Sign in to follow this  
Malcolm

Driverless Snow Plow Plus topic drift into Pensions

Recommended Posts

‎Today, ‎March ‎15, ‎2019, ‏‎6 minutes ago
 

Winnipeg Richardson International Airport Unveils North America’s First Autonomous Airport Snowplow

 
‎Today, ‎March ‎15, ‎2019, ‏‎10 minutes ago | Canadian Aviation News

Provided by Winnipeg Airport Authority Inc/CNW

WINNIPEG, March 14, 2019 /CNW/ – Today, Winnipeg Richardson International Airport introduced ‘Otto’, the first autonomous airport snowplow in North America. The plow is the result of a partnership with Manitoba companies Northstar Robotics Inc. and Airport Technologies Inc. (ATI).

‘Otto’ is a specially designed ATI Snow Mauler configured to operate autonomously using Northstar Robotics technology. The plow performs snow clearing tasks by following predetermined routes and controlling the plow blade at specific locations.

A shot of North America's first autonomous airport snowplow, Otto. (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.) A shot of North America’s first autonomous airport snowplow, Otto. (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.) A shot of North America's first autonomous runway snowplow, Otto at Winnipeg Richardson International Airport (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.) A shot of North America’s first autonomous runway snowplow, Otto at Winnipeg Richardson International Airport (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.) Otto, North America's first autonomous airport snowplow, at Winnipeg Richardson International Airport. (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.) Otto, North America’s first autonomous airport snowplow, at Winnipeg Richardson International Airport. (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.) Shawn Schaerer, President and Founder of Northstar Robotics, a company partner in this venture. (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.) Shawn Schaerer, President and Founder of Northstar Robotics, a company partner in this venture. (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.) Vince Dancho, WAA's Senior Vice President introducing Otto, North America's first autonomous airport snowplow. (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.) Vince Dancho, WAA’s Senior Vice President introducing Otto, North America’s first autonomous airport snowplow. (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.) Airport Technologies Inc.'s President, Brendon Smith. (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.) Airport Technologies Inc.’s President, Brendon Smith. (CNW Group/Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.)

Today marks a significant milestone for the project, as the vehicle can now operate autonomously in less complex areas of the airport. Research and development continue, with the next step being the operation of the plow in additional areas of the airport.

Otto is equipped with 3D LIDAR and RADAR that can sense its surroundings and detect obstacles.  The plow is also equipped with a fault tolerant wireless emergency stop system, a further safety enhancement. 

“Launching North America’s first autonomous snowplow is a great achievement for Winnipeg Richardson International Airport,” said Barry Rempel, President and CEO of Winnipeg Airports Authority. “Our success is a direct result of bringing together partners who are committed to lead transportation innovation and growth.”

“Autonomous technology is changing how we work,” added Shawn Schaerer, President and Founder of Northstar Robotics. “It is exciting to partner with companies that are ready to adapt and pioneer this cutting-edge technology.”

“ATI is proud to be part of the team breaking new ground in snow clearing technology,” said ATI’s President, Brendon Smith. “We are excited to continue to find new ways to incorporate autonomous technology into our equipment.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if it goes as fast as the manned ones at YYZ.  Those guys are hazardous to anyone else driving on the ramp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Fido said:

A complete waste of times, money, and effort

why? Perhaps there would be a labour cost saving due to no need to pay regular or overtime wages,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Malcolm said:

why? Perhaps there would be a labour cost saving due to no need to pay regular or overtime wages,

Be careful what you wish for. Eventually we’re going to automate ourselves into bankruptcy and there will be no one left to fund those pesky pensions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Malcolm said:

why? Perhaps there would be a labour cost saving due to no need to pay regular or overtime wages,

would that have been offset by the R&D required as well as cost of maintenance and operation?  Cost recovery is likely a very long time

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm guessing the R&D delta would be relatively low.  The remote drive by wire is already proven in settings like de-icing trucks, the navigation would actually be far easier than for city streets as the airport is defined, confined and controlled.  You might need a LIDAR for surprises like wildlife but you might not need stuff like agile collision avoidance or pedestrian handling.

