Air Canada To Purchase Air Transat


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AC should start offering ALL refundable fares.  Of course up the price by 10% as well.  See how the public reacts.  you can't have it both ways.

 

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... and there it is. The first slam at a group of hard working people who are just like the rest of us. They go to work each day and do their best to serve the customers. We should be better than this

I'm Clive Bedoe and I approve this message  

Worst. Thread. Drift. Ever ?

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Air Transat sets a date for resumption of operations

Published Thursday, June 11, 2020 7:55AM EDTLast Updated Thursday, June 11, 2020 8:42AM EDT

 

MONTREAL -- Transat AT Inc. plans to resume flights and tour operations starting on July 23 after grounding its aircraft earlier this year due to the pandemic and resulting border closures.

The Montreal-based tour company that owns Air Transat said Thursday it will begin a gradual resumption of operations with plans for 23 international routes over the summer as well as some domestic operations.

"With our Traveller Care program, we are implementing all the necessary protocols to safeguard our clients' health," Transat chief executive Jean-Marc Eustache said in a statement.

"This is a first step towards getting healthy operations back on track, from both a business and financial perspective."

Transat, which is in the process of being acquired by Air Canada, has suspended all of its flights since April 1.

The announcement of the plan to resume flying came as Transat reported a loss of $179.5 million or $4.76 per diluted share in the quarter ended April 30 compared with a loss of $939,000 or two cents per diluted share a year ago.

Revenue in what was the company's second quarter fell to $571.3 million compared with $897.4 million in the same quarter last year.

On an adjusted basis, Transat says it lost $38.8 million or $1.03 per share for the quarter compared with an adjusted loss of $6.4 million or 17 cents per share in the same quarter a year ago.

Air Canada's deal to buy Transat for $720 million has been agreed to by shareholders, but still requires regulatory approval in Canada and the European Union.

Last month, European regulators launched an in-depth investigation into the deal amid European Commission concerns it may reduce competition and result in higher prices.

A preliminary European Commission investigation worried the proposed deal could significantly reduce competition on 33 origin and destination city pairs between Europe and Canada.

These include 29 where both companies offer direct services and four where one company flies direct and the other one indirect via one of its hubs.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 11, 2020

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Transat announces the resumption of its operations as of July 23, 2020, and unveils its Traveller Care health and safety program

From Transat A. T. Inc

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/CNW Telbec/ – Transat A.T. Inc. is pleased to announce the resumption of its flights and tour operator activities as of July 23, 2020. It will offer a new flight schedule to 22 destinations in Europe, the South, the United States and Canada until the end of the summer season on October 31, 2020. The company will also offer South and Europe packages during this period and will gradually reopen travel agencies in its network starting June 15, 2020. In addition, Transat unveils its Traveller Care program, rolling out new health measures to ensure the safety of its customers and employees.

MONTREAL, June 11, 2020 “After these long months that put the entire tourism industry to the test, we are very happy to announce today the resumption of our operations,” says Annick Guérard, Chief Operating Officer of Transat. “We will gradually operate a flight schedule with 23 international routes to Europe, the South and the United States, in addition to a domestic flight schedule between major Canadian cities.

“To address the concerns caused by COVID-19 and to prioritize the safety of our customers and employees, we will be implementing new health measures as part of our Traveller Care program,” adds Guérard. “In compliance with the recommendations and requirements of regulatory authorities, these measures will accompany our travellers throughout their travel experience, from the travel agency to the airport to on board to the destination. We look forward to welcoming travellers again and to share the passion that unites us.”

Flights for summer 2020

Transat expects to resume its flights and tour operator activities as of July 23, provided that the travel restrictions applicable on that date allow it.

From Montreal, Air Transat will gradually operate direct flights to Athens (Greece), Bordeaux (France), Lisbon (Portugal), Lyon (France), Nantes (France), Marseille (France), Paris (France) and Toulouse (France). Travellers from Toronto will benefit from direct flights to Athens (Greece), Glasgow (Scotland), London (England), Manchester (England), Porto (Portugal) and Rome (Italy).

