737 Max Updates and Cancellations


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Who cares how Southwest  feels.  They got what they demanded,  they get what they deserve. 

14,000 Words Of "Blame The Pilots" That Whitewash Boeing Of 737 MAX Failure The New York Times Magazine just published a 14,000 words piece about the Boeing 737 MAX accidents. It is headlined:

I'm genuinely curious on how they conduct these sim exercises. Having test pilots or FAA inspectors doing the flying isn't a proper assessment in my view.  It's like having a biased jury in a local tr

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What the 737 MAX's return to the sky will mean for passengers

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And it will be a brave airline that wants to be first to take the flak for the rest of the industry in putting the MAX back into service.

John Walton, CNN • Published 13th November 2020

(CNN) — Would you fly on the Boeing 737 MAX? That question is going to become all too real for passengers in the near future when the aircraft that's been grounded for some 600 days returns to service.

The 737 MAX was grounded in March 2019, following two crashes within five months of each other that killed 346 people.

All indications are now pointing to the aircraft being certified to return to service soon in the US following changes mandated by regulators.

US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) administrator Steve Dickson said earlier this week that the review of proposed design changes could be "finished in the coming days," and the regulatory process from there is expected to be relatively simple.

2020 is a year where the unprecedented is the new normal, and of course the current state of Washington, DC, is no exception. But even if the FAA sticks to that timetable, it's no exaggeration to say that aviation doesn't have a road map to convincing passengers that the latest generation of the world's best-selling aircraft, the Boeing 737, is safe.

The 737 Max is set to fly again soon. But Boeing's financial struggle is far from over

Some carriers, including American Airlines, are already starting to sell tickets on the MAX (albeit, in this case, on a single daily round-trip).

"Our customers will be able to easily identify whether they are traveling on a 737 MAX even if schedules change," says American Airlines spokesperson Curtis Blessing. "The aircraft type will be visible through the booking path, and if schedules change, there will be notification."

United Airlines is promising passengers that they'll be able to rebook if they don't want to fly the MAX.

Southwest Airlines, meanwhile -- which had the largest MAX fleet in the US before the grounding -- says it will take longer, suggesting three to four months from the legal ungrounding to returning to service.

Southwest chief operating officer Mike Van de Ven said, in an industry earnings call in October, "We've got significant operational experience with the aircraft. It is our most cost-effective aircraft. It is our most reliable aircraft. It is our most environmentally friendly aircraft, and it's our most comfortable aircraft. So we really look forward to flying it again."

But the arguments that might placate investors are unlikely to persuade passengers.

Getting passengers comfortable is a tall order

Fundamentally, part of the problem with convincing passengers that the MAX is safe is that there's no playbook for how to do that, and another is that the airline and commercial aviation industry doesn't like to talk about safety.

There's a substantial segment of the population that already experiences some form of fear of flying, and they don't want to grow those numbers.

There's also the risk that a safety campaign could heighten passenger fears: if Boeing and the airlines operating the 737 MAX go all out on a public relations spree -- which is costly, and the greatest ever recession is very much not the time for that -- they risk reminding people of the problems with the aircraft, or making people who weren't watching the news two years ago aware of them.

"Boeing has to worry about the unintended consequences of talking about safety," explains Addison Schonland, partner at US-based aviation analysis firm AirInsight Group.

"It's a touchy thing because you want passengers to basically forget they are on a MAX. How can Boeing do this seamlessly? With American talking about educating their customers, that helps, but again, there can be unintended consequences. Or do you just tough it out and claim the MAX is the most tested airplane Boeing has ever delivered?"

Indeed, airlines have been strategizing for some time around how to balance using the MAX airplanes for which they have a need with the fact that some (or even many) passengers won't want to fly them.

There's some wiggle room for airlines to avoid being the first mover here, given that the Covid-19 crisis has reduced the pressure on existing fleets, but at some point some airline will have to be the first to get the MAX back in the air.

And that will come with unprecedented levels of interest from regulators, from media, and from passengers.

We live in the 2020s, where almost everyone flying has a cellphone to record what's happening, and it only takes one passenger to go viral while sobbing fearfully about getting on a 737 MAX as an overworked gate agent refuses or is unable to rebook them, to create a serious image problem -- let alone the first time a 737 MAX has to divert or return to its departure airport for a relatively routine issue.

Beyond whatever public relations blitz is put into effect, you can expect most airlines to put in place a policy (openly or quietly) where passengers who don't want to fly on a 737 MAX can change their ticket, at no extra charge.

So when will AirInsight's Schonland be ready to get on a 737 MAX?

