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Malcolm

On the Way to the 2019 Federal Election

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10 hours ago, Marshall said:

Strange, the coupon is good in BC and Alberta.  According to McDonalds, the same deal (2 can dine is 11.78) in Toronto. At your local 

the big mac meal is quoted at 7.50 (regular rate, no discount). that is why the $14.00 quote seems to be out of the norm.  By the by when the Big mac, chips and a drink was under $1.00, I was making 300.00 a month. 

https://www.zomato.com/toronto/mcdonalds-downtown-yonge/menu#tabtop

Skip the dishes for the Mcdonalds in Toronto is quoting 9.75 for the big Mac meal deal.  https://www.skipthedishes.com/mcdonalds-skymark-avenueimage.png.a0df3e61cff21aa492ed4c8df69b977a.png

Plus tax….

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19 hours ago, Marshall said:

Strange, the coupon is good in BC and Alberta.  According to McDonalds, the same deal (2 can dine is 11.78) in Toronto. At your local 

the big mac meal is quoted at 7.50 (regular rate, no discount). that is why the $14.00 quote seems to be out of the norm.  By the by when the Big mac, chips and a drink was under $1.00, I was making 300.00 a month. 

https://www.zomato.com/toronto/mcdonalds-downtown-yonge/menu#tabtop

Skip the dishes for the Mcdonalds in Toronto is quoting 9.75 for the big Mac meal deal.  https://www.skipthedishes.com/mcdonalds-skymark-avenueimage.png.a0df3e61cff21aa492ed4c8df69b977a.png

 

The price does not matter.

People will pay that and more.

The latest at the elementary school my grand-daughter attends is that mothers who 'don't have time' to make a kids lunch just telephone Skip the Dishes to order something from a fast food joint and have it delivered to the school office for them.

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26 minutes ago, Fido said:

 

The price does not matter.

People will pay that and more.

The latest at the elementary school my grand-daughter attends is that mothers who 'don't have time' to make a kids lunch just telephone Skip the Dishes to order something from a fast food joint and have it delivered to the school office for them.

My reaction was not the price but the quote that the price had gone from $1.00 to $14.00 and why.  I think you have hit the nail on the head, the price is what it is because of an overall culture change.  

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A good summation warts and all of the Liberals.  Will try to post the other parties when they are published.

https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/zmj39w/liberal-party-profile-everything-you-need-to-know-about-voting-for-justin-trudeau

This is the first in a series of political party profiles for the 2019 Canadian federal election.

It’s hard not to think of the Liberal Party’s campaign slogan “Choose Forward” as a thinly veiled plea for the public to stop revisiting Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s political headaches.

The SNC-Lavalin scandal dominated Canadian politics this year and struck a recent blow to the Liberals after Ethics Commissioner Mario Dion concluded last month that the prime minister violated the Conflict of Interest Act by pressuring former attorney general and justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould to intervene in a case against the Quebec construction giant.

 

The Liberals then used their majority on the House ethics committee to prevent Dion from testifying about his findings.

Trudeau swept into power in 2015 after campaigning on progressive rhetoric about the environment, feminism, and Indigenous issues. He initially appointed about half of his 31 cabinet to women, famously saying that he did so “because it’s 2015.”

But on the election trail in 2019, Trudeau have to contend with criticisms that the Liberals have failed to deliver on a number of his promises. Steering the conversation away from this mess means talking about how bleak things will be if the Conservatives win.

Economy and jobs

Both Trudeau and Conservatives’ Leader Andrew Scheer have put themselves forward as true champions of the Canadian “middle class.” Scheer says Trudeau can’t possibly relate to that segment of society since he grew up rich. Trudeau says Scheer is only interested in giving corporations and wealthy people tax cuts while diminishing Canada’s social safety net.

The Liberals have already lowered the tax rate from 22 to 20.5 per cent for those earning between $45,282 and $90,563, a change that the Department of Finance says has saved nine million people hundreds of dollars a year.

The Liberals are sure to continue touting how, statistically, about a million more Canadians are working now compared to four years ago. Trudeau will certainly repeat how low Canada’s unemployment rate is when he’s been PM. But these numbers don’t include those who’ve stopped looking for work, as well as those in precarious working situations that don’t offer a true living wage or socioeconomic stability.

