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AME looking for work, Airline looking for AMEs and will fly you to your interview

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Mirabel charter airline woos job seekers with free flights

 
‎Yesterday, ‎September ‎5, ‎2019, ‏‎5:02:36 PM | Canadian Aviation News

News provided by Montreal Gazette – link to full story and updates

Nolinor Aviation holds an open house with a difference in an effort to “open some eyes” in an increasingly competitive job market.

FRÉDÉRIC TOMESCO, Montreal Gazette, September 5, 2019

0907-city-nolinor-1.jpg?quality=80&strip Nolinor vice-president Marco Prud’homme inside one of the company’s planes undergoing maintenance in Mirabel. PIERRE OBENDRAUF / MONTREAL GAZETTE

Talk about hopping the extra mile.

On Saturday morning, Quebec charter-flight operator Nolinor Aviation will fly South Shore job seekers from St-Hubert airport to Mirabel — and back — as part of an “open house day” aimed at filling more than 20 aircraft mechanic positions.

The company is hoping the short trip to the lower Laurentians aboard one of its Boeing 737 jets, as well as on-site discussions with employees and recruiters, will make it stand out in an increasingly competitive job market.

“Maybe it’ll open some eyes,” Marco Prud’homme, a vice-president of the company, said a telephone interview. “It’s a 20-minute flight. If this was a straight line it would be even faster, but we’ll have to go around the island of Montreal because of the air traffic in and out of Dorval.”

Such are the lengths that some employers feel compelled to go to in a bid to recruit staff in Quebec, where the unemployment rate continues to set record lows.

That labour shortage you keep reading about? It’s a reality for Nolinor.

“This summer we had to refuse several contracts because we simply did not have the personnel to operate flights,” Prud’homme said.

Founded in 1992, family-owned Nolinor has carved out a niche by running ferry flights for mining companies to some of Canada’s most remote regions.

As part of a 10-year contract with gold miner Agnico Eagle, it links Montreal to Val d’Or and company mines in Nunavut, operating same-day, round-trip flights several times a week.

Nolinor also runs charter flights for sports franchises such as the Montreal Alouettes and the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League, as well as the Laval Rocket, the American Hockey League affiliate of the Canadiens.

Besides the aircraft mechanic positions, Nolinor wants to fill dozens of ground and administrative jobs that haven’t even been advertised yet, Prud’homme said. Wages for mechanics fresh out of school start at about $18.50 an hour, plus benefits.

0907-city-nolinor-2.jpg?quality=55&strip “There’s a lot of poaching going on in the industry,” says Nolinor vice-president Marco Prud’homme. PIERRE OBENDRAUF / MONTREAL GAZETTE

This is the second open house day that Nolinor is conducting this year. About two months ago, company recruiters hosted 120 candidates in Mirabel, filling about 20 flight attendant positions.

“There’s a lot of poaching going on in the industry,” Prud’homme said. “Just today, we had one pilot leave us. For a young person that wants to work in air transport, now is a great time. Companies like Sunwing Airlines, Air Transat and Air Canada are hiring a lot, whether you’re a co-pilot or a mechanic. We’re sort of in the middle of the food chain here.”

Mirabel-based Nolinor now has about 220 employees. Current job openings also include crew schedulers, flight attendants and pilots, according to the company’s website.

Nolinor’s drive to recruit pilots is facing global competition. According to a 2018 forecast by Montreal-based flight-simulator maker CAE, airlines will need to hire more than 270,000 pilots over the next decade amid an expected doubling in passenger travel.

Canadian regulations on crew fatigue and pilot flight times are also having an impact on staffing plans. Prud’homme estimates his company will need as much as 35 per cent more staff to meet the new rules, which are due to take effect by the end of the year.

“When everyone needs to hire at the same time, it’s a problem,” he says.

Nolinor’s business has benefited from a mad scramble among carriers such as Canada’s Sunwing for spare aircraft following the crash of two Boeing 737 Max jets in Indonesia and Ethiopia.

