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Malcolm

On the Way to the 2019 Federal Election

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If you only looked at what Justin Trudeau and the Liberals are saying, you would come away with the impression that there’s no such thing as “Canada,” and that we actually live in the United States.

After all, the Liberals seem intent on campaigning as if they’re running against US Republicans, rather than Canadian Conservatives, New Democrats, and Greens.

Trudeau has tried bringing up abortion, Liberal Ministers have brought up “Russian misinformation,” gun control, and “white nationalism,” all in what is an obvious attempt to copy the talking points of US establishment media, and pretend that there’s no difference between Canada and the US.

It is an incredibly cynical and deceptive strategy, which ironically serves to dilute Canadian identity and draw us into the division and political disputes we see in our neighbours to the south.

Making matters worse, on the issues in which Canada and the US should be aligned—like confronting Communist China or building up our military forces—the Trudeau government is absent.

So, our government is exacerbating the drawbacks of being close to the US, while ignoring and bypassing the benefits.

This is very unfortunate because it comes at a time when Canada is increasingly divided, with separatist sentiment growing in the West, and Canadian Conservatives being relentlessly demonized by the Trudeau Liberals.

For the government to add to that demonization by pretending that there’s somehow no separation between US and Canadian politics will only further deepen the anger, resentment, rage, and division in our country, at a time when we need the exact opposite.

And all of this is taking place amid the background of a nation that is being deprived of our national identity by a government that seeks to make us a “post-national state.”

To try and suppress Canada’s identity, while simultaneously transplanting American political issues into a different Canadian context, is a dangerous move.

Unfortunately, the Trudeau government is aided in this effort by the fact that US media is so widely consumed in Canada, and they are playing on that fact to try and muddy the waters.

That’s why Canadians need to remember that, despite our many similarities with the US, we are a sovereign and unique nation, and our political context is unique to our own country, just as the US political context is unique to theirs.

While we are all free to talk about US politics, and while what happens in the US certainly impacts our lives as Canadians, our leaders need to be focused first and foremost on their real job: Serving Canadian Citizens.

https://www.thepostmillennial.com/why-do-the-trudeau-liberals-keep-pretending-theyre-american/

Edited by Jaydee

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Shade from the potted plants

Marginalized Liberal MPS opt out of re-election

  • Calgary Herald
  • 10 Aug 2019
  • National Post jivison@postmedia.com Twitter.com/ivisonj
img?regionKey=vsCiGMJZGciF4ueR7AMXpQ%3d%3dCHRIS WATTIE / REUTERS FILES Longtime PMO aides Katie Telford and Gerald Butts were regulars at Liberal caucus meetings, which ‘put a chill’ through those in attendance, according to an unnamed Liberal MP.

Living in the political limelight is the dream job for those who wish to be seen — it’s clean, it’s indoors and there’s no heavy lifting involved.

But for those who want to get stuff done, life in the House of Commons can be pretty frustrating.

Eighteen Liberals, 15 Conservatives and 14 New Democrats have decided they have had enough of the Theatre of the Absurd and are not standing for re-election. Those numbers are not out of whack with previous elections — except for the NDP, which has lost a third of its caucus.

What is curious is the number of members of the governing party who are quitting after just one term in office, despite there being every prospect Justin Trudeau will win again in October.

For some, the love affair with politics has curdled because their ambitions have been thwarted. But for others, disillusionment centres around the disconnect between the House of Commons and the people of Canada.

There is a belief among some departing MPS that the promise made by the Trudeau Liberals that they would be the voice of their riding in Ottawa, rather than the other way around, has been broken.

“I don’t feel we have lived up to that,” said one Liberal MP who has decided not to run again. He said he has become disenchanted over the course of the past four years by the regimented nature of party politics in Ottawa.

“Stephen Harper centralized power into the Prime Minister’s Office, but I don’t think this prime minister has done anything to change that. I thought I would have a lot more of a say. But a lot of decisions are made by non-elected officials,” he said.

One particular concern I have heard time and again from Liberal MPS is the presence of PMO staff taking notes at caucus meetings.

