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Air Canada Diversion to HNL

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Multiple injuries reported as Air Canada flight makes emergency landing in Honolulu

https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/air-canada-flight-makes-emergency-landing-with-multiple-injuries-1.4504071

 

CTV Montreal Staff
Published Thursday, July 11, 2019 12:56PM EDT
Last Updated Thursday, July 11, 2019 1:43PM EDT

An Air Canada flight from Toronto to Sydney, Australia, with a stop in Vancouver, made an emergency landing in Honolulu on Thursday.

Air Canada Flight 33 was two hours west of Hawaii when it encountered unexpected severe turbulence over the Pacific Ocean.

The plane then turned and requested an emergency landing in Honolulu, touching down at 6:45 a.m. Hawaiian Time (12:45 EDT).

A source familiar with the situation tells CTV News that 20 to 25 passengers and one crew member were injured as a result.

Many of the people hurt have head and neck injuries.

In a statement Air Canada said that the injuries were considered minor and that medical personnel were examining the passengers.

"We are currently making arrangements for the passengers including hotel accommodations and meals in Honolulu, as well as options for resumption of the flight," said a spokesperson.

The plane was a Boeing 777 with 269 passengers and 15 crew members.

 

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I love this.  'without knowing the specifics...this area is known for turbulence'.  So, without knowing anything, this is what is known.  BS.

These people who cannot wait to get their face in front of a camera are an embarrassment.  Without knowing the specifics, the message should be, wait for the facts, thoughts for the passengers and crew.  Full stop.

Vs

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Flight aware showing it was cruising around 9000 meters or so.

Air Canada spokesperson Peter Fitzpatrick said the plane was about two hours past Hawaii when it hit "severe clear air" turbulence

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25 minutes ago, Marshall said:

Flight aware showing it was cruising around 9000 meters or so.

Air Canada spokesperson Peter Fitzpatrick said the plane was about two hours past Hawaii when it hit "severe clear air" turbulence

Outisde of China, altitudes are measured in feet.

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40 minutes ago, AIP said:

Outisde of China, altitudes are measured in feet.

 And your point is? We all know the ICAO standard is used for International flight plans bu

FlightAware reports that the flight had

Speed
Filed: 906 km/h
Altitude
Filed: 9,150 m

About FlightAware

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FlightAware receives data from air traffic control systems in over 45 countries, FlightAware's network of ADS-B ground stations in 195 countries, Aireon global space-based global ADS-B, and datalink (satellite/VHF) via every major provider, including ARINC, SITA, Satcom Direct, Garmin, and Honeywell GoDirect.

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Founded in 2005, FlightAware is privately held with offices in Houston, New York City, and Singapore.

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I’m always amused how turbulence is blamed for injuries when in reality not wearing a seatbelt is really the culprit. In another article on this incident I read that most of the injured were in “first class” and I wonder how many people buckle up when fully reclined. :Scratch-Head:

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I always leave my belt on even when sleeping fully reclined

 

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A good reminder to not spend too much time out of your seat or let your kids run loose up and down the aisles.

I wonder if this was worse than expected along their route or without any warning? Pacific crossings can be nasty sometimes  .

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Time to add some shock therapy into the safety demo. Run a few clips of people flying through the cabin in similar conditions.

Yes, I'm kidding but it's like people don't pay attention to such stories.

Edited by J.O.

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1 hour ago, J.O. said:

Time to add some shock therapy into the safety demo. Run a few clips of people flying through the cabin in similar conditions.

Yes, I'm kidding but it's like people don't pay attention to such stories.

The same folks don't pay attention to the safety demo / video either.

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2 hours ago, J.O. said:

Time to add some shock therapy into the safety demo. Run a few clips of people flying through the cabin in similar conditions.

Yes, I'm kidding but it's like people don't pay attention to such stories.

Actually not a bad idea.

Any injured passenger on this flight will certainly have a different attitude about future seatbelt use.

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1 minute ago, blues deville said:

Actually not a bad idea.

Any injured passenger on this flight will certainly have a different attitude about future seatbelt use.

sadly their first thought might be to sue.  