With transportation authorities worldwide ordering the grounding of all 737 Max jets, Sunwing — a Max operator — hired Nolinor to perform replacement flights between Toronto and the Caribbean.

“After the 737 Max crisis, we became swamped,” Prud’homme said.

And although Nolinor’s contract with Sunwing is set to expire next week, the executive isn’t convinced the relationship will end there.

“People are talking about a return to service of the Max in the coming months, but who can really say that with confidence?” he asked. “Maybe we’ll end up doing other flights for Sunwing for the Christmas season.”

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Nothing like a ride in an old B737-200 to lure AMEs... 🤣

18.50$/hour... They are about 5$ short from where the competition starts their apprentices at...

It's not a labor shortage, it's people learning that if they want stability (ie no layoffs like at Bombardier or Aveos), mobility and decent wages,they have a multitude of other fields they can work in. Kids have choices... The aviation industry has to do a better job at selling itself as a respectable field to work in.

The industry giants did this to themselves...

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1 hour ago, mrlupin said:

Nothing like a ride in an old B737-200 to lure AMEs... 🤣

18.50$/hour... They are about 5$ short from where the competition starts their apprentices at...

It's not a labor shortage, it's people learning that if they want stability (ie no layoffs like at Bombardier or Aveos), mobility and decent wages,they have a multitude of other fields they can work in. Kids have choices... The aviation industry has to do a better job at selling itself as a respectable field to work in.

The industry giants did this to themselves...

Don't forget the Unions that helped them to get there. 😀

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AME is a Skilled Trade like it or not.  It's about time it was recognized as one

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On 9/12/2019 at 9:41 PM, Marshall said:

Don't forget the Unions that helped them to get there. 😀

What are you saying Marshall?

The union got who, where?

 

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2 hours ago, mrlupin said:

What are you saying Marshall?

The union got who, where?

 

If the present rates of pay are shabby, that is only because that the contracts were signed off by the unions.  (on behalf of their members).  But of course the real reason goes back to when the Unions wanted to hold a bigger club over the airlines and the ramp staff etc were merged into the same bargaining group as the mechanics. 

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That only applies to AC.  What is the excuse in the rest of the industry?

 

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18 minutes ago, boestar said:

That only applies to AC.  What is the excuse in the rest of the industry?

 

Happened at Canadian Pacific also.  Which in the day was the rest of the Major industry.  

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Ancient history.  What is happening today is totally unrelated to what was going on at CP 25+ years ago.

Today we are riddled with an entire industry of Highly skilled individuals who are treated like part time workers at the drive through.

While the AME association is working towards making the profession better, nothing is happening on the wage front.  A Car Mechanic, Industrial Millwright, Pipe Fitter, Plumber, electrician are all SKILLED Trades.  Red Seal Skilled Trades.  An Aircraft Mechanic is not.  Please explain to me why?

I have been an AME for over 30 years now.  The New guys coming into the profession (the few there are) Get the Trifecta of Crappy hours, crappy pay and crappy work.  Some of the few wont stick with it.  The ones that do will take 15 years to get to the top of the ladder.  Some may get there quicker with some initiative and training when its available to them.

The Unions have held back more workers with the skill and initiative in favour of the more senior slacker for decades.  So they are not the ones to be praised at all for making things better for sure ( unless you happen to be the senior slacker).

As for AC, yes the Merging of the Ramp and Maintenance under the IAMAW was the single stupidest move any bargaining group has ever made.  When the unskilled workers out number the skilled workers in the bargaining unit by huge numbers, What did you think was going to happen.  The rampies rule the roost and the AME's suck the hind teat.

Unless the entire AME group gets off their collective butts and fights, the status quo will remain and continue to set the (low) benchmark for the canadian industry.

Just my Opinion

 

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So are you saying there is only a problem at AC?  My point was that as both AC and CP (under the IAM) merged both working groups, the two airlines then set the stage for the larger lower paid employees to be able to control the wages of the higher paid group.  This then of course established "industry standard" wage levels for AMEs for all Canadian Carriers.  So what happened 25 years or so when the two carriers were rivals,  is reflected in the wages of current AMEs. 