Both chief of staff Katie Telford and former principal secretary Gerald Butts were regulars at caucus, the preserve of elected MPS during the Chrétien years (Ian Brodie, Harper’s first chief of staff, did attend caucus — but at the prime minister’s insistence).

The Liberal MP, who asked not to be named, said the presence of senior staff “put a chill” through caucus. “Trudeau might have forgotten if someone spoke at the mic and said something he didn’t like, but those people have long memories,” he said.

His frustration was not limited to caucus meetings. He said the committee system is structured to keep MPS busy but they rarely manage to change legislation that has emerged fully formed from the Prime Minister’s Office.

In addition, most government MPS revile question period. As one parliamentary secretary said: “When the House is sitting, I have 30 hours of wasted time every week, if you include question period, which I do. I have to squeeze in everything else around this parliamentary stuff.”

Another said that he was prepped for question period by his minister’s communications team. “I was force-fed lines to memorize. I felt ridiculous reading the lines in the House. It is BS for soundbites. It may be relevant to people in ministers’ offices but for most Canadians, it’s ridiculous.”

There have been periodic attempts to make Parliament more relevant to Canadians. The Liberals might claim their efforts to change procedures in the House in 2017 were geared to that end, though in truth it was a power grab designed to neuter the opposition parties and speed government bills through the legislative process.

An effort by Quebec Liberal MP Frank Baylis earlier this year had cross-bench support but ultimately died on the order paper, as the successful businessman decided not to run again. Baylis’s private member motion on democratic empowerment suggested a number of changes, ranging from allowing petitions with 70,000 signatures to trigger debates in the House, to an increase in the number of hours a week devoted to private members’ business.

The reality is all such efforts are doomed because it’s not in the interests of any Canadian prime minister to devolve power from the centre.

Trudeau claimed that rule by cabinet was back when he was elected. That is not how it has worked out, according to any number of Liberal MPS. “Too much power is centralized — way, way, way too much power,” said one senior member of caucus who is running again.

That’s yet another sign that the Trudeau pledge to “do politics differently” was misleading and that the advertising was better than the product.

It appears to be confirmation of the “Savoie thesis” — the idea promoted by academic Donald Savoie that cabinet and caucus are just sounding boards for prime ministers who pay more attention to selected courtiers.

That may be inevitable when it comes to governing a modern G7 nation. As Eddie Goldenberg, Jean Chrétien’s former adviser, explained in his book, The Way It Works, the government in which he was a key player tried to engage cabinet in decision-making but quickly concluded ministers were so focused on their own departments they gave little thought to the big picture.

Inevitable or not, it is a development that has provoked a number of able backbenchers to resolve that playing the part of a bobblehead in question period, or a potted plant behind some prime ministerial announcement, is not the best use of their talents.

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From my wife, coffee buddies and relatives I keep hearing about US politicians and when a name is mentioned I ask "Who is that?".

I don't care as it does not affect me.

Edited by Fido
  • Thanks 1

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4 hours ago, Fido said:

From my wife, coffee buddies and relatives I keep hearing about US politicians and when a name is mentioned I ask "Who is that?".

I don't care as it does not affect me.

I feel the same way but  the reality is,   they will affect us in Canada, but  as there is nothing I can do that will influence them, ,    I concentrate on   our upcoming Federal Election.

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12 hours ago, Marshall said:

I concentrate on   our upcoming Federal Election.

There are probably close to 5000 members on this forum and it seems less than a dozen care about Canada’s future. I really wish more people on this forum took an interest.

 Seems very few are aware the future of this country is at stake if Trudeau is re-elected. The Canada as we knew it will be forever gone as 4 more years of his socialism will finish it off once and for all.

 

71 days left until Canadians get the opportunity of a lifetime to eradicate Socialism/Liberalism from the face of Canada once and for all.

Edited by Jaydee

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Another “diversity is our strength” moment :

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/quebec-city-man-charged-woman-set-on-fire-1.5243285

 

Not the headline Trudeau wants publicized as he wishes a certain group :

The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today issued the following statement on Eid al-Fitr:

“Tonight at sunset, Muslims in Canada and around the world will celebrate Eid al-Fitr.

“Eid al-Fitr marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan. After a month of fasting and spiritual reflection, Eid is a time for community and celebration.