Telling voters how amazing things are can easily translate into a disconnect when it comes to those who feel like they’re not doing so well. Increasing the Canada Child Benefit and capping monthly smartphone bills are likely to play a central role in Trudeau’s pitch to the middle class.

The Liberals are also going to increase the carbon tax yearly by $10 per ton, starting at a 20$/ton base. In Ontario, Manitoba, New Brunswick and Saskatchewan, this means the average household pays about $10 more per month for natural gas. Gasoline goes up about four cents a litre and about three cents for propane. These numbers will go up as the carbon tax increases each year, although the party has aggressively promoted the fact that Canadians can claim a carbon tax rebate every year.

 

Environment

Trudeau’s international image as a progressive leader rests a lot on his rhetoric about addressing climate change and environmental disaster. At home, the Liberals have tried to position themselves as the only party capable of balancing environmental protection with energy and economic development.

The Liberals have been touting their record since taking power: the carbon tax (a favourite target of the Conservatives), a ban on oil tankers off the B.C. coast, the implementation of a carbon-limited fuel standard, and funding public transportation. Those on the left have criticized Trudeau’s handling of the carbon tax for taking it too easy on industry and not charging enough per ton of carbon produced.

The Liberals don’t have a complete platform and have said that its energy strategy will be an ongoing “dialogue,” not a concrete document. They bought and approved the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, pointing to how it’ll help Western Canada access markets other than that of the U.S. They’ve also poured a lot of money into B.C.’s LNG project, which they say will run on “clean hydroelectricity.” This is a cleaner form of energy but the natural gas industry still accounts for about 20 percent of B.C.’s greenhouse gas emissions.

The Liberals have also tried to reduce carbon production by bringing in a new fuel standard for fuel used in heating homes and transportation. Their “Incentives for Zero-Emissions Vehicles Program” helped increase the number of electric car sales/leases by 30 percent.

Crime and Security

The Liberals have not campaigned much on tough-on-crime issues. Trudeau has generally stuck to the rhetoric of making sure to balance security with civil liberties.

 

Under Trudeau, Public Safety Canada listed the first white supremacist groups onto its list of terrorist entities. This was after a 2018 report by Public Safety was called out by numerous civil society groups for overlooking the threat of far-right, white-supremacist violence in Canada. The National Council of Canadian Muslims (NCCM) argued that the report improperly magnified the threat of Muslim and Sikh terrorism. The government ended up dropping the term “Sikh terrorism” altogether.

The Liberals also pushed through Bill C-59 last year, which overhauled some of Canada’s national security laws. The Liberals promised that the bill would fix certain provisions in Bill C-51, passed by Conservatives in 2015.

The Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) concluded that C-59 has improved oversight of the government’s national security agencies. But it also created new issues, such as essentially permitting large-scale surveillance and expanding the mandate of several agencies. This includes giving the CSE, Canada’s signals intelligence agency, powers to conduct offensive and defensive cyber operations, thus endorsing state-sponsored hacking with minimal oversight.

The Liberals have also promised to strengthen Canada’s Coast Guard by spending spending just under $16 billion on a fleet of new ships. This is done as part of the National Shipbuilding Plan to help revitalize Canada’s marine industry, as well as to renew a rusty fleet of ships that the Coast Guard currently uses.

 

Indigenous Affairs

The Liberals don’t have a full platform for this file yet but have promised to align Canada’s commitments to Indigenous nations with the United Nations’ Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

NDP MP Romeo Saganash introduced a private member’s bill (Bill 262) to have Canada legally bound to the declaration, but that’s not likely to succeed. The declaration is technically a non-binding document that affirms Indigenous people’s rights to give “Free, Prior, and Informed” consent for any projects to commence on their land. How it actually plays out, if implemented, will mainly be up to the courts to define.

Indigenous voters turned out for Trudeau in 2015 partly due to his sweeping promises, from launching an inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG), to addressing the prolonged water crisis on reserves.

