significant number of them Second World War and Korean War veterans.

As many as 175,000 of them have since died, leaving the federal government with a legal mess to untangle related to their estates.

"It's going to be a challenge," Parent said.

Depending upon individual circumstances, the ombudsman said, the error would have deprived veterans of between $50 and $2,000 during the timeframe.

"Those war veterans that are in low income and that receive the war allowance ... I mean, two thousand dollars is almost the equivalent of a monthly payment for them," the ombudsman said. "It is significant for them."

 

The error ran unchecked from 2002 to 2010, according to internal department numbers analyzed by the ombudsman's staff.

In 2011, Veterans Affairs inexplicably resumed using the correct calculation.

The department did not, however, make any move to reimburse veterans for the lost income, which would have — in the worst cases — amounted to a few hundred dollars per month.

"We did not look really look at causes ... We did not look at the how or the why," said Parent. "We discovered the error. They acknowledged it and now our interest is in fairness and making sure they are repaid and the money goes back into veterans' pockets."

Parent said it is up to Veterans Affairs to explain why the error took place, when it was spotted and why nothing was done about it until the ombudsman stepped in.

Conservative defence critic James Bezan was caught off guard by the news and claimed two former veterans ministers, who served through the time when the mistake was spotted, knew nothing about it.

"They were never, ever briefed on this," said Bezan, who demanded more details on the Liberal government's compensation plan. 

Sean Bruyea, a veterans advocate and long-time critic of the department, said he wonders what would have happened had the ombudsman not dug into the file and whether the department was trying to hide its mistake.

"They were waiting for someone to hopefully not find this information," he said. "And when it was found, the fact that they're not being agile and responsive to get this solved, paints a picture of a department that's sorely out of touch with how it impacts veterans."

Canada's former top military commander, retired general Rick Hillier, said he is willing to believe the miscalculation was an honest bureaucratic snafu, but he still has questions.

"You do wonder why it took so long to recognize it was an error and why there wasn't some … compensation at the end of it," Hillier said.

Some veterans did end up receiving reimbursement — but inadvertently, and without knowing it. The Liberal government's 2016 budget poured more money into disability awards, and the measure included retroactive payments.

But the ombudsman said the difference was not made up for those who received disability pensions between 2002 and 2010.

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Conservative policy that began under the liberals.....4 years before Harper was elected??    🤨

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12 hours ago, deicer said:

Conservative policy that the Liberals will now have to pay for:

So it started under a LIBERAL government, went unnoticed until a CONSERVATIVE government discovered the error and has STILL gone Uncorrected for the last FOUR years under the Turd...and will take TWO more years under the incompetence of theTurd to rectify...yep...sounds about right....blame it on Harper.  

 

Edited by Jaydee
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And it’s bound to get worse. Deficit theory is pure poppycock. Try and imagine...for one moment.... what will happen when the inevitable downturn/recession happens. Canada  is toast. Thank you Justin.

 

Canada unexpectedly loses 1,800 jobs, widely missing forecasts

The nation lost 16,100 full-time jobs

Analysts in a Reuters poll had forecast a gain of 15,900 jobs in October and an unemployment rate of 5.5 per cent. Wages for permanent employees rose by 4.4 per cent, Statscan said.

Canada lost 16,100 full-time positions last month, but gained 14,300 part-time jobs. The number of self-employed workers in October fell by 27,800.

https://business.financialpost.com/news/economy/canada-loses-1800-jobs-in-october-unemployment-rate-holds-steady-at-5-5?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook#Echobox=1573220775

Edited by Jaydee

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That defining moment when you suddenly realize your country is really fooked !😥😥 .

30% of voters are on their knees right now, praying to their GOD. 
 

“ Those who fail to learn from the mistakes of their predecessors are destined to repeat them.”

5B431E91-2226-4401-B567-9A3C7706400B.jpeg

0F703194-0D74-411B-A3D4-8F9E529A2FD4.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee

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1 hour ago, Jaydee said:

30% of voters are on their knees right now, praying to their GOD. 

Some of the voting statistics are in now and should be a source of concern..... but aren't. 

This is my interpretation based on the numbers I read this morning: It sounds like some 30% of voters will support the base and the attendant narrative no matter what. They vote how they vote and their only argument is conservatives (or Liberals) BAD and only we have the answers. Issues are irrelevant. 

21% vote tactically, in other words AGAINST what they don't like. That doesn't mean they like what they are voting for and once again, issues are irrelevant.