“This festival is also a chance to honour the values at the heart of Islam – from service and generosity to peace and compassion. Whether it’s volunteering at a food bank or supporting local charities, Muslim Canadians show us the best of those values, all throughout the year.

“Today, let’s celebrate the many contributions Muslim Canadians make to our country. Our government will always stand with Canada’s Muslim communities. We will continue to fight against Islamophobia and hatred in all its forms, and together, we’ll keep building a better Canada.

“On behalf of our family, Sophie and I wish all those celebrating a joyful Eid.

“Eid Mubarak!”

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10 minutes ago, st27 said:

today issued the following statement on Eid al-Fitr:

Today is Eid al Adha.

Eid al Fitr was back in May

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Ok...more pandering to diversity:

PRIME Minister Justin Trudeau on Saturday issued the following statement on Eid al-Adha:

“Today, Muslims in Canada and around the world mark the end of the Hajj and celebrate Eid al-Adha, also known as the Feast of Sacrifice.

“Eid al-Adha is a time for families and loved ones to come together to pray, share a meal, and celebrate life’s blessings.

“It is also a chance to reflect on values like community service, compassion, and generosity. Whether supporting a local charity or being there for neighbours in need, Muslim Canadians show us the best of those values all year round.

“Today, let’s celebrate Canada’s Muslim communities, and the many contributions they make to shape our country for the better.

“On behalf of our family, Sophie and I wish all those celebrating a wonderful Eid al-Adha.

“Eid Mubarak!”

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“ Dief’s jowls jiggled. His brows bristled.

“I’ve always been fond of dogs,” the Conservative leader declared, and the assembled media throng — the ones who had just informed him that Gallup had him losing, badly, to the Liberals — leaned ever closer.

“And they are the one animal that knows the proper treatment to give to poles.”

The ink-stained wretches burst out laughing, and scribbled away in their notebooks. Dief the Chief had conjured a political quote for the ages.

He was sort-of right, too, about the polls (and poles). Diefenbaker would go on to win, big time, shocking the pollsters and the pundits alike. And 1957 would become one of the biggest upsets in Canadian political history, with the Tories ending nearly a quarter-century of Grit rule.

In the intervening years, plenty of politicos have repeated Dief’s quotable quote, or offered up a variation on it: “The only poll that matters is the one on Election Day.”

 

https://apple.news/AZMD53X1vRwmgQ-qsohLiGQ

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According to Elections Canada today 8/12/2019 the "Writ" calling the election has yet to be dropped. They expect that will happen sometime during the first 2 weeks of Sept.  I guess Justin is in no hurry and probably will continue to hand out Millions of our tax dollars in his attempt to garner more votes. 🙄

And the breaking news is:

Liberals commit $27M to offset Ford's legal aid cuts for refugees, immigrants

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has committed to a one-time legal aid top-up of $26.8 million for refugee and immigration cases to compensate for cuts delivered by Ontario Premier Doug Ford in this year's budget.

Ontario government had slashed funding, barred immigration and refugee cases

Kathleen Harris · CBC News · Posted: Aug 12, 2019 1:14 PM ET | Last Updated: 35 minutes ago
 
justin-trudeau.jpg
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced $26.8 million for legal aid for refugee and immigration cases, the bulk of which will go to Ontario. Premier Doug Ford cut funding for legal aid in the spring budget. (CBC)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has committed to a one-time legal aid top-up of $26.8 million for refugee and immigration cases to compensate for cuts delivered by Ontario Premier Doug Ford in this year's budget.

Trudeau made the announcement Monday at the Parkdale Intercultural Association in Toronto.

 

The move comes after Ford faced criticism for slashing funding for legal aid by 30 per cent. His spring budget cut Legal Aid Ontario funding by $133 million, and said the organization could no longer use provincial funds for refugee and immigration cases.

Ontario argued the refugee system is the federal government's responsibility, so should shoulder the associated legal costs. The federal government maintained legal aid is a provincial duty.

In July, the Immigration and Refugee Board, the tribunal that adjudicates asylum claims in Canada, warned the Legal Aid Ontario cuts would lead to longer hearings, more delays and adjournments, and more missed deadlines due to applicants who don't have a lawyer.