"Not for a while is my answer. Maybe wait to see how it goes. I am pretty sure the revised MAX will be a better airplane from systems and safety," he says.

"But still," Schonland concludes, he's "in no rush to try it."

Boeing has a further problem: the rest of the world

Crucially, Boeing doesn't just need to persuade Americans, or US regulators.

After damning revelations in investigations into Boeing, its regulator the FAA, and the relationship between them -- including the US House Transportation Committee's report, which states clearly that "Boeing failed in its design and development of the MAX, and the FAA failed in its oversight of Boeing and its certification of the aircraft" -- international aviation safety regulation agencies are insisting on making up their own minds.

In addition to the key decisions by Europe's aviation regulator, EASA, and China's CAAC, certification from smaller independent regulators in key countries like Australia, Canada, Japan, Singapore and the UAE will be crucial.

There is also, for Boeing and the US, a wider China issue: the increasingly complicated politico-economic relations between the United States and China feature US exporter Boeing as a key player.

Beyond the essential safety certification role of CAAC, China's interests lie in developing its homegrown airliner programs, which in-depth analysis of the MAX's systems would assist. And of course, Boeing is very useful leverage against this White House or the next.

But Boeing has a problem that's even more daunting: persuading passengers that the fundamental flaws in the 737 MAX have been addressed and resolved and are not going to make them the 347th person to die on board these aircraft.

In the manufacturer's place, says AirInsight's Schonland, the immediate priorities of the Boeing 737 MAX program should be "FAA Certification, the aircraft update to meet certification requirements, and deliveries — in that order."

But part of the delivery piece of the puzzle is around airline demand, already at historic lows with Covid-19, and which will be even less for an aircraft that has been the subject of damning investigations for two years, and that many experts and passengers do not trust to be safe.

And it will be a brave airline that wants to be first to take the flak for the rest of the industry in putting the MAX back into service.

John Walton is an international transportation and aviation journalist based in France, specializing in airlines, commercial aircraft and the passenger experience.

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Boeing and the FAA cannot afford to screw this up.  Should a MAX have an accident after reintroduction, Boeing is done and the FAA will lose all credibility.

It should by all accounts be the safest aircraft in the air.

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Approval for Boeing’s 737 Max Set for Wednesday by U.S. FAA

From BNN Bloomberg – link to source story

Alan Levin, Bloomberg News

Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are seen parked on Boeing property along the Duwamish River near Boeing Field on August 13, 2019 in Seattle, Washington.

Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are seen parked on Boeing property along the Duwamish River near Boeing Field on August 13, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. , Photographer: David Ryder/Getty Images

(Bloomberg) — U.S. regulators plan on Wednesday to unveil the long-awaited final requirements for allowing Boeing Co.’s grounded 737 Max to return to service after 20 months, according to a person briefed on the plans.

The Federal Aviation Administration has begun notifying the aviation industry of its schedule, said the person, who wasn’t able to discuss the matter publicly and asked not to be identified.

An agency spokesman declined to comment. FAA Administrator Steven Dickson issued a written statement on Nov. 9 saying the announcement was expected “in the coming days.” The agency has already released proposed software upgrades and fixes to the plane, and plans for revised pilot training.

Boeing’s best-selling jet was grounded on March 13, 2019, after the second fatal crash linked to a flight-control system. The crashes killed 346 people.

A decision by regulators to end the longest jetliner grounding in U.S. history would mark a major milestone for Boeing’s effort to revive the core of its commercial-aircraft business.

Still, with the coronavirus pandemic flattening demand for new planes, the U.S. planemaker faces an arduous recovery as it seeks to reap cash by delivering hundreds of Max built during the flying ban.

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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5 hours ago, boestar said:

Boeing and the FAA cannot afford to screw this up.  Should a MAX have an accident after reintroduction, Boeing is done and the FAA will lose all credibility.

It should by all accounts be the safest aircraft in the air.

It should be.   🤞  Nobody I know will be rushing out to buy tickets though.    

I expect customer complaints will change as well. 

"Not only will they not refund my flight cancelled by COVID - they wanted to rebook me on one of those 737s that keep crashing!"

 

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FAA Updates on Boeing 737 MAX

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News type:  All news items News & Updates Press Release Fact Sheet Speech Testimony Media Advisory 

FAA Updates on Boeing 737 MAX11/18/2020

FAA Statement on Boeing 737 Max Return to Service

FAA Administrator Steve Dickson today signed an order (PDF) that paves the way for the Boeing 737 MAX to return to commercial service. Administrator Dicksons action followed a comprehensive and methodical safety review process (PDF) that took 20 months to complete. During that time, FAA employees worked diligently to identify and address the safety issues that played a role in the tragic loss of 346 lives aboard Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. Throughout our transparent process, we cooperated closely with our foreign counterparts on every aspect of the return to service. Additionally, Administrator Dickson personally took the recommended pilot training and piloted the Boeing 737 MAX, so he could experience the handling of the aircraft firsthand.

