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Air Canada flight slides off runway at Halifax Stanfield

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‎Yesterday, ‎March ‎4, ‎2019, ‏‎7:35:41 PM
 

Air Canada flight slides off runway at Halifax Stanfield

 
‎Yesterday, ‎March ‎4, ‎2019, ‏‎7:30:49 PM | Canadian Aviation News

News provided by The ChronicleHerald

Andrew Rankin (arankin@herald.ca) on 4 March 2019

Air Canada Flight 614 slid off the runway at Halifax Stanfield International Airport Monday night. - Eric Wynne Air Canada Flight 614 slid off the runway at Halifax Stanfield International Airport Monday night. – Eric Wynne

It was the flight that Stephanie Ray and her twins won’t soon forget.

“When it was all over I sent my husband a text saying, ‘Thank goodness, this could have ended up so much differently.’

“The captain was very calm and the entire crew did a great job.”

Her children Skyler and Storme McNeil sat safely beside her aboard Air Canada Flight 614 on Monday night at about 9 p.m. The plane had slid off a runaway at Halifax Stanfield International Airport and had come to rest in a snowbank, she said. The trio had been waiting to deplane for about two hours, after travelling most of the day from Victoria, B.C.

The Chronicle Herald could not immediately reach anyone for comment at the Halifax airport. But the airport’s Twitter account did confirm an incident did occur on the runway.

Runway 05/23 currently closed due to aircraft from arriving flight AC 614 unable to make it to gate. TSB advised and sending a local team to assess. AC may choose to deplane passengers & transport to terminal in interim. More info posted as available.

Halifax Stanfield✔@HfxStanfield

Ray said that nobody appeared to be hurt but several people were rattled by the incident

“It was quite rough coming in. They engaged what I thought was the brakes full on and the plane started turning.

“A lot of women were crying. There was no big bang but it was a bit scary initially.”

She said the runway was closed following the landing. She said buses were in the process of being sent to the plane to deliver passengers to the airport.

CBC reported Monday night that flight operations resumed at the airport by about 8:30 p.m.

Multiple flights unable to land at Halifax due to 100% iced-over runways, now diverting to Fredericton and Ottawa. Controllers just joked there isn’t enough hotel space in Fredericton to hold the swarm of passengers unexpectedly now spending the night there.3:39 PM – Mar 4, 2019T

James Collins@JamesCollinsNS

Appears there’s an Air Canada 767 stuck on the runway at Halifax. Tried to exit to taxi but couldn’t move, and then started sliding sideways. Trucks en-route. @CBCNS @chronicleherald 3:23 PM – Mar 4, 2019T

ames Collins@JamesCollinsNS
 

TSB deploys a team of investigators to a landing incident at Halifax Stanfield International Airport, Nova Scotia

 
‎Yesterday, ‎March ‎4, ‎2019, ‏‎7:22:13 PM | Canadian Aviation News

Provided by Transportation Safety Board of Canada  /CNW

Dartmouth, NS, 4 March 2019 /CNW/ – The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is deploying a team of investigators to Halifax Stanfield International Airport, Nova Scotia, following a landing incident involving an Air Canada Boeing 767. The TSB will gather information and assess the occurrence.

The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

The TSB is online at www.tsb.gc.ca. Keep up to date through RSSTwitter (@TSBCanada), YouTubeFlickr and our blog.

SOURCE Transportation Safety Board of Canada

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Air Canada pilot orders 23 pizzas to Halifax-bound plane stranded on tarmac

Passengers on a delayed Air Canada flight are praising their captain to the skies after he went out of his way to keep them informed - and even ordered pizza directly to their plane stuck on the tarmac.

Plane diverted to Fredericton after it couldn't land during poor weather in Halifax

 
shaina-luck.jpg
Shaina Luck · CBC News · Posted: Mar 05, 2019 1:20 PM AT | Last Updated: an hour ago
 
pizza-plane-air-canada-fredericton-halif
An Oromocto, N.B., restaurant delivered 23 large pepperoni pizzas to passengers stranded on an Air Canada flight at the Fredericton airport. The pilot picked up the bill. (Shutterstock/Bill Karsten/Twitter)

Passengers on a delayed Air Canada flight are praising their captain to the skies after he went out of his way to keep them informed — and even ordered pizza directly to their plane stuck on the tarmac.