The Canadian Refugee Lawyers Association had urged the Liberal government to step in and fill the gap created by the Ontario legal aid cuts.

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“Justin Trudeau was like the deadbeat dad that wanted praise for finally paying his child support bills.

Trudeau showed up just weeks before an election and promises Ontario an additional $25 million in legal aid funding that they should have been getting for the past couple of years. It was nothing short of an election stunt.”

 

http://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/lilley-trudeau-finally-pays-up-part-of-his-refugee-bill

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August 14, 2019 4:17 pm   More of our money if elected.

Updated: August 14, 2019 4:24 pm

Federal government to fund Indigenous groups’ energy projects in B.C. and Alberta

By Staff The Canadian Press 
 
 
 
 
 
<img class="story-img" src="https://shawglobalnews.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/amarjeetsohinewfileresized.jpg?quality=70&strip=all&w=282" alt="Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi speaks during a news conference in Ottawa on October 3, 2018. " />; Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi speaks during a news conference in Ottawa on October 3, 2018.

Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi speaks during a news conference in Ottawa on October 3, 2018.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

The federal government is providing up to $6 million in funding to help Indigenous communities in British Columbia and Alberta increase their participation in energy infrastructure projects.

Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi made the announcement Wednesday.

Funds will be provided through the Indigenous Natural Resource Partnerships program.

A statement from Natural Resources Canada describes the program as a one-year initiative aimed at supporting Indigenous business development as well as Aboriginal communities and organizations interested in energy projects.

Successful projects could include creation of business plans or feasibility studies, training programs, engagement forums or other activities designed to boost participation in energy infrastructure development.

READ MORE: Ottawa won’t rush into sale of Trans Mountain pipeline to Indigenous groups: Sohi

Watch below: (From July 4, 2019) Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the government still has no intention to remain operators of the Trans Mountain pipeline and they remain interested in Indigenous partnership or ownership but will do so “in a measured way.”

Natural Resources Canada says funding preference will go to B.C. or Alberta groups proposing projects that will be substantially completed by next March.

Sohi says the partnerships program recognizes that Indigenous peoples are leaders in a cleaner, more resilient energy future.

“We are proud to partner with communities to increase participation and enable the development of innovative energy projects that will have benefits for generations to come.”

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I guess that answers my question of where are the indigenous coming up with $6billon dollars.

Tax payers money at work!

 

 

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12:10 ETGovernment of Canada investing in safety at the Kamloops Airport 

KAMLOOPS, BC, Aug. 15, 2019 /CNW/ - Canadians, tourists and businesses benefit from safe and well-maintained airports. From visiting friends and...

12:00 ETGovernment of Canada investing in safety at the North Peace Regional Airport 

FORT ST-JOHN, BC, Aug. 15, 2019 /CNW/ - Canadians, tourists and businesses benefit from safe and well-maintained airports. From visiting friends and...

11:00 ETGovernment of Canada investing in safety at the La Ronge (Barber Field) Airport 

LA RONGE, SK, Aug. 15, 2019 /CNW/ - Canadians, tourists and businesses benefit from safe and well-maintained airports. From visiting friends and...

AUG 08, 2019, 11:00 ETGovernment of Canada investing in safety at the Cambridge Bay Airport 

CAMBRIDGE BAY, NU, Aug. 8, 2019 /CNW/ - Canadians, tourists and businesses benefit from safe and well-maintained airports. From visiting friends and...

AUG 07, 2019, 08:24 ETGovernment of Canada invests in transportation infrastructure improvements at the Greater Moncton Roméo LeBlanc International Airport 

DIEPPE, NB, Aug. 7, 2019 /CNW/ - The quality of Canada's transportation infrastructure and the efficiency of the country's trade corridors are key to .

AUG 06, 2019, 11:00 ETCanada investing in safety at the Grande Prairie Airport 

GRANDE PRAIRIE, AB, Aug. 6, 2019 /CNW/ - Canadians, tourists and businesses benefit from safe and well-maintained airports. From visiting friends and ...