In addition to rescinding the order that grounded the aircraft, the FAA today published an Airworthiness Directive (PDF) specifying design changes that must be made before the aircraft returns to service, issued a Continued Airworthiness Notification to the International Community (CANIC), and published the MAX training requirements. (PDF) These actions do not allow the MAX to return immediately to the skies. The FAA must approve 737 MAX pilot training program revisions for each U.S. airline operating the MAX and will retain its authority to issue airworthiness certificates and export certificates of airworthiness for all new 737 MAX aircraft manufactured since the FAA issued the grounding order. Furthermore, airlines that have parked their MAX aircraft must take required maintenance steps to prepare them to fly again.

The design and certification of this aircraft included an unprecedented level of collaborative and independent reviews by aviation authorities around the world. Those regulators have indicated that Boeing’s design changes, together with the changes to crew procedures and training enhancements, will give them the confidence to validate the aircraft as safe to fly in their respective countries and regions.  Following the return to service, the FAA will continue to work closely with our foreign civil aviation partners to evaluate any potential additional enhancements for the aircraft. The agency also will conduct the same rigorous, continued operational safety oversight of the MAX that we provide for the entire U.S. commercial fleet.

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Statement by Minister Garneau on Federal Aviation Administration's certification of changes to the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft Français


NEWS PROVIDED BY

Transport Canada 

Nov 18, 2020, 08:09 ET

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OTTAWA, ON, Nov. 18, 2020 /CNW/ -

"Our government remains committed to keeping Canadians, the travelling public, and the transportation system safe and secure.

"We acknowledge that the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has released an Airworthiness Directive for the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. Through this directive, the FAA is mandating its approved changes made to the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, and confirms it can return to service in U.S. airspace.

"Transport Canada has worked extensively with the FAA and other key certifying authorities, including the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the National Civil Aviation Agency of Brazil (ANAC), as well as the three Canadian operators of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, and their pilot unions throughout the validation process of the aircraft to address all factors necessary toward a safe return to service of the aircraft.

"Transport Canada safety experts continue their independent validation process to determine whether to approve the proposed changes to the aircraft. We expect this process to conclude very soon. However, there will be differences between what the FAA has approved today, and what Canada will require for its operators. These differences will include additional procedures on the flight deck and pre-flight, as well as differences in training.

"The commercial flight restrictions for the operation of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft in Canadian airspace remain in effect and will not be lifted until the department is fully satisfied that all its safety concerns have been addressed, and that enhanced flight crew procedures and training are in place in Canada."

Transport Canada is online at www.tc.gc.ca. Subscribe to e-news or stay connected through Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Instagram to keep up to date on the latest from Transport Canada.

This news release may be made available in alternative formats for persons living with visual disabilities.

SOURCE Transport Canada

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For further information: Amy Butcher, Director of Communications and Parliamentary Affairs, Office of the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, Ottawa, Amy.Butcher@tc.gc.ca; Media Relations, Transport Canada, Ottawa, 613-993-0055, media@tc.gc.ca

Related Links

http://www.tc.gc.ca/

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13 hours ago, FA@AC said:

Like all such approvals it is subject to compliance to a number of conditions prior to the aircraft being cleared for commercial flights. 

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The EASA has today published a Proposed Airworthiness Directive for the 737 MAX returning to service. With this, a 28-day public consultation period has started, with the final Airworthiness Directive expected to be published in mid-January 2021.

As the Executive Director of the EASA describes this development:

“EASA made clear from the outset that we would conduct our own objective and independent assessment of the 737 MAX, working closely with the FAA and Boeing, to make sure that there can be no repeat of these tragic accidents, which touched the lives of so many people.

The EASA Proposed Airworthiness Directive is now open for a 28-day consultation period. Once that ends, EASA will take time to review the comments made, before publishing its final Airworthiness Directive. That final publication is expected from mid-January 2021 and will constitute the formal ungrounding decision of the plane for all 737 MAX aircraft operated by operators from EASA Member States. After the return to service, EASA has committed to monitor the plane closely in-service, to allow for early detection of any problems that may arise. 