They are likely to be disappointed. Numerous issues (and resignations) plagued the MMIW inquiry, including Indigenous voices revealing the lack of consultation with their communities. VICE has also covered extensively how the Liberals have fallen short in providing reserves with clean water. For example, the Trudeau government said they essentially solved the issue with their investments. But a VICE fact check revealed that several reserves still suffered from chronic issues like power outages, underfunding, delays, and other breakdowns.

The disappointment perhaps culminated last when the government bought the Trans Mountain pipeline for $4.5 billion. Some Indigenous nations, along with advocacy groups, even took their complaints to court as the PM defended the purchase by pointing to his record on the environment.

 

Healthcare

Trudeau announced in June that his party was committed to instituting a national pharmacare program that extends prescription drug coverage to all Canadians. This proposed system would cover a shorter list of “essential medicines” in 2022 and expanded year after year. The specific list hasn been made yet but the Liberals promise that it’ll be a “carefully chosen list” that covers “most major conditions and representing about half of all prescriptions.”

The 2018 budget also included a number of investments in mental health, including for youth. The Liberals invested $5 million to address and prevent bullying and cyberbullying. It also put money into addressing the mental health of first responders, veterans, and on Indigenous reserves.

The Liberals have campaigned by depicting the Conservatives as wanting to cut social and healthcare services at every turn. But several provinces, including Quebec, thought Trudeau’s Liberals didn’t live up to his 2015 promises of negotiating with provinces about healthcare funding.

They felt the Trudeau Liberals provided them with an “ultimatum” that included a clampdown in increases of health-transfer payments, from a six per cent annual increase down to three per cent.

Drugs

The Trudeau government has legalized and regulated cannabis but will not decriminalize other illicit drugs. It has also eased some restrictions around opening up safe, supervised consumption sites.

 

But deaths due to opioid overdoses have increased under Trudeau. The Liberals have since announced a fund to help provinces and territories treat those addicted to opioids, but has not declared the crisis a “national emergency,” as the NDP has urged them to.

Student Issues

The Liberals raised the minimum annual income someone must make before having to start paying off their student debt, to $25,000.

They’ve also written off hundreds of millions of dollars in student loans in the past four years.

The Liberals’ 2019 budget made a number of moves to increase funding for Indigenous students and students with disabilities, while reducing the interest charged on loans.

Miscellaneous

Party sources have said that the Liberals are set to make promises to cut cell phone and Internet bills. The could be a cap on how much can be charged or having large providers offer access to smaller outfits without their own telecommunications infrastructure.

Best case scenario

Roughly tied with the Conservatives going into the election, Trudeau finds some of that 2015 magic on the campaign trail and Andrew Scheer proves to be dull and gaffe-laden. Ontario and Quebec largely go Liberal, with the Conservatives losing the Toronto suburbs thanks to Doug Ford, and a weakened NDP ceding seats to the Grits in Quebec. The Liberals lose a couple seats in Atlantic Canada but largely sweep it. Western Canada is still a losing cause but they mostly maintain their seats there. If the Liberals can get young voters out again, and the Conservatives fail to make a dent in Ontario, Trudeau could easily win another majority, albeit a smaller one, even if they just have a narrow popular vote victory.

 

Worst case scenario

Trudeau embarrasses himself in the debates with Andrew Scheer and Liberal voters, particularly young people, stay home, while the Conservatives reveal a stronger than expected ground game, especially in Ontario. The Tories win an extremely narrow majority and Trudeau steps down instead of serving as Opposition Leader.

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1 hour ago, deicer said:

Worst case scenario

Trudeau embarrasses himself in the debates with Andrew Scheer and Liberal voters, particularly young people, stay home, while the Conservatives reveal a stronger than expected ground game, especially in Ontario. The Tories win an extremely narrow majority and Trudeau steps down instead of serving as Opposition Leader.

This section was titled incorrectly...should read IDEAL SCENARIO

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Odd in the Vice article there wasn’t mention of the deficit and Trudeau’s promise to balance the budget in 2019....after years of deficits in Ontario, voters woke up and Wynne was turfed ... we will see if there is a similar reaction on the federal scene or will it take another 4 years of spending money we haven’t got.