For travellers who wish to fly south, Air Transat will offer direct flights to Cayo Coco (Cuba), Cancun (Mexico), Fort Lauderdale (Florida) and Punta Cana (Dominican Republic) from both Montreal and Toronto, in addition to one direct flight a week to Port-au-Prince (Haiti) from Montreal.

To open the door to even more destinations via connecting flights and to allow Canadians to explore more of their country, the airline will also offer domestic flights between Montreal, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver.

Depending on demand and the easing of regulatory restrictions, Air Transat may enhance its flight schedule for the months of September and October. Customers are strongly encouraged to familiarize themselves with the governmental guidelines and entry requirements of their destinations, as they vary from country to country.

Flexibility offered to customers

Fully aware that travel plans can change, Transat is implementing a policy offering more flexibility to travellers whose flights are scheduled to operate this summer. Customers who booked before March 4, 2020, can change their travel dates, destination or package at no charge up to seven days before departure. If they prefer to cancel their trips instead, they will be able to obtain a travel credit valid for 24 months.

Customers who booked on or after March 4—the date Transat launched its “Book with peace of mind” policy—can make the same changes at no charge up to 24 hours before departure. If they prefer to cancel their trips instead, they will be able to obtain a travel credit valid for 12 months.

Passengers whose fare types allow for modification or cancellation will be able to benefit from those conditions if they wish to change or cancel a flight that is scheduled to operate this summer.

Temporary suspension of certain routes

COVID-19 and its impact on the tourism industry are forcing Transat to extend the suspension of some of its flights, significantly reduce its capacity and completely cancel certain routes for the 2020 summer season.

Until the end of the summer season, the airline is suspending its flights to certain destinations in Europe (Amsterdam, Basel-Mulhouse, Barcelona, Brussels, Copenhagen, Dublin, Faro, Lamezia, Madrid, Malaga, Nice, Prague, Venice and Zagreb), the South (Cayo Largo, Holguin, Montego Bay, Puerto Plata, Puerto Vallarta, Roatan, Santa Clara, Samana and Varadero) and the United States (New Orleans, Orlando and San Diego). It is also suspending all its direct flights to Europe and the South from Vancouver and Quebec City. Customers affected by these cancellations will receive a travel credit for the value of the amount received on file, which they can use within 24 months of their original return dates.

New health and safety program: Traveller Care 

Transat also unveils today its Traveller Care health and safety program. Based on the recommendations of regulatory authorities, the travel experience has been completely revised: at the travel agency, at the airport, on board and even at destination.

  • At travel agencies: Clients will be encouraged to make an appointment before presenting themselves at a branch; there will be a limit of one client per consultation; and Plexiglas partitions will be installed at travel agents’ desks.
  • At the airport: To limit the risk of spreading the virus, certain measures will be implemented at the airport. Among these, passengers will be asked health-related questions, and counters and self-service kiosks will be regularly disinfected.
  • On board: All necessary precautions will be taken to provide a safe inflight experience. Frequently touched cabin surfaces will be thoroughly cleaned with hospital-grade disinfectant before each flight, and the aircraft will be thoroughly cleaned with electrostatic disinfectant every 24 hours. Passengers will receive a complimentary Traveller Care kit (including a face covering, gloves, hand sanitizer and disinfecting wipes). Passengers and crew will be required to wear face coverings throughout the flight. And the inflight service will be revised to reduce handling and contact. In addition, on board all Air Transat aircraft, passengers can count on reliable HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters, which eliminate 99.995% of small particles, such as bacteria and viruses, refreshing cabin air every three minutes.
  • At destination: Reinforced preventive measures during transfers and excursions will be put in place for customers who have purchased a South or Europe package. In addition, Transat’s hotel partners will be implementing rigorous health and safety protocols so that travellers can enjoy their vacations with complete peace of mind. To provide support at destination, Transat representatives will be available at all times, by phone or via the Air Transat app.

For details on the measures featured in Transat’s Traveller Care program, travellers can consult airtransat.com/traveller-care. The flight schedule for the 2020 summer season and other flight details can be found at airtransat.com/resumption-of-our-operations.