Air Canada Flight 608 left Toronto on Monday afternoon bound for Halifax. It circled the Halifax airport Monday evening but was unable to land due to poor weather. The airport temporarily shut down its runways after another plane slid while taxiing and couldn't make it to the gate.

The Airbus A320 diverted to Fredericton, where its passengers ended up sitting on the tarmac for some time because other aircraft had also landed there and the airport was busy.

That's when staff at Minglers Restaurant and Pub in Oromocto received a call directly from the cockpit of the airplane. 

"We do a catering business here too, so we're used to unusual numbers, but I mean on a storm night? For a plane? No," said owner Roch Larivée.

Larivée said when the call came in the snowstorm that hit the region Monday was winding down, and there were only three staff members working in the kitchen at Minglers. But they quickly prepared 23 large cheese and pepperoni pizzas and sent them to the airport.

"I hope everybody enjoyed their pizzas," Larivée said Tuesday.

Passengers were on the Airbus A320 plane for roughly eight hours without any food service after boarding in Toronto. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press)

Back on the plane the hot pizza was very welcome, said passenger Philomena Hughes, who was travelling back home to Halifax after visiting her parents in Ontario.

Hughes estimates people were in the plane for roughly eight hours after boarding in Toronto. She credits the pilot for keeping them informed as well as fed. The plane had a capacity of more than 150 passengers, but it was not a flight that included any meal.

"It was something that could have been very stressful; he made it a lot easier," she said. 

"They looked like they appreciated the pizza … they were pretty calm and pretty cheery," she said. "It makes such a difference when you know what's going on."

Passenger Bill Karsten, who is a municipal councillor in Halifax, tweeted a picture of the pizza arriving. Karsten said the flight had been delayed even before leaving Toronto but the captain went out of his way to explain to each of the passengers what was happening. 

"He walked entirely down the length of the plane just to make sure we knew what was going on and whatnot, before departing to Halifax. So I think the mood was set, in reality, by the great work of the captain," Karsten said.

Hughes said even after the flight was over the captain checked in with the passengers, but was quick to give credit to the rest of the flight crew as well.

"He wanted everyone to know that it was the whole crew, that he couldn't have done it without the crew. There was lots of help, there were a couple of Air Canada Jazz pilots that were travelling on the plane and they were helping to pick up the pizza and distribute it. Everybody chipped in, so he didn't want to take the whole credit for himself," she said.

Passengers on the flight were scheduled to fly from Fredericton to Halifax Tuesday afternoon.

This is not the first time airline employees have used pizza to express goodwill. In 2017, a WestJet pilot bought pizza for stranded airline passengers, and during the U.S. government shutdown earlier this year Canadian air traffic controllers sent pizza to their American counterparts

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I wonder what it's going to take for the airport authority in YHZ to start funneling some of those AIF funds toward better winter maintenance and infrastructure, instead of baubles and beads.

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" That's when staff at Minglers Restaurant and Pub in Oromocto received a call directly from the cockpit of the airplane. "

Oromocto? WHAATT??? That's in Fredericton! Is there another Oromocto in the vicinity of CYHZ???

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1 hour ago, Moon The Loon said:

" That's when staff at Minglers Restaurant and Pub in Oromocto received a call directly from the cockpit of the airplane. "

Oromocto? WHAATT??? That's in Fredericton! Is there another Oromocto in the vicinity of CYHZ???

The pizza was delivered to the diverted flight that was waiting in Freddy, not the one that slid off the runway in Halifax.

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5 hours ago, moeman said:

The pizza was delivered to the diverted flight that was waiting in Freddy, not the one that slid off the runway in Halifax.

I guess I failed that RTFQ test!

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I was gonna say...I cant even order a pizza to the airport hilton in YHZ.

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On 3/5/2019 at 11:13 AM, rudder said:

Did they get stuck exiting runway 23 at Charlie?