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He purported to be taking responsibility, but he called the brownface he wore in that shocking Time Magazine photo “makeup.”

No sir.

Makeup is what people wear to enhance or improve the look of their skin. Makeup is what even I might wear to a wedding this weekend.

Brownface ain’t makeup. Brownface is having a laugh at someone with dark skin.

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau has confessed to two incidents of such “makeup” wearing — one when he was in high school and sang The Banana Boat song, or Day O, by the great Harry Belafonte; the other of course the ghastly picture of Trudeau, in turban and brownface, that was published late Wednesday by Time Magazine.

In the picture, a dark Trudeau hand is splayed comfortably on the upper chest of whom I presume was a pretty colleague at West Point Grey Academy, the posh private school in Vancouver where Trudeau worked as a teacher.

Even last week, when Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer refused to walk back comments he’d made about how “a single group of people” or one Indigenous group could “hold hostage” a pipeline that would greatly benefit many Indigenous groups, Trudeau was there to soberly shake his head in sadness and “deplore his perspective and the language he used.”

This is not how Trudeau has acted to the gaffes and mistakes of others

 
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He is always quick to judge others, condemn them, and always with that rich Trudeau smarminess.

In other words, it’s his hypocrisy that is so galling.

 

Quote

As Sukhi Sandhu, a community activist in Surrey, B.C., and a former vice-president of the B.C. chapter of the federal Liberal party, says furiously, “Immigrants have suffered from many types of institutionalized racism, while contributing to the community.” What they get in return, at least from the Liberals, he says, is exploitation and pandering.

As a leader with the Wake Up Surrey group, which is trying to fight the gun and gang violence rife in the city, Sandhu has been banging on doors in Ottawa for much of the past year to no avail.

“If we want to talk about anything other than diversity and immigration,” he says, “we get nowhere.

“Justin Trudeau is a fake, and for the first time in 30 years, I will not be voting Liberal.”

So, Trudeau can regret what he did, and say (a nice common touch) that he’s “**bleep** off” at himself, but as he kept talking Wednesday night, it was clear — by the references to brownface as makeup, by several allusions to the picture happening many years ago — that he was cutting himself the slack he has denied to so many others. He’s different, you see. He can judge the rest of us harshly, but not himself.

 

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/christie-blatchford-in-cutting-himself-slack-its-trudeaus-hypocrisy-that-is-so-galling

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Just Imagine the CBC or CTV or the Trudeau Star headlines if this was Scheer !! All hell would be breaking loose !!  

Then again...” 'People experience things differently “ which is Trudeau Speak for ....

 “Hey, judge, I thought she liked it. I can’t help it if we saw things differently

9A25CD5B-FC24-4806-8D33-0031FDBEF5BF.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee

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Trudeau bashed from as far away as Australia...yet the Canadian media love him....amazing what a mere 600,000,000 can buy !!

 

 

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21 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

Just Imagine the CBC or CTV or the Trudeau Star headlines if this was Scheer !! All hell would be breaking loose !!  

I was thinking the exact same thing ONLY because of the hypocrisy and NOT because of the incident itself.

JT is no more a racist than Shear is a white supremacist AND EVERYONE KNOWS IT.  But, by their own liberal definitions and liberal narratives we now have a racist PM who has admitted to ongoing genocide. I await hysterical screams of "oh ya, well what about this" from the base.... it will likely take some time, but in the end it will be Harper's fault. 

 

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McLeans Magazine

 

Justin Trudeau’s face

Paul Wells: The Liberal campaign is built around a sophisticated oppo research organization that says their opponents are bad people. Where does it stand now?

 

You’ll be relieved to know Justin Trudeau will be talking to his children about all this.

The Prime Minister will, he told reporters at the back of the Liberal tour plane in Halifax, be telling his children that when you make a mistake you need to own up to it.

I don’t know whether he’ll tell them it’s a good idea to wait 18 years and only commence the owning-up once the nature and details of your error have been published in Time magazine—or whether, yet again, he’ll be holding others to higher standards than he holds himself.