Only 12% of people actually follow the issues and vote accordingly..... political agnostics if you will, they are only interested in good ideas and will support the candidates who have them. This was likely a tough election cycle for them but keep in mind that they don't matter much because they are a dying breed. This years election was conducted the way it was for a reason.... issues didn't matter, answers weren't demanded and so weren't given. 

IMO, the 12% figure is worrisome to me (and should be to everyone else too). It means that political discussion and debate is pretty much worthless now; what we see (even on this forum) is the defence of narratives and that defence now masquerades as discussion. In old school CRM circles this was called "strength of an idea." A dangerous characteristic in aviation and also in democracy and law making because it follows the existing narrative regardless of changing circumstances that have rendered the narrative wrong (or dangerous). 

Consider the story above (veteran pensions), every year (and I mean every single bloody year) something like this is released 3 or 4 days before Remembrance Day and in order to have impact, it always has old guys with medals so the sponser can scream "LOOK WHAT YOU DID". The context is never (and I mean never) about how to fix it, it is always (and I mean always) about who's fault it is. Now, do you think any of this is lost on veterans? Here's a hint, the answer is no; I guess I can only speak for myself here, but I don't care what colour your poppy is either; so stop naming highways the "Highway of Heroes" or some such nonsense..... I don't care; give that deaf WW2 WAG (gunner) some hearing aids.   

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Scheer has been put on notice

 

  • Calgary Herald
  • 8 Nov 2019
  • JOHN IVISON
img?regionKey=tHN9Pi%2buCgEBMszOSB3oQA%3d%3d  

Andrew Scheer presented the facade of party unity when he emerged from a marathon caucus meeting on Wednesday.

“The whole team knows that Conservatives only succeed when they work together and remain united,” he said.

It’s true that the caucus was unified behind the idea that the party’s membership, not its elected members, should hold the leader to account. But that was where consensus ended.

The meeting didn’t last seven hours because MPS were lauding the leader and his team.

There are very real concerns among MPS from Ontario

in particular, that the party will be reduced to a rump in Canada’s largest province, if major changes are not introduced by Scheer — or possibly his successor. The loss of Milton, a riding formerly held by Lisa Raitt, is seen as a harbinger by MPS with commuter belt constituencies who have seen their vote share dip in successive elections since 2011.

Sources said just about every MP took to the microphone and there was widespread dissatisfaction with Scheer’s suggestion, expressed in his press conference, that the problem with the election campaign was simply a failure to communicate. “Sometimes our message didn’t resonate with Canadians,” he told reporters.

One MP said he came out of the meeting less confident that when he went in. “The leader and his team are doubling down and at this early stage there are no signs he’s going to change,” he said.

One recurring complaint from Ontario MPS was that Scheer has surrounded himself with westerners who “reinforce his bad instincts,” in the words of one party insider. That feeling has been aggravated by the election of Alberta MP Tom Kmiec as caucus chair to replace an Ontario MP, David Sweet.

“This could become an existential question for the party going forward,” said one Ontario MP. “It could be distilled down to a western Reform rump.”

Ontario remains the largest source of Conservative MPS with 36 members, compared to Alberta’s 33 MPS. (There are 17 from B.C., 14 from Saskatchewan, seven from Manitoba, 10 from Quebec, three from New Brunswick and one from Nova Scotia).

The prospect is always there for fratricide among the loose confederation of warring tribes that agreed to merge under the Conservative Party of Canada banner in 2004. It seems unlikely that the party could unravel into Reform and Progressive Conservative camps — few present day Tories were active in the legacy parties.

But there is a sense of frustration that Scheer could not persuade voters in Ontario and Quebec that he could live up to the expectations of a mainstream party leader in 2019. That would include embracing the gay community, speaking from the heart on reproductive rights issues and explaining how Canada would fulfil its international obligations on climate change.

One of the few unequivocal statements Scheer made on Wednesday was that as long as he is leader, the Conservative Party will oppose a carbon tax.

One Ontario MP said that he is relaxed about that statement, as long as the leader is clear about other ways of achieving greenhouse gas emission targets.

But the MP acknowledged voters may not believe Scheer whatever he says on the environment because he comes across as not caring about the issue. “It’s a character issue,” he said. “People didn’t know him before. Now they know him but they don’t trust him. He has been less than forthright and transparent, so he’s got his work cut out for him.”

Scheer has been like a puppy chasing its tail. His talking-points-heavy campaign offered little worth voting for and then he wondered why people didn’t elect him prime minister. The lack of ambition shrank the party’s appeal to its base and he failed to make an emotional connection with people where he needed to, particularly in the country’s largest cities.