 

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2 hours ago, Marshall said:

LA RONGE, SK, Aug. 15, 2019 /CNW/ - Canadians, tourists and

How many tourists a year to La Ronge?

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Justin Trudeau's government goes ka-boom

A scathing report on Trudeau's handling of a corruption inquiry shredded his credibility and chances for re-election.

Andrew Mitrovicaby Andrew Mitrovica
3 hours ago
  •  
  •  
 
Canada's ethics commissioner said PM Trudeau improperly pressured a former attorney general to halt the criminal prosecution of a company  August 14, 2019 [Andrej Ivanov/Reuters]
Canada's ethics commissioner said PM Trudeau improperly pressured a former attorney general to halt the criminal prosecution of a company August 14, 2019 [Andrej Ivanov/Reuters]

I owe Canada's Ethics Commissioner Mario Dion an apology.

Earlier this year, I wrote a column referring to his office as "moribund," and anticipating that Dion would likely investigate the ethics scandal then devouring Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his equally powerful inner orbit of insolent advisers with the "tenacity of a chihuahua". 

That scandal - dubbed, the SNC-Lavalin affair - had the necessary ingredients of a cause celebre that could go ka-boom: a big, Quebec-based and historically well-connected engineering and construction company; tawdry allegations of bribery to win lucrative overseas contracts, pending criminal charges; and a lone federal minister, rebuffing, again and again, the PM and his emissaries who desperately wanted the whole, potentially combustible "problem" to be buried behind an expedient legal tactic.

So, when two opposition Members of Parliament asked the Liberal government's hand-picked ethics commissioner to probe the prickly matter, I assumed Dion would repay his patron's, no doubt, certain faith in him by doing his best to ensure that the SNC-Lavalin imbroglio didn't go ka-boom on the eve of a federal election that polls show is a toss-up.I was wrong. So, Mr Dion, I apologise.

Turns out, the ethics commissioner is not a chihuahua, but a piranha. On Wednesday, Dion shredded Trudeau's credibility, integrity and quite possibly his chances of being re-elected in October. Ka-boom, indeed.

In his scathing verdict, Dion found that Trudeau - working hand-in-glove with SNC Lavalin - had not only broken conflict of interest rules, but, in effect, the prime minister had treated the rule of law as a trivial, irritating obstacle while he and his unelected accomplices at the apex of authority in Ottawa repeatedly (and unsuccessfully) pressured former Attorney General and Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould to make damn sure SNC-Lavalin did not face an embarrassing and possibly crippling criminal trial.

"The evidence showed there were many ways in which Mr Trudeau, either directly or through the actions of those under his direction, sought to influence the attorney general," Dion wrote in his report. "The prime minister, directly and through his senior officials, used various means to exert influence over Ms Wilson-Raybould. The authority of the prime minister and his office was used to circumvent, undermine and ultimately attempt to discredit … the authority of Ms Wilson‑Raybould as the Crown's chief law officer."

Dion also took particular aim at Trudeau's "troubling" role in "directing his staff to find a solution that would safeguard SNC-Lavalin's business interests in Canada".

"I have no doubt," Dion concluded, "that the result of Mr Trudeau's influence would have furthered SNC-Lavalin's interests. The actions that sought to further these interests were improper since the actions were contrary to the constitutional principles of prosecutorial independence and the rule of law."

I had to re-read those astonishing excerpts several times to appreciate the profound implications of their meaning. 

First, Trudeau, his office and large swaths of the Government of Canada had acted essentially as a subsidiary of SNC-Lavalin.

As a result, Trudeau and company played a central role in an orchestrated campaign to: 1. Protect SNC-Lavalin's commercial interests at all costs to "save jobs". 2. Badger Canada's "chief law officer" relentlessly, and, in so doing, defile the supposedly sacrosanct notions of judicial independence and constitutionally protected due process. 

And when their brazen gambit failed, Trudeau and his eager associates tried to "discredit" - a polite euphemism for smear, I suspect - Wilson-Raybould after she said no to their parochial, politically motivated entreaties.

Anyone in Canada with keen, non-partisan synapses understood all this to be apparent long before Dion delivered his damning indictment. 