The mistake in question—he was the only person who showed up in brownface makeup to a theme party at the ritzy Vancouver private school where he was a teacher in 2001—is of the general class of error that one would probably have thought about in the intervening years. (What reaction did he get? Did the other faculty think he was being hilarious? Did they edge away as gently as possible? Did they talk about him later?) And perhaps Trudeau thought, when Virginia’s governor faced calls for resignation over his own blackface yearbook photo, that this was something he should discuss with senior staff. But no.

To his credit, once he was caught, Trudeau was contrite this time. Usually he doesn’t even bother. When he contravenes the conflict-of-interest law to take a fun family vacation with a billionaire spiritual leader, it’s just that we don’t understand he has nice friends. When he sends wave after wave of medium-quality enforcer to pressure his own attorney general to cancel a criminal trial for a well-connected engineering firm, it’s just that she isn’t a team player.

Grading the former teacher on the curve, we see he is finally showing signs of real improvement. “Admit it was bad when they publish the photos” is a big step up from “Eject her from the party and run a candidate against her.” He even volunteered that he had had some practice with the technique, donning blackface for a rendition of Day-O (The Banana Boat Song) while a student at Montreal’s intellectually rigorous Jesuit Collège Jean de Brébeuf high school in the 80s. (“There is no specific dress code,” the school’s Wikipedia page points out.) So for one of his ventures into minstrelsy, he actually decided not to wait for publication. Progress. But of course, in Canada better is always possible.

READ MORE: Riding the bus with Justin Trudeau

Those of you still on Twitter had seen every possible reaction long before I could write this. That if Trudeau were a simple riding-level candidate instead of an incumbent prime minister, he’d have been stripped of the right to run before you could see the photo. (True.) That if he’d been the leader of the Conservatives, there’d be an emergency meeting of some high-level faction in the party to prepare to demand he resign. (Hard to know, but plausible.) That what he’d done was worse than/ nowhere near as bad as what Andrew Scheer’s candidates have done. (That one’s for you to weigh by your own lights.) That attitudes toward blackface are a little different in Quebec. (Former colleague Martin Patriquin has tackled that one more than once.)

I’ll note only that until Wednesday night, the Liberal campaign was a two-level operation of a sophistication I’ve rarely seen before. The front man for the campaign has been Trudeau, touring the country making bland little announcements of no conceivable incidence on the lives of most Canadians ($50,000 startup grants for 2,000 entrepreneurs, for instance, in a country with 1.1 million small businesses). On the rare occasions when he permitted himself to be bothered by reporters’ questions, his smirky non-answers were of Teflon quality and ensured that no useful information would escape from the travelling bubble in which a large sample of the nation’s political journalists remained safely ensconced.

The Trudeau tour, it turns out, has been a modern parallel to the ghost armies the Allies sometimes deployed a lifetime ago as a feint to confuse the enemy. The bulk of the Liberal campaign effort has been held back, well away from the leader tour, and has taken the form of a constant barrage of oppo research deployed against Conservative candidates. I called an acquaintance at Liberal HQ about this the other day, and was rewarded with a summary of this campaign’s successes to date. The Conservative candidate in York Centre wants to “end abortion,” Carolyn Bennett tweeted. The Brampton North candidate was homophobic on Facebook years ago. A candidate outside Ottawa is “bothered” by “the Quebec people”  and is right-wing hate-clown Faith Goldy‘s “best friend.” And on. And on. And on.

The depth and breadth of this oppo campaign is formidable, and I finally realized why it seemed familiar when I recalled that among the senior Liberal campaign staff are campaign director Jeremy Broadhurst and rapid-response lead Brian Clow, both veterans of the two-year campaign to save NAFTA. Colleague Nick Taylor-Vaisey wrote compellingly about that complex, layered effort while it was happening. There’s something about the NAFTA campaign in all this: the way dozens of staff members and elected Liberals have been conscripted to it; the tight message control; the sheer relentlessness. I actually suspect that in some corner of it, the Liberal campaign’s fondest hope is that this values barrage will serve as the template, not just for beating Andrew Scheer, but for beating Donald Trump and congressional Republicans in 2020. The whole plan, after all, germinated on a Halifax stage a year and a half ago when Gerry Butts and David Axelrod pondered their continental mission in front of an audience that included Justin Trudeau.