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The Merging of the RAMP and Maintenance took place with the IAM long before the merger with CP.  It continued after the Two airlines mreged however even with a few failed attempts to split off one group from the other.

What I am saying is that the Airlines like AC and Westjet set the bar for the rest of the industry.  They are the benchmark.  If they raise the wages to a more reasonable level with better progression then the rest of the industry will have no choice but to follow suit or lose thier staff to the airlines.

 

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25 minutes ago, boestar said:

The Merging of the RAMP and Maintenance took place with the IAM long before the merger with CP.  It continued after the Two airlines mreged however even with a few failed attempts to split off one group from the other.

What I am saying is that the Airlines like AC and Westjet set the bar for the rest of the industry.  They are the benchmark.  If they raise the wages to a more reasonable level with better progression then the rest of the industry will have no choice but to follow suit or lose thier staff to the airlines.

 

I was not talking about the merger, the IAMAW at both carriers (AC and CP) merged their Ramp staff and AMEs in separate actions .... when they were direct competitors and that had everything to so with todays wages for AMEs.

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18 hours ago, Marshall said:

I was not talking about the merger, the IAMAW at both carriers (AC and CP) merged their Ramp staff and AMEs in separate actions .... when they were direct competitors and that had everything to so with todays wages for AMEs.

 

You seem to have a very different version of history Marshall, when did the IAMAW merge ramp staff and AMEs in your version? Are you referring to CP, AC or both?

From what I recall, CP's AMEs were separate from Ramp services and at AC, the IAM has always had Ramp and AMEs together.

Presently at the maple leaf carrier, although ramp services negotiates at a different table than AMEs, the ratification of the contract (it is a single contract) is a collective vote. The employer only has to dangle some sort of carrot to the ramp group and they will vote any contract through regardless of the AME part of the contract. (a signing bonus would do the job...)

This gives the employer an incredible opportunity to dictate salary and condition regardless of supply and demand, skills, inflation etc.... In 2003, salaries and conditions were chopped and frozen for 10 years by the employer and a judge, in 2011 or 2012 a contract was imposed by the Conservative government. In 2016, a 10 year, meager contract was voted in by ramp services and the AMEs got this imposed to them.

In the same time, we had the massive layoff at Bombardier, we had AC sell create ACTS, sell it off as Aveos and that shell company went under in 2012 with massive layoffs.

The original post was that of the industry having issues recruiting. I restate what I said:

"It's not a labor shortage, it's people learning that if they want stability (ie no layoffs like at Bombardier or Aveos), mobility and decent wages,they have a multitude of other fields they can work in. Kids have choices... The aviation industry has to do a better job at selling itself as a respectable field to work in. "

 

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CP Air,    http://iam764.ca/history/   the customer service employees mentioned below were "station attendants" who were tasked with loading and unloading the aircraft with little or no contact to the customers, most if not all passengers were handled by passenger agents under 'BRAC" .

Quote

STRIKE AGAINST CP AIR IN 1973

For 31 years, the Union and the Company (first Canadian Airways, and later Canadian Pacific Airlines (CPAir), had been able to negotiate collective agreements without resorting to industrial action.

In 1973, industrial action became necessary. This was a time of significant technological change for the airline industry in general, and airline work in particular. Older propeller driven aircraft were being retired, and replaced with jet turbine aircraft like the Douglas DC8 and the Boeing 727, 737 and 747. New workplace issues were present on Negotiations Agendas as these aircraft were introduced. In addition, the charismatic President of CPA, Grant McConachie had passed away, and J.C. Gilmer had became head of the airline.

In 1973 Local Lodge 764 represented 1358 Maintenance, Stores and Customer Service employees at CPAir. Negotiations for a new collective agreement began in early 1973 and concluded in May (Agreement No. 20)

 

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