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Air Transat gradually resuming flights - Flight attendants remain concerned about their job future


NEWS PROVIDED BY

Canadian Union of Public Employees (FTQ) 

Jun 11, 2020, 16:56 ET

 

  •  

MONTREAL, June 11, 2020 /CNW Telbec/ - Transat A.T., which stopped flying on April 1 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, announced today its plan to start resuming flights on July 23, pending the relaxation of travel restrictions.

The union representing Air Transat flight attendants views this as excellent news. However, these recalls to work will affect only a small minority of its members. For the vast majority, returning to work could be a matter of months or even years.

"We expect that only 250 of the 2,000 flight attendants will return to work when flights resume. Considering the impact of the pandemic on our industry, we hope that flight attendants will not be forgotten by Canadians, and we call upon the government to take action to protect these jobs," said Julie Roberts, union president of the Air Transat Component of CUPE.

Today, to ensure that the flight attendants are not forgotten, CUPE's Air Transat Component launched a campaign aimed at the Federal Government and the Canadian public, demanding concrete actions, as it is essential that jobs in the airline sector be preserved. We should not forget that flight attendants have always been committed to the safety of Canadians, particularly during the repatriation flights at the start of the crisis in March.

To view the campaign videos: https://bit.ly/2zoUfrv

Air Transat flight attendants are emergency specialists whose primary role is to ensure passenger safety. They are divided into three local unions, corresponding to their three bases: CUPE 4041 (Montreal-YUL), CUPE 4047 (Toronto-YYZ) and CUPE 4078 (Vancouver-YVR). The Air Transat component oversees these three local unions.

In total, CUPE represents nearly 15,000 members in air transportation in Canada, including Air Transat, Air Canada, Air Canada Rouge, Sunwing, CALM Air, Canadian North, WestJet, WestJet Encore, Flair Air, Swoop, Cathay Pacific and First Air, Air Georgian.

With nearly 122,000 members in Quebec, CUPE is present in 11 sectors, including social services, communications, education, universities, energy, municipalities, government corporations and public agencies, air and land transport, the mixed sector and maritime transport. It is the largest affiliate of the FTQ.

SOURCE Canadian Union of Public Employees (FTQ)

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For further information: Ronald Boisrond, Communications - SCFP, 514 802-2802

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https://scfp.qc.ca/

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21 hours ago, Marshall said:

Air Transat gradually resuming flights - Flight attendants remain concerned about their job future


NEWS PROVIDED BY

Canadian Union of Public Employees (FTQ) 

Jun 11, 2020, 16:56 ET

 

  •  

MONTREAL, June 11, 2020 /CNW Telbec/ - Transat A.T., which stopped flying on April 1 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, announced today its plan to start resuming flights on July 23, pending the relaxation of travel restrictions.

 

"We expect that only 250 of the 2,000 flight attendants will return to work when flights resume. Considering the impact of the pandemic on our industry, we hope that flight attendants will not be forgotten by Canadians, and we call upon the government to take action to protect these jobs," said Julie Roberts, union president of the Air Transat Component of CUPE.

Today, to ensure that the flight attendants are not forgotten, CUPE's Air Transat Component launched a campaign aimed at the Federal Government and the Canadian public, demanding concrete actions, as it is essential that jobs in the airline sector be preserved. We should not forget that flight attendants have always been committed to the safety of Canadians, particularly during the repatriation flights at the start of the crisis in March.

 

That's weak imo, CUPE.  Surely they can up with something better than that.

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In my opinion, CUPE is weak almost by definition. It is not a "trade union" in the traditional sense. It is nothing more than a bargaining agent using a company's own employees at the table. It seems as though there is an inherent conflict in purporting to represent the employees of competing companies. 

I don't know that much about unionism but understand there are many trades that are organized based on skill set and not employer. If Company A needs a pipefitter, it contacts the union hall and the next person up goes to the job. When work is plentiful, travellers are permitted. When your assignment is complete, you go back to the list. The union is representing ALL pipefitters regardless of current employer.

So....if you were, for example, a Canadian flight attendant, you were across the table and not on the same side as an Air Canada flight attendant though you belonged to the same union. And given the airline industry, what could be more likely than industry consolidation and corporate mergers? So....as CUPE, whose interests do you prefer or do you just step aside; do a soft shoe shuffle; and, collect the dues?