Then there is the concept of 'driverless'.  I'm thinking the thing is monitored with remote takeover possible 100% of the time.

Vs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, boestar said:

ding one airplane and the costs go out the window.

 

as can be said for all other vehicles operating airside. 

 

3 hours ago, boestar said:

would that have been offset by the R&D required as well as cost of maintenance and operation?  Cost recovery is likely a very long time

 

I will leave that up to the experts who authorized the trial.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, J.O. said:

Be careful what you wish for. Eventually we’re going to automate ourselves into bankruptcy and there will be no one left to fund those pesky pensions.

Quote

Automation promises to be one of the great social challenges of our generation. The fear that robots will steal our jobs is an old one. But it’s being felt all the more acutely thanks to the rise of new technology.

What’s often overlooked is the role that tax policies play in this. Current policies in many countries, including the US and UK, encourage automation even when it would not otherwise be efficient. Plus, the switch to automation also dramatically reduces the government’s tax revenue because fewer human workers mean fewer tax contributions. This means that any attempt to deal with the rise of robots will be inadequate if it fails to consider the tax implications.

'Why we should start taxing the robots that are taking human jobs'

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Airband said:

Using USA for example.....

Births in 2018...........over 3.8 million

Deaths in 2018.....  approx 2.6 million

In 20 years many of the difference,  (1.2 million...not factoring in that many of the deaths would be retirees and the elderly so not in the workforce)), could be seeking employment and with the increase in automation, not find work, and thus the social system, (tax dollars), will have to look after those that can not acquire employment.

A partial fix would be to restrict the size of an American family...perhaps 2 children max..... a rather radical approach, ( the Chinese have used it), but it is being discussed with parental organizations on the fringe of the American society.

Edited by Kip Powick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, J.O. said:

Be careful what you wish for. Eventually we’re going to automate ourselves into bankruptcy and there will be no one left to fund those pesky pensions.

You know pensions are self-funded, right? I.E. No contributions = no pension.

BTW, someone has to build, maintain, program, dismantle, and dispose of the robots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Kip Powick said:

Using USA for example.....

Births in 2018...........over 3.8 million

Deaths in 2018.....  approx 2.6 million

In 20 years many of the difference,  (1.2 million...not factoring in that many of the deaths would be retirees and the elderly so not in the workforce)), could be seeking employment and with the increase in automation, not find work, and thus the social system, (tax dollars), will have to look after those that can not acquire employment.

A partial fix would be to restrict the size of an American family...perhaps 2 children max..... a rather radical approach, ( the Chinese have used it), but it is being discussed with parental organizations on the fringe of the American society.

You have to be careful venturing into that area as to who is currently producing large families.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Rich Pulman said:

You know pensions are self-funded, right? I.E. No contributions = no pension.

Tell that to Sears employees (and plenty of others).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, J.O. said:

Tell that to Sears employees (and plenty of others).

and that is why DC is better than DB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, boestar said:

and that is why DC is better than DB.

Apologies for the thread drift...

A properly run DB is always better than a DC.  The operative phrase is 'properly run'.  It is when the thieves, like Conrad Black, want to steal the profit out of it that trouble starts.  A quick study of all failed pensions are usually a case of management or investors raiding the pensions and dumping the carcass on the government.

A DC pension is better for the institutions because they can charge higher fees.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On that note My DC I have now performs better than the DB where I used to be BY FAR.  Mainly because I get to choose the investment portfolio.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, deicer said:

A properly run DB is always better than a DC.  The operative phrase is 'properly run'. 

In my case, I agree,....I know a few folks where their DC was run by an idiot and they lost a very significant amount..... both plans are totally acceptable, but must be Properly Run..

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like self directed myself.  no one to blame but me if i perform poorly.  I don't like letting other look after MY money.  Fortunately, for a moron, I have managed it pretty well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this