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The following is all Airbus but it would also be interesting to see other examples:

changed from 1972

AIRBUS 50: How the cockpits have changed from 1972

  • 28 May, 2019
  • SOURCE: Flight International
  • London

The Airbus ‘front office’ has undergone evolutionary and revolutionary changes since the original A300B1 cockpit of 1972. Here, we trace the flightdeck development story

A350

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A350: Airbus’s latest and greatest flightdeck arrived with the XWB in 2013. General layout remains faithful to original fly-bywire cockpit from 1987

Max Kingsley-Jones/FlightGlobal

A300B

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A300B: The original Airbus cockpit was one of the last “clockwork” designs and configured for three flightcrew. A later “Forward Facing” (FF) version of this layout was designed for two-pilot operation

Airbus

A310

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A310: Airbus’s first “glass” cockpit debuted on the A310 in 1982, evolving from the A300FF two-crew version. The A310 flightdeck was adopted for the improved A300-600 series

Airbus

A320

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A320: Airbus’s epoch-making fly-by-wire (FBW) cockpit changed the game in the 1980s with its clean six-screen configuration and sidesticks. The design has proven to be incredibly resilient, continuing largely unchanged on latest A320 and A330 models

Airbus

A330/A340

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The FBW cockpit was adopted for Airbus’s new widebody family in the early 1990s and continues on the latest A330neo (above) with new capabilities incorporated

Max Kingsley-Jones/FlightGlobal

A380

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A380: The ultra-large airliner brought the first major update to Airbus’s FBW cockpit. Introduced into service in 2008, this layout was basis for the A350 flightdeck

Airbus

A220

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A220: Airbus’s cockpit with a difference – the A220 began life as the Bombardier CSeries, joining the line-up when the programme was acquired in 2018. Like its Airbus siblings, FBW and sidesticks are the order of the day

Max Kingsley-Jones/FlightGlobal

Read every story celebrating the 50th anniversary of Airbus here

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I am told the A220 former CSeries is a nice combination of both Airbus and Boeing flight decks. The Bombardier engineers also spent a lot of time ensuring overhead indicator and switchlights were angled in such a way that pilots wont’t have to twist their necks or go ‘full recline’ to see something clearly. This is only one of many well thought out ideas designed into this Canadian made plane.

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The A350 has a rocker Trim switch on the centre console, ( no manual trim wheel), so the question is.....

How does one trim with no trim wheel in the event of a total electrical failure .....is trimming available with the RAT deployed ??

I don't see a manual trim wheel on the A220 either...

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3 hours ago, Kip Powick said:

The A350 has a rocker Trim switch on the centre console, ( no manual trim wheel), so the question is.....

How does one trim with no trim wheel in the event of a total electrical failure .....is trimming available with the RAT deployed ??

I don't see a manual trim wheel on the A220 either...

Re the A350, it appears that the Trimmable Horizontal Stabilizer is covered by the emergency electrical power system

 http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjxgojz9L7iAhVCGTQIHX3wBQsQFjABegQIBhAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.smartcockpit.com%2Fdocs%2Fa350-900-flight-deck-and-systems-briefing-for-pilots.pdf&usg=AOvVaw3KfeTiDV0CdbobHFKJCtKB

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Make everyone move to the tail of the airplane?  ?

The 777, 767, and 787 don’t have any trim wheels either.  They have two alternate trim levers.  Moved together they directly control the Stabilizer position.  

In a worst case scenario, it all electrical is lost, there are still backup cables attached to the Stab and selected spoilers to maintain control and level flight, until power can be restored via the RAT, APU, etc.  

Note, the 787 has two IDGs ( integrated drive generators)per engine and two on the APU.  In addition, the flight controls are driven by their own permanent magnet generators, backed up by 28 VDC.  It’s quite inconceivable that the 787 could have a complete electrical failure.

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