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Marshall

Questionable Ruling against AC

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Based on this ruling, all airlines operating in / through Quebec are ripe for suits, maybe even a class action one.

Air Canada ordered to pay $21,000 in damages for language rights violations

 
‎Today, ‎August ‎29, ‎2019, ‏‎17 minutes ago | Canadian Aviation News

News provided by the Montreal Gazette – link to full story and updates

The main complaint was that exit signs on aircraft gave less prominence to French than English and only the word “lift” appeared on seatbelt buckles.

PRESSE CANADIENNE Updated: August 29, 2019

transat-at-ma-mach.jpg?quality=80&strip= Air Canada aircraft. CHRIS HELGREN / REUTERS FILES

The Federal Court of Canada has ordered Air Canada to pay $21,000 in damages to two francophones for repeated violations of their language rights.

Michel and Lynda Thibodeau filed 22 complaints in 2016 with the Official Languages Commissioner, alleging the carrier violated the Official Languages Act.

Their main complaint was that exit signs on aircraft gave less prominence to French than English and only the word “lift” appeared on the buckles of seatbelts on the aircraft. They also complained that a boarding announcement to passengers in Fredericton airport was less complete in French than in English.

The two plaintiffs argued that Air Canada systematically violates the linguistic rights of francophones.

Air Canada argued that the complaints were based on too rigorous an interpretation of the law, which does not call for identical treatment of both official languages but that they receive treatment that is substantially the same.

The court, however, did not agree, ruling this week that unilingual or predominantly English signage and the boarding announcement made largely in English violated the law and that the Thibodeaus’ rights had been violated.

The court ordered Air Canada to send the plaintiffs formal letters of apology and pay damages and interest of up to $1,500 for each complaint. Damages for eight of those complaints had already been settled prior to the hearing and were not included in the judgment.

The court refused to issue a mandatory order — sought by the plaintiffs — that would oblige Air Canada to conform to its linguistic responsibilities because of the widespread prominence of English on aircraft signage and the carrier’s apparent unwillingness to correct the situation.

“There is no reason to believe that Air Canada deliberately violated the (Official Languages) Act, and such an order would impose on it the constant threat of contempt of court proceedings,” the court wrote.

Air Canada told the court that if it came to the conclusion the signage did not conform to the law, the air carrier was prepared, within six months after a final judgement, to file a plan that would see them replaced. The court acknowledged the offer.

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Not this guy again.  It's like he's made a cottage industry out of suing AC.  I have to ask.  Is this really about being the saviour of la francophonie, or is it just about the money or whatever need is met by this conflict? 

I believe he is bilingual, is he not?  Lives in Ontario, works in Ottawa, is he federal civil service? 

Things that make you go 'Hmmmm'.

Vs

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Its BS is what it is plain and simple

 

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I would also bet you will not find any buckles that do not simply say "Lift" or have no verbiage on them.   I wonder what the seat belts on Air Creebec, Air Transat or indeed Air France show?  Exit signage is a different problem. Of course the inseat safety card or indeed the preflight cabin briefing would in my opinion eliminate any bitch about the "Lift" wording. 

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2 hours ago, boestar said:

Its BS is what it is plain and simple

 

Don’t you mean TM? ( Taureau Merde)

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The exit sign thing is complete nonsense.  A good chunk of the word does not speak french but does understand EXIT.  Is this individual really so bereft of world knowledge that they think all aircraft stay within Canada?  I can't think of a single mainline type that does that.

Vs

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Quebec language law..

”...require that all public displays featuring a non-French trademark must include a "sufficient presence of French" by adding a generic French term, slogan or description of the products or services of the business, in a legible manner.“

https://www.torys.com/insights/publications/2016/11/new-laws-for-quebec-signage

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41 minutes ago, Vsplat said:

The exit sign thing is complete nonsense.  A good chunk of the word does not speak french but does understand EXIT.  Is this individual really so bereft of world knowledge that they think all aircraft stay within Canada?  I can't think of a single mainline type that does that.

Vs

It's been several years but most of the stop signs I saw in France said "Stop".

Edited by J.O.
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1 hour ago, J.O. said:

It's been several years but most of the stop signs I saw in France said "Stop".

"Stop" is a valid French word, borrowed from English. As to why it is used on stop signs in France: France has signed several treaties (most notably the Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals in 1971) that mandates the use of the label "STOP" on stop signs.

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All signage on the aircraft must be approved by Transport canada in order to meet the requirements under CARS.  The Emergency exit signage is approved under the regulations.  Take it up with TC NOT AC

 

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parasite

 [par´ah-sīt]

1. a plant or animal that lives upon or within another living organism at whose expense it obtains some advantage; 

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The ACPPA requires AC to respect the Official Languages Act

The same rules do not apply to other Canadian carriers 

https://openparliament.ca/committees/official-languages/42-1/63/

Section 10 of the ACPPA prescribes that Air Canada is subject to the Official Languages Act, or the OLA, and is therefore considered a federal institution pursuant to the OLA. Air Canada is the only Canadian airline that is subject to obligations under the OLA. It has been subject to the OLA since 1969, including part IV, covering the communications with and services to the public; part V, covering the language of work; part VI, covering the participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians; and part VII, covering the advancement of English and French.

Other major Canadian airlines, such as WestJet, Air Transat, Porter Airlines, and Sunwing, are not subject to the same obligations as Air Canada under the ACPPA or the OLA. However, all major airlines must provide safety instructions to their passengers in English and in French under the Canadian Aviation Regulations pursuant to the Aeronautics Act, which also falls under the responsibility of the Minister of Transport.

It should be noted that Air Canada does not receive any direct or indirect funding from the federal government for its linguistic training programs, the language assessments of its employees, or its bilingual communications activities. Nevertheless, the airline allocates significant resources, both financial and human, to develop and maintain its linguistic programs and internal tools to meet its obligations under the OLA.

 

 

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Wonder why he waited 5 years to file the exit sign/seat belt complaints?  

So AC has to ask the aircraft seat belt manufacturer to install bilingual “lift” labels on the belts?  Good grief

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There once was a survey conducted on all Jazz flights. If a certain percentage was reached

a French speaking F/A was required. It was rumoured that the junior French speaking F/As

were filling out a lot of the survey questions themselves on the more desired routes.

French on YYZ-ATL, I don't think that percentage would really have been met!   

 

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YYZ-ATL is a desired route?  The junior french-speaking FAs can have it!

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21 hours ago, seeker said:

YYZ-ATL is a desired route?  The junior french-speaking FAs can have it!

You missed the point of it!

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