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3 hours ago, blues deville said:

Pacific crossings can be nasty sometimes  .

My first flight to Hawaii was probably the most uncomfortable I have ever been in my life. When we stumbled off the plane at HNL a lot of people just sat down at the gate till the fluid in our ears settled down. The last 90 minutes of the flight felt like being inside a dryer with a cinderblock.

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2 hours ago, Super 80 said:

My first flight to Hawaii was probably the most uncomfortable I have ever been in my life. When we stumbled off the plane at HNL a lot of people just sat down at the gate till the fluid in our ears settled down. The last 90 minutes of the flight felt like being inside a dryer with a cinderblock.

Reminds me of this scene. "Chunky industrial waste puke". 

 

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For what it's worth and hoping I've have done the GMT math correctly here is a screen grab of the turnaround point and the appropriate SIG WXX chart. Certainly not the best predictor of potential CAT but it seems to be fairly benign wxx SW of HNL.  Reports say the CAT was sudden and not anticipated I suppose wake turbulence from nearby aircraft will be investigated.

Screen Shot 2019-07-12 at 2.52.28 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-07-12 at 3.00.13 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-07-12 at 3.02.13 PM.png

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9 hours ago, boestar said:

I always leave my belt on even when sleeping fully reclined

Me Too

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TSB tried a shocking video after the last 777 severe turbulence event. I guess it didn't convince too many people.

 

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21 minutes ago, JL said:

TSB tried a shocking video after the last 777 severe turbulence event. I guess it didn't convince too many people.

Great video.

In 25 years of flying, I've never experienced severe turbulence, and I hope I never do.  I've gone down to 25 to get below SIGMETed areas of forecasted SVR TBC. Sometimes that's not an option.

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17 hours ago, Johnboy said:

For what it's worth and hoping I've have done the GMT math correctly here is a screen grab of the turnaround point and the appropriate SIG WXX chart. Certainly not the best predictor of potential CAT but it seems to be fairly benign wxx SW of HNL.  Reports say the CAT was sudden and not anticipated I suppose wake turbulence from nearby aircraft will be investigated.

Some very high cloud activity along their route. Isolated and imbedded CB’s. A great combination at night. 

0F3ECB01-E9B8-49A7-9D94-7AF0A33C1A88.png

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Simple question....was the belt sign ON or OFF???  I haven’t read anything in the media reports to indicate.....if it was ON, end of story.

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1 hour ago, st27 said:

Simple question....was the belt sign ON or OFF???  I haven’t read anything in the media reports to indicate.....if it was ON, end of story.

This is from the AVherald, in the comments area of their coverage:

Quote

 

Long haul flight and has been recommended by health care professionals, you need to move around periodically to prevent the very real danger of DVT. Paxs interviewed in Honolulu said the seat belt sign was off, smooth skies and the cockpit announced "take your seats and seatbelts on". As one pax said, no sooner had the announcement ended, then they dropped as the turbulence hit.

Perhaps this is one instance where we don't need to blame anyone? I've yet to meet a single person who hasn't left their seat at some point on Aussie flights.

 

 

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Perhaps the last second seat belt and PA were a late response to something in their path. At that latitude you’ve to got to respect any kind of WX radar return and give lots of room. I’ve always used UAL’s recommended cloud above 25,000 gets 25 miles as starting point. FMC artwork is handy for the decision process and you can see which way they are moving. 

2EA62294-224E-48F7-8C9A-9D6E91C757FE.jpeg

B361EB80-9DDB-4F69-B429-C48F7C6AD912.png

Edited by blues deville
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Went through it once LAS-YVR. The whole flight was a bit choppy but the only two people that were not buckled in were the two F/A's at the back. Both were pretty beat up after. One removed the e-light above the lav door with her butt. We got into clear air and I cleaned up the galley and got them both buckled in for landing. 

I was doing the mtce rider thing so was half asleep (buckled in) at row 20'ish when it happened. I had some light bruising on my hips from the jolt but nothing more.

WEAR YOUR SEATBELT!

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