The same was/is true of ALPA. In my opinion, the pilots of Air Canada are best served by their own union representing their interests without regard to the " welfare" of pilots with other airlines whose right of fair bargaining puts the union in conflict. 

 

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I agree with CUPE's lobbying of the government to work towards a situation where airlines can operate viably again, but I don't understand the notion that airline crews who got paid to work repatriation flights should somehow be regarded as heroes.  We all had the option not to work if we didn't feel safe working.

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On 6/12/2020 at 9:31 PM, UpperDeck said:

In my opinion, CUPE is weak almost by definition. It is not a "trade union" in the traditional sense. It is nothing more than a bargaining agent using a company's own employees at the table. It seems as though there is an inherent conflict in purporting to represent the employees of competing companies. 

I don't know that much about unionism but understand there are many trades that are organized based on skill set and not employer. If Company A needs a pipefitter, it contacts the union hall and the next person up goes to the job. When work is plentiful, travellers are permitted. When your assignment is complete, you go back to the list. The union is representing ALL pipefitters regardless of current employer.

So....if you were, for example, a Canadian flight attendant, you were across the table and not on the same side as an Air Canada flight attendant though you belonged to the same union. And given the airline industry, what could be more likely than industry consolidation and corporate mergers? So....as CUPE, whose interests do you prefer or do you just step aside; do a soft shoe shuffle; and, collect the dues?

The same was/is true of ALPA. In my opinion, the pilots of Air Canada are best served by their own union representing their interests without regard to the " welfare" of pilots with other airlines whose right of fair bargaining puts the union in conflict. 

 

It is the difference between a TRADE union and an Labour Union.  As you describe a Trade Union represents a particular Trade. A labour union represents a work force.

 

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Transat-Air Canada merger pushed to fourth quarter

By Pilar Wolfsteller11 June 2020

  •  

Transat AT, the parent company of Canadian holiday specialist Air Transat, says its merger with Air Canada is still on track and now due to close in the fourth quarter of 2020.

Montreal-based Transat says on 11 June that it is “firmly committed to completing the transaction”. But, it adds that factors “beyond its control” and related to the global coronavirus pandemic have delayed the tie-up, which received overwhelming approval by shareholders last year.

Originally, the merger with fellow Montreal-headquartered Air Canada had been scheduled to close in the second quarter.

Air Transat new livery 111317-640px

Source: Air Transat

Transat-Air Canada merger pushed to fourth quarter

“The market conditions of the global industry have been completely transformed. Among other things, the vast majority of North American, European and international air carriers have announced reductions in capacity and requested financial assistance measures,” Transat writes on 11 June. “This could impact the possibility of reaching an agreement with regulatory authorities regarding an appropriate package of remedies aimed at obtaining the necessary approvals.”

The merger has been under scrutiny for quite some time from various regulatory agencies.

The European Commission announced on 25 May that it will undertake an in-depth investigation that will not be complete until at least October. In March, Canada’s competition watchdog, the Competition Bureau of the government of Canada, also said it was taking a closer look at the transaction after expressing “competition concerns”.

“If the required approvals are obtained and the conditions are met, it is now expected that the arrangement will be completed during the fourth quarter of the 2020 calendar year,” Transat says. “Under the arrangement agreement, the deadline for obtaining the regulatory approvals cannot be extended beyond December 27, 2020.”

Last August, Transat’s shareholders approved Air Canada’s C$720 million ($530 million) takeover bid for the company. That calculates out to C$18 per share. The transaction, if approved, would merge the number one and number three airlines in the Canadian market.

Calgary-based WestJet, Canada’s second-largest airline, said earlier this year it was watching the transaction closely, fearing the merger would skew competition to overseas destinations.

Earlier this month, reports emerged in French-Canadian media that Air Canada was looking to exit the deal due to liquidity issues following the sharp decline in demand as the coronavirus brought air travel to a near-standstill in April. These reports were not confirmed.

Transat also says on 11 June that it expects to resume flights and tour operator activities on 23 July, pending the easing of travel restrictions in the countries to which it flies. It suspended operations on 1 April.