The sense of those emerging from Wednesday’s meeting is that caucus has put Scheer on notice that he has six months to figure out how to win in Central Canada or the membership will sort it out for him.

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3 hours ago, Jaydee said:

And it’s bound to get worse. Deficit theory is pure poppycock. Try and imagine...for one moment.... what will happen when the inevitable downturn/recession happens. Canada  is toast. Thank you Justin.

 

Canada unexpectedly loses 1,800 jobs, widely missing forecasts

The nation lost 16,100 full-time jobs

Analysts in a Reuters poll had forecast a gain of 15,900 jobs in October and an unemployment rate of 5.5 per cent. Wages for permanent employees rose by 4.4 per cent, Statscan said.

Canada lost 16,100 full-time positions last month, but gained 14,300 part-time jobs. The number of self-employed workers in October fell by 27,800.

https://business.financialpost.com/news/economy/canada-loses-1800-jobs-in-october-unemployment-rate-holds-steady-at-5-5?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook#Echobox=1573220775

The other side of the coin, and the most important thing is the second last line...

https://app.tmxmoney.com/news/cpnews/article?locale=EN&newsid=8jobs1&mobile=false

Craig Wong, The Canadian Press, at 11:11 on November 8, 2019
  •  

OTTAWA - The number of people working in Canada edged lower in October following two months of big gains as the manufacturing and construction sectors lost jobs.

Statistics Canada said Friday the economy lost 1,800 jobs in October, following gains of 54,000 jobs in September and 81,000 in August.

The number of full-time jobs fell by 16,100, offset in part by a gain of 14,300 part-time jobs, while the unemployment rate held steady at 5.5 per cent.

Economists on average expected the economy to add a total of 15,900 jobs and an unemployment rate of 5.5 per cent, according to financial markets data firm Refinitiv.

Scotiabank deputy chief economist Brett House said the October jobs numbers were the weakest since July, but added that one soft month won't have much impact on the Bank of Canada's stance, particularly after the strong gains in the two months that preceded it.

"On details, the mix of full-time and part-time jobs changes was poor," House said.

"But we continued to see strong wage gains, at over twice headline inflation, which reflects the fact that Canadian businesses continue to cite labour shortages as the most important constraint on their growth."

Despite the small decline in the number of jobs, wage growth in October held steady. Average hourly wage growth, year-over-year, for all employees was 4.3 per cent for the month, the same as September.

The manufacturing sector lost 23,000 jobs, mostly in Ontario, while the construction sector lost 21,000. Employment in the "other services" industry also fell by 18,000.

The losses were offset in part by an increase of 20,000 jobs working in public administration and 18,000 in finance, insurance, real estate, rental and leasing.

The jobs report comes after the Bank of Canada's decision late last month to keep its key interest rate on hold at 1.75 per cent.

In making its decision, the central bank said inflation was on target and the domestic economy has held up well in many respects, even though it's feeling the negative effects of slowing global growth.

Josh Nye, senior economist at Royal Bank, said the future direction of the Bank of Canada will depend on the resilience of the Canadian economy, particularly in consumer spending and housing.

"A healthy labour market is key to both and there is little sign of deterioration in today's report with the unemployment rate remaining low and wage growth continuing at a strong pace," Nye said.

Regionally, B.C. added 15,000 jobs, while Newfoundland and Labrador added 2,700 jobs.

The number of self-employed workers in October fell by 27,800, while public sector employees rose by 28,700. The number of private sector employees fell by 2,700.

On a year-over-year basis, employment was up by 443,000, an increase of 2.4 per cent.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 8, 2019.

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So when will Trudeau and Singh be asked tasteless questions about their religion?

 

I think it’s clear to any moderately neutral mind that Andrew Scheer has taken more than his fair share of a mauling since election night. Former party big shots have dumped on him, there have been endless complaints in a compliant press from nameless “sources high in the party” about his performance, and the same press on its own has been very busy on the “can Scheer survive?” meme. The question has been plant-food for the political panels and fertilizer for mischievous politicos.

For what it’s worth (very little) I think his campaign was weak, unaggressive to a fault, gave the Liberals a pass on some very serious issues, was not nearly hard enough on the Trudeau blackface theatricals, and, most significantly, did not make what it needed to make: a national case for Canada’s oil and gas industry.

The press has been very busy on the 'can Scheer survive?' meme

 

Nonetheless, with all that said, the novice leader increased Conservative seats (by 26 — a wholesome gain); took the Liberals down from their majority (20 lost, a notable loss); post-vote owns a whole block of the country; and has a very powerful presence in the House of Commons. No A++ for the leader, but certainly not the string of Ds and Es he’s getting from the Ottawa sages and some of his anonymous “friends.”