In conjunction with the Proposed Airworthiness Directive, EASA also issued a Preliminary Safety Directive for 28-day consultation. This will require non-European airlines which are holders of EASA third country operator (TCO) authorisation to implement equivalent requirements, including aircrew training. This will allow for the return to service of the 737 MAX when the aircraft concerned are operated under an EASA TCO authorisation into, within or out of the territory of the EASA Member States.

 

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The PAD is good.  Would like to see Canada follow that path, particularly the marked stick shaker CBs, and empowering pilots to pull them.  Unfortunate about the RNP AR prohibition.  Hope there's a way to get that authorization back.

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Pilots Unafraid To Fly On Boeing 737 Max

How do pilots feel about the troubled 737 Max return to service? Most say, “Let’s go flying.”  Pilots Unafraid To Fly On Boeing 737 Max - Plane & Pilot Magazine (planeandpilotmag.com)

By Plane & Pilot UPDATED NOVEMBER 24, 2020  SAVE ARTICLE

 
 
 

As we expressed when we published the survey last week asking how confident our audience members were in the 737 Max, we weren’t quite sure what to expect. As it turned out, a strong majority of those who took the survey have little fear of potential risk they’d encounter flying on the jet liner. The plane has been grounded for 20 months now after a pair of catastrophic crashes, one in 2017 and one in 2018, which killed a total of 346 people. Investigators are trying to pin down the causes pointed at both Boeing and the FAA for system-wide failures that resulted in the worldwide grounding of the next-gen 737.

To our question, “How confident are you that the FAA and Boeing got the design of the 737 Max right this time?” respondents were either “extremely” (49%) or “fairly confident” (21%) that they did, meaning that 70% of respondents expressed a strong degree of confidence in the fixes made to the plane. Again, a strong majority, 64%, said that they’d fly on the 737 Max on Day One of its reintroduction.

Perhaps most surprising to us is that 35% of those who answered the survey said that they would have flown on it even if it the underlying issue hadn’t been fully addressed. To be fair, 65% say that they would have declined.

In response to our last question, “Would you fly on one after it has been back in service for a while?” 60% said that wouldn’t need to wait even that long and 26% answered that they’d wait a bit but would fly on it once it proved itself safe.

 
 

A lucky 13% of respondents said they’d never fly on the 737 Max.

It’s never too late to add your voice to the survey. And thanks to all those who took part.

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As I said before...  The 737 MAX will be the safest aircraft in the sky when it starts flying again.  It HAS to be.

If another one crashes, it will bankrupt Boeing and the FAA will lose all credibility.  I do not think anyone wants that to happen.

 

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On 11/25/2020 at 9:03 AM, ILB said:

The PAD is good.  Would like to see Canada follow that path, particularly the marked stick shaker CBs, and empowering pilots to pull them.  Unfortunate about the RNP AR prohibition.  Hope there's a way to get that authorization back.

Where did you read about the RNP restriction?  Is it Canada or other country specific?  Too many documents to filter through to find that one detail. 
Thanks. 

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26 minutes ago, airbrake said:

Where did you read about the RNP restriction?  Is it Canada or other country specific?  Too many documents to filter through to find that one detail. 
Thanks. 

EASA Publishes Boeing 737 MAX Proposed Airworthiness Directive with RNP-AR, Stick Shaker Provisions

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Airlines operating EASA-registered MAX aircraft will also be prohibited from using the aircraft's autopilot on high-precision Required Navigation Performance - Authorization Required (RNP AR) approaches. RNP AR is an advanced Performance Based Navigation (PBN) approach procedure that requires prior authorization from a civil aviation authority. It enables an aircraft to fly a predetermined path between waypoints by placing an aircraft’s airport approach on a curved, precise path where the descent and positioning are constantly augmented by satellite-based navigation signals.

EASA Publishes Boeing 737 MAX Proposed Airworthiness Directive with RNP-AR, Stick Shaker Provisions - Aviation Today

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On 11/28/2020 at 1:25 PM, airbrake said:

Where did you read about the RNP restriction?  Is it Canada or other country specific?  Too many documents to filter through to find that one detail. 
Thanks. 

Read it in the EASA Proposed Airworthiness Directive.  I like the EASA PAD, kinda hope Canada adopts same, just unfortunate to lose the RNP capability.  Would like to know more about they why.

If I wasn't flying the MAX, I wouldn't read the documents either.  But I am so I do.  Personally not of fan of reading distillations/summaries of source documents.  That applies to everything. From Shakespeare to accident investigations to  IPCC reports. 

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1 hour ago, North of You said:

WJ pilots will start going down to MIA in January for training on the Max.  I can’t speak fo AC folks. 

AC pilots likely being trained on the simulators (2) that they own, not sure if they are in YYZ or YUL

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