The front for the Liberal campaign has been Trudeau making a frankly listless and uninteresting argument about good governance and affordability. The bulk of it has been a country-wide values argument from which the leader was carefully insulated, but executed on his behalf, and its message has been: These are bad people we are running against. They don’t deserve your vote.

Where does that campaign stand now? “If everyone who is going to be standing for office needs to demonstrate that they’ve been perfect every step of their lives, there’s going to be a shortage of people running for office,” Trudeau said tonight. Yet another idea that doesn’t seem to have occurred to him until just after somebody at Time hit PUBLISH.

 
’m not sure this should work the way Cold War prisoner exchanges worked—send one Trudeau across the bridge in return for a dozen or two Conservative candidates, call it a wash. That’s too easy for all concerned. I think it’s fairer to say, most of the things you ever did that sound appalling now were appalling then, and you deserve to have a terrible time living with them. But also that people change. People grow. Justin Trudeau’s career has been based on claiming that simple fact for himself and denying it to his opponents. Will that stop now? Of course not. It’s how he’s wired.

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23 minutes ago, Jaydee said:
The Liberal campaign is built around a sophisticated oppo research organization that says their opponents are bad people. Where does it stand now?

 

This is the underlying problem with the narrative that some of us (here) have railed against. Anyone suggesting that JT is actually a racist is only supporting their own narrative and, in the process, missing an opportunity to see how limiting and silly it is. Perhaps this will serve as a lesson to all of the screamers, and perhaps it will focus the election on issues of substance.

But stay tuned for reaction from the base, I predict they will be "disappointed" and not "offended". If that proves true, consider it a missed opportunity that will only serve to re-energize polarization and elevate the fallacy of relative privation (in liberal rhetoric) to new heights.

Edited by Wolfhunter

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Good morning Wolfhunter

I agree with your first point.  What people are failing to remember is that over time social mores and what is acceptable changes.  While I am not agreeing with what was done, my point is that back 'our' day, (50's, 60's, 70's) who didn't play cowboys and Indians?  Who didn't dress up as a female at one point for Halloween, who didn't make fun of the rare 'coloured' kid at school?  Who didn't play on a sports team with an indigenous name?

There used to be smoking everywhere.  Planes, trains, theatres, grocery stores, everywhere...

What used to be the norm then is no longer the norm.  We learn, we advance, we change.

So my question is this...

What is the statute of limitations?  

This isn't murder we're talking about.  It is society.  

So a person did something that is considered wrong now back then.   I believe the measuring stick it how has that person changed and what is their behaviour now?  If one learns from past mistakes and then goes on to not do those things, and actually tries to improve on the wrong, can you say they are truly remorseful?  Isn't that the way that we feel about alcoholics and drug addicts who are clean and sober yet have to daily face their past?

To me there is a difference if someone did this 20-30 years ago and has shown they have changed as opposed to someone who is still carrying on with that sort of behaviour currently.

There will be outrage over this, there will be chest thumping, but like you said, we have to get past the narratives to see the substance.

I for one shake my head at this and the other incidents like it.  It creates too much noise that distracts from the more important issues like actual economic policies, health care and education.

Just too much distraction.

 

 

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Where is Ahmed Hussen???? Not a word about him in the election campaign.....will he be able to stand beside his leader now?? I’ll bet all will be forgiven in the liberal cabinet “for the sake of the party”... more like “for the sake of our jobs”.

And to diecers points...I agree except that Trudeau was 29 when he was “dressing up”. And more importantly is there a pattern of hypocrisy here: 

womens rights —— he fires a cabinet minister because she stands up/disagrees with his agenda.

womens respect—- assaults women at festival event and explains that people experience things differently

indigenous rights—- mocks protesters at a liberal dinner for a few laughs

diversity—- this blackface event

ethics—- twice being found guilty by the ethics commissioner of violations and not agreeing with the findings

The message of the current government has taken a big hit and he has lost a credibility big time.

 

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