The airline anticipates it will fly a reduced schedule until the end of October, service 20 destinations, including 13 in Europe, five in the United States, Mexico and Caribbean, as well as some domestic connections. It will then expand its schedule with additional frequencies and destinations “based on border openings and de-confinement measures in place”.

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13 hours ago, boestar said:

It is the difference between a TRADE union and an Labour Union.  As you describe a Trade Union represents a particular Trade. A labour union represents a work force.

 

Boestar....I'm sorry but where did you come up with that distinction? A trade union is defined in the Canada Labour Code. There is no reference to a " labour union".

See Berry v Pulley ( SCC) where CALPA is in fact referenced as a " trade union".

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1 hour ago, UpperDeck said:

Boestar....I'm sorry but where did you come up with that distinction? A trade union is defined in the Canada Labour Code. There is no reference to a " labour union".

See Berry v Pulley ( SCC) where CALPA is in fact referenced as a " trade union".

Labour organizations in Canada  https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/services/collective-bargaining-data/labour-organizations.html

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10 hours ago, UpperDeck said:

Boestar....I'm sorry but where did you come up with that distinction? A trade union is defined in the Canada Labour Code. There is no reference to a " labour union".

See Berry v Pulley ( SCC) where CALPA is in fact referenced as a " trade union".

I’ve heard the two terms used somewhere before... it might be a British thing... foggy memory this morning... 

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yeah it may not be written in Canadian Law but thats how they were defined.

Trade Union representing everyone in a single trade Like the Pipe Fitters or Stone Masons. You want a Fitter you called the union and got a fitter and you payed him the going union rate.

Later on we ended up with union representing entire labour forces consisting of different trades and positions. The contract spelled out the agreed upon rates for each position as agreed by both parties.  This actually weakened the unions somewhat because they no longer controlled the rates but this is where we are today for the most part.  

There are still many Unionized Trades out there that work for the union and not the company to which they are providing services.  but not as common as it once was.

 

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10 hours ago, boestar said:

yeah it may not be written in Canadian Law but thats how they were defined.

Trade Union representing everyone in a single trade Like the Pipe Fitters or Stone Masons. You want a Fitter you called the union and got a fitter and you payed him the going union rate.

Later on we ended up with union representing entire labour forces consisting of different trades and positions. The contract spelled out the agreed upon rates for each position as agreed by both parties.  This actually weakened the unions somewhat because they no longer controlled the rates but this is where we are today for the most part.  

There are still many Unionized Trades out there that work for the union and not the company to which they are providing services.  but not as common as it once was.

 

Actually, there is a VERY long history to craft ( trade) unionism which might reasonably include lawyers, doctors, pilots ....and pipefitters. Labour unionism is ( I think) more recent and more associated with industry-wide representation than with the protection of "trades" or crafts.

Regardless, I am simply suggesting that a union purporting to represent similarly defined bargaining units in different and competing companies is in a position of inherent conflict.

CALPA purported to represent pilots and negotiate on their behalf when some units were with different "mainline" companies and others were with " regionals" whereas ACPA represents only those pilots on the Air Canada pilot seniority list.

Similarly, CUPE represents Westjet, Air Canada, Transat ( etc) flight attendants who are or will be in conflict if/when consolidation occurs. How does the same union represent effectively those competing interests?

The express policy of the airline division of CUPE as of 1999 was that any merger of flight attendant seniority lists would be based upon date of hire. One year later following the merger of CAIL and Air Canada.....CUPE went silent and failed to defend ( or support) that policy.

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51 minutes ago, UpperDeck said:

Actually, there is a VERY long history to craft ( trade) unionism which might reasonably include lawyers, doctors, pilots ....and pipefitters. Labour unionism is ( I think) more recent and more associated with industry-wide representation than with the protection of "trades" or crafts.

Regardless, I am simply suggesting that a union purporting to represent similarly defined bargaining units in different and competing companies is in a position of inherent conflict.

CALPA purported to represent pilots and negotiate on their behalf when some units were with different "mainline" companies and others were with " regionals" whereas ACPA represents only those pilots on the Air Canada pilot seniority list.

Similarly, CUPE represents Westjet, Air Canada, Transat ( etc) flight attendants who are or will be in conflict if/when consolidation occurs. How does the same union represent effectively those competing interests?