Jagmeet Singh by contrast is being toasted, not roasted, for his campaign. Objectively this is strange. Under his leadership the NDP were obliterated in Quebec, lost a massive chunk of seats (went from 39 to 24), and were seen at one point in the campaign as threatened by the Greens. The latter should be seen as a shameful blot on any leader’s record — the Green party really being a toy car, a Tesla-tot, rather than a genuine eight-cylinder political vehicle. Mr. Singh impressed mainly because his performance in the year and a half before the election was almost brilliantly dismal. Any change was necessarily for the better.

Then, there’s Justin Trudeau. He took a sledgehammer to his “woke is me,” “I am the guardian angel of Canada’s diversity and tolerance” image via a triplet of revelations that in his pre-PM days he danced and yodelled in blackface. The prior expulsions of Jody Wilson-Raybould and Jane Philpott left his male-feminist banner limp on the flag post, and his refusal to allow any accounting of the SNC-Lavalin interference — his resistance to accountability — put paid to any idea that his was a “new” politics. In the matter of shutting down inconvenient questions, he out-Chrétiened Chrétien.

 

Who lost the most? A fair argument can be made that it was the Trudeau Liberals. From government to minority, from fresh new leader to just another pol — and let us not neglect that the Bloc is back in force and half of Western Canada is dangerously angry with how it is being treated.

So the question is, why all the drear post-mortems on Scheer, and so few on the leader who birthed the phrase “sunny days.” The Scheer autopsies reached something of a peak moment this week, when after his first post-election caucus, one reporter thought it necessary to inquire into his theological beliefs. She asked if he thought homosexuality was a “sin.” (Scheer is a Catholic, though he does not posit that as an essential element of his candidacy.)

A very odd, and even artful question. I half-expected a followup along the lines of Name the 12 Gifts of the Holy Ghost? What are your views on the Transubstantiation? Now were Mr. Scheer a candidate for Pope (unlikely), or leaving politics for the priesthood (dubious), such questions might even have a point.

In the matter of shutting down inconvenient questions, Trudeau out-Chrétiened Chrétien

 

The point the sin question did have was to continue the line egregiously put out by his Liberal opponents that Scheer was going to “smuggle” his religious views on same-sex marriage and abortion into law should he win the election. It was oppo-politics chaff, and a really cheap brand of that reliably cheap stuff. He rebutted the inane suggestions multiple times on the campaign trail but various supine reporters kept tossing it up, and this post-election catechism was just the most tasteless and ostentatious version of the same sly charge.

To be clear, even the dogs in the street, the very mutts of the alleyways, knew and know that Andrew Scheer was not running for PM to establish a new Catholic Dominion, that he was not some version of a Christian ayatollah plotting to bring Margaret Atwood’s grim fantasy upon Canadian politics.

So why bait him with that faux-concerned question? For good or ill we have for a long time now left the religion of our politicians out of their public performance. We question them on their ethics and integrity without reference to their moments in the Confessional or their private meditations and prayers.

When Justin Trudeau was rightly being tested by the press on his conduct during the SNC-Lavalin affair, did any in the press gallery ask: Mr. Trudeau, as a Catholic do you think your interference with the Justice Department is a sin? As a Catholic do you think your treatment of Vice-Admiral Mark Norman violates the commandment about “bearing false witness?” Even more to the point — As a Catholic how do you justify barring all MPs who oppose abortion (which in your faith really is a sin) from your caucus?

Well, if we’re going to have religious questions put to one leader, let’s put them to them all. What are Mr. Singhs’ private religious views on homosexuality and abortion? This latter is highly unlikely though. For as unspeakable as it may be to mention the obvious here, to question the religion of a person who is not Christian is, under the current progressive ethos, beyond the courage or depravity (take your pick) of any journalist who wishes to remain a journalist.

If we’re going to have religious questions put to one leader, let’s put them to them all

 

And further, when any leader gives a vague non-religious reply, let those who trill from the highest branches of the blasted Twitter tree, as they have with Mr. Scheer, “retweet” (that is the deplorable verb) their evasive replies.

So yes, Scheer is bearing more than his fair share of post-mortem scrutiny. This is not to say — I repeat — he performed well. It is just to ask that if the press wants him to have a stay in the grinder, should it then be preparing for Trudeau’s turn, and Singh’s as well?

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-so-when-will-trudeau-and-singh-be-asked-tasteless-questions-about-their-religion

 

 

 

Edited by Jaydee
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