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Malcolm

Two Kenya Airways Embraer 190s have been badly damaged

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  • Kenya E190s collide during maintenance mishap

Kenya E190s collide during maintenance mishap

  • 09 February, 2019
  • SOURCE: Flight Dashboard
  • BY: David Kaminski-Morrow
  • London

Two Kenya Airways Embraer 190s have been badly damaged during a ground collision following a mishap during maintenance.

The airline states that the accident occurred at night on 8 February, during a routine engine maintenance check at a Nairobi airport hangar.

One of the aircraft – for reasons yet to become clear – began to move, and collided with another of the same type.

Neither aircraft was in operation at the time, says Kenya Airways, and “no passengers were involved”.

It adds that none of the maintenance personnel suffered injuries during the accident.

Images circulating on social media purporting to show the scene of the collision identify the aircraft as 5Y-KYR and 5Y-FFF.

The geometry of the aircraft in the photographs indicates that 5Y-KYR struck the nose of the other jet, knocking off its radome, and came to rest with its forward fuselage crumpled and pierced. The starboard General Electric CF34 engine of -KYR also rammed the forward fuselage of -FFF.

Both aircraft have received “substantial damage”, says the carrier, and been withdrawn from service pending examination. The images also show a damaged ground-support unit underneath the wing of -KR.

Flight Fleets Analyzer lists -KYR as a 2011 airframe, leased from Nordic Aviation Capital, while -FFF is younger, built in 2013, and owned by an entity called Samburu.

The airline has not indicated whether either aircraft was occupied by crew or maintenance personnel at the time of the accident.

“Both [aircraft] were scheduled to return to service in the next few days,” says the airline, adding that it will advise passengers if there is any disruption to its operations.

Once investigators have completed inspections of the jets for their inquiry, it adds, repairs will begin.

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“The airline states that the accident occurred at night on 8 February, during a routine engine maintenance check at a Nairobi airport hangar”.

Is there anything special to know about the parking brake function on this aircraft? 

I don’t know the history of this technique but my 777 line training included letting the park brake handle ‘snap’ against its panel’s metal like a beaver tail alerting the pond. It is more of a lever design than a handle and I suppose the sound generated by the metal on metal left no doubt that the parking brake was released. Of course the EICAS would also indicate its status. Not a procedure I fully agreed with but someone must have had a problem and like all SOP evolution this became the required method. However, setting the park brake is still a pilot required action and there are no noises to remind you. 

Edited by blues deville

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There is a limitation/caution on the 330 of thrust limit with the park brake on. I believe this was the result of an “incident” in Vancouver a few years ago with an a310 during a static run up.

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24 minutes ago, st27 said:

There is a limitation/caution on the 330 of thrust limit with the park brake on. I believe this was the result of an “incident” in Vancouver a few years ago with an a310 during a static run up.

And don't forget the A340 in Toulose about 15 years ago. The airplane was destroyed in the incident.

https://www.pprune.org/rumours-news/300539-brand-new-etihad-a340-600-damaged-toulouse-several-wounded.html

Edited by Moon The Loon

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The parking brake selector handle in the Embraer is very similar to those we are familiar with in a car, the type that is immediately to the right of the Capt’s seat, and you pull up to activate.  There’s been a couple of incidents of the aircraft landing with this activated, with ensuing damage to the tires and wheel assemblies.  One of them with JetBlue, I believe...

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