The express policy of the airline division of CUPE as of 1999 was that any merger of flight attendant seniority lists would be based upon date of hire. One year later following the merger of CAIL and Air Canada.....CUPE went silent and failed to defend ( or support) that policy.

Great Post

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9 hours ago, UpperDeck said:

Actually, there is a VERY long history to craft ( trade) unionism which might reasonably include lawyers, doctors, pilots ....and pipefitters. Labour unionism is ( I think) more recent and more associated with industry-wide representation than with the protection of "trades" or crafts.

Regardless, I am simply suggesting that a union purporting to represent similarly defined bargaining units in different and competing companies is in a position of inherent conflict.

CALPA purported to represent pilots and negotiate on their behalf when some units were with different "mainline" companies and others were with " regionals" whereas ACPA represents only those pilots on the Air Canada pilot seniority list.

Similarly, CUPE represents Westjet, Air Canada, Transat ( etc) flight attendants who are or will be in conflict if/when consolidation occurs. How does the same union represent effectively those competing interests?

The express policy of the airline division of CUPE as of 1999 was that any merger of flight attendant seniority lists would be based upon date of hire. One year later following the merger of CAIL and Air Canada.....CUPE went silent and failed to defend ( or support) that policy.

It is al a change in the way things were done.  Companies as well as unions figured they could get a better deal by dealing with only a single entity.  It likely worked but not for both parties.

ACPA and CALPA as an example.  The AC figured they could do better alone instead of with a broader group.  Did it work?  Depends who you ask.  but for the industry as a whole, I would say the split was detrimental.

In the "Trade Union" example the wages of the entire group are defined by the union.  If the company needs a pilot they pay the rate.  Period.  It would be up to the Union to define what a Bush, Regional, Airline pilot are worth.  As a Whole it is better for the ENTIRE Pilot group.

I guess it depends on how selfish you are in the end.

 

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12 hours ago, UpperDeck said:

Similarly, CUPE represents Westjet, Air Canada, Transat ( etc) flight attendants who are or will be in conflict if/when consolidation occurs. How does the same union represent effectively those competing interests?

And the Maintenance people are represented by the IAMAW at both AC and Transat. Same concerns. When AC "merged" with Canadian, it was the same thing, with the IAM representing both groups.  It did not turn out well for the Canadian guys in that case...

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On 6/17/2020 at 9:49 AM, conehead said:

And the Maintenance people are represented by the IAMAW at both AC and Transat. Same concerns. When AC "merged" with Canadian, it was the same thing, with the IAM representing both groups.  It did not turn out well for the Canadian guys in that case...

and again to my point.  The IAMAW also represents the Baggage and Ramp personnel.  Whose interests are better served?
 

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On 5/16/2019 at 9:01 AM, boestar said:

OHHHH the implications...

AT will provide AC with the ability to do Maintenance anywhere it wants and wiggle around other provisions of the ACPPA.  Leave AT in Quebec and then move AC anywhere it wants.  

This could be a very good move for AC.

 

Thread drift? Lol

Please take a look at the first page of posts. Implicit is the concern as to how the operations of the two companies would merge and how that would impact upon labour.

Hollis Harris said that the most significant element in any merger was not the financial implications per se but the impact upon labour relations often felt decades after the merger itself.

Many on this forum are retired from the airline industry but I assure you that the potential impact of a merger is very much on the minds of some active employees.

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  • 2 months later...

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - EU antitrust regulators have resumed their investigation into Air Canada's proposed acquisition of rival Canadian carrier Air Transat and set a deadline of December 11 for a decision.

The European Commission, which oversees competition policy in the 27-member European Union, suspended its investigation in June as it waited for the companies to provide certain data.

The Commission opened an in-depth study of the planned C$720 million ($552.8 million) acquisition in May, saying it had concerns that it would result in higher prices and less choice for flights between Europe and Canada.

A filing by the Commission showed that the suspension had now ended and that a December 11 deadline had been set.

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I cannot believe that the EU can have any input at all on how private companies are run in Canada.  We are not an EU member and there is plenty of choice from the EU for flights to and from Canada.  Why do we bow down to this crap.

 

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