I think the headline is a little misleading. I’m sure the taxiway was worse than the runway and then the ‘off roading’ began. 

I know airport snow removal crews focus on runway surfaces but if a commonly used exit results in parking an airplane in the snow and closing the active, perhaps some extra time should be spent on those taxiway exits. And of course pilots have to remember to go slow too. 

Edited by blues deville

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My understanding that while the airplane was still on the runway, it weathervaned on the 100% ice covered runway.  They hadn’t reached the turnoff yet.  The pilots were along for the ride.

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17 minutes ago, Homerun said:

My understanding that while the airplane was still on the runway, it weathervaned on the 100% ice covered runway.  They hadn’t reached the turnoff yet.  The pilots were along for the ride.

Oh! Well that’s not great to hear. How recent was the last runway inspection?

Years ago on a VRA-YHZ night flight knowing Halifax would be a skating rink at our ETA, operations still said it was a go. Took lots of fuel and we had a Transat flight on the same route right behind us. In range of YHZ the tower controller said airport crews were trying to treat the runway but it was just blowing sideways and not hitting the surface. TS went to YQB and we got a night in YYT. 

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1 hour ago, Homerun said:

My understanding that while the airplane was still on the runway, it weathervaned on the 100% ice covered runway.  They hadn’t reached the turnoff yet.  The pilots were along for the ride.

An aircraft will only ‘weathervane’ with loss of directional control when the crosswind limits are exceeded. 

Sounds like the RSC was grossly inaccurate or the wind conditions changed rapidly. Knowing CYHZ, it was the former.

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If an airline had this many "common theme" events is such a short amount of time, TC would put them on their heightened oversight list. I wonder if YHZAA is getting the same consideration? 🧐

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16 hours ago, rudder said:

An aircraft will only ‘weathervane’ with loss of directional control when the crosswind limits are exceeded. 

Sounds like the RSC was grossly inaccurate or the wind conditions changed rapidly. Knowing CYHZ, it was the former.

Depends on the plane.  I have had 2 occurrences of weathervaning  on 2 different aircraft types while parked.  A 727-200 on the gate rotated (thankfylly) away from the gate about 6 feet and a 767-200 again while parked rotated almost 90 degrees.  in both cases wind speeds were in the 30-50 mph range.  Also on DRY pavement.  on ice I would expect a lesser wind to have an effect.

 

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29 minutes ago, boestar said:

Depends on the plane.  I have had 2 occurrences of weathervaning  on 2 different aircraft types while parked.  A 727-200 on the gate rotated (thankfylly) away from the gate about 6 feet and a 767-200 again while parked rotated almost 90 degrees.  in both cases wind speeds were in the 30-50 mph range.  Also on DRY pavement.  on ice I would expect a lesser wind to have an effect.

 

Gt 71 at old T2 comes to mind, it happened there all the time even when triple chocked.  '47s on the other end at 105 as well.

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Weathervaning is a function of the friction coefficient vs perpendicular wind speed.

Low friction coefficient and high wind speed means tires will not hold aircraft in place.

Can occur in motion or stationary. I have seen it on an iced ramp.

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I have seen it on a dry ramp on a chocked aircraft.  De-icer nailed it for one of my occurrences but the other was at the old T1 in YYZ.   Had I walked only a little bit slower down the bridge I may have gone for the ride or fallen to the pavement. 

Point is that given the correct conditions a weather vane event can happen anywhere.

Once upon a time we had a pilot claim that an accident during pushback (which caused extensive damage) was caused by "Frozen GLYCOL".

While that was not exactly a weather vane event, it was due to a loss of friction between the nose wheel and the ground (as well as excessive thrust on the port engine)

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Although anecdotal at best, I have noted the tendency of (dare I say) newer pilots to stop flying the airplane after the nose wheel touches down. Maybe I have it wrong, but I stand as a proponent of controls into wind, judicious differential braking (based on observed effect) and early (yet gentle) application of reverse.... increased slowly.

Early selection of control locks and immediate entry into aggressively applied reverse is just uncomfortable and scary to me on a slippery runway; it reminds me of Dante’s assertion to abandon all hope.   

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