But to his honourable credit, Dion methodically gathered the evidence - as best he could - and told Canadians, using plain, direct language that the prime minister who hired him had broken the law and the justice minister who refused to appease the boss on principle had done her "due diligence" in defence of the rule of law. 

In my maiden column for Al Jazeera more than three years ago, I wrote that despite starry-eyed corporate media coverage, international audiences should not be fooled by Trudeau's youthful exuberance, telegenic charm and so-called progressive credentials.

Behind the deliberately manufactured facade, was an obdurate political operator who remained fixed to the old, corrosive ways and means of governing - domestically and internationally.

With his formidable imprimatur, Dion's exhaustive exhumation of Trudeau's dark modus operandi has provided, I believe, much ammunition to prove that column's central point.

Even Trudeau's predictable, bromide-laced response to Dion's evisceration of him is further evidence of how he goes about recycling the same, tired responses of so many other politicians who have had their private natures and shenanigans exposed. 

"I take full responsibility. The buck stops with the prime minister," Trudeau said. "I, obviously, take the ethics commissioner's report very seriously. We will make sure that this never happens again under any government in this country." 

My goodness, how many times have you heard that comical, banal pledge made by a rogue's gallery of presidents and prime ministers?

Here's another instructive query.

How many times have you heard sanctimonious politicians - like Trudeau - lecture the "developing world" about how "liberal" democracies like Canada are the model of probity and "good" governance that it ought to emulate?

That is, of course, a rhetorical question.

In any event, there have been the perfunctory calls for Trudeau to resign. That is not going to happen. Trudeau will not apologise, let alone step down. 

More astute observers recognise that Dion's report should be considered another chapter in the unfolding story, not the end of it.

Canada's top civil servant - the Clerk of the Privy Council - Ian Shugart, denied Dion access to all cabinet documents connected to Trudeau's conduct throughout the SNC-Lavalin affair. That means the entire, sordid story has not been told.

I hope the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) stirs from its institutional somnolence to read Dion's expose and demands in court, if need be, to see that paper trail Shugart prevented Dion from examining. That may lead Canada's federal police - if it is inclined - to make further inquiries that could lead to some uncomfortable places for Trudeau et al. 

Still, while I mistakenly suggested that the Ethics Commissioner's office was "moribund," I can confidently predict the Mounties will not press to see those secret cabinet records or ask any questions that might make Trudeau et al uneasy.

I would, however, welcome the opportunity to apologise again

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More of our money going to buy votes.  Note that the announcement was made in Quebec .  

Bibeau unveils $1.75B in compensation for dairy farmers harmed by trade deals

Spring budget earmarked $3.9B for sectors affected by CETA, CPTPP

Kathleen Harris · CBC News · Posted: Aug 16, 2019 10:37 AM ET | Last Updated: 34 minutes ago
 
cda-intl-aid-20161116.jpg
Agriculture Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau announced $1.75 billion in compensation for dairy farmers harmed by trade agreements. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

The Liberal government is delivering $1.75 billion in compensation for dairy producers negatively impacted by the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) and the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP).

The funding will roll out over eight years for nearly 11,000 farmers to compensate them for losses.

About $345 million of that total will be paid out in the first year in direct payments according to their production quotas.

A news release said a farm owner with 80 dairy cows will be awarded compensation of $28,000 in the first year.

Agriculture Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau is making the morning announcement at a farm in Compton, Que., today, and CBCNews.ca is carrying it live.

"This will allow everyone to make the best decisions based on new market realities and their respective situations," Bibeau said.

The minister said the funding reflects the government's deep respect for dairy farmers and its "unshakable belief" in Canada's supply management system.

The supply management system controls the supply of dairy, poultry and eggs through production and import controls and pricing mechanisms designed to stabilize profits for producers and pricing for consumers.

Scheer criticizes timing

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer accused the government of dragging its heels on delivering the funding.

"The announcement that was made today [Friday] is the exact same formula, the exact same scale that the Conservatives have previously put forward," he said. "It's frustrating ... on behalf of the dairy sector, I know a lot of producers are concerned that it took this long.

"Essentially it took four years for the Liberals to come forward with the exact same plan that Stephen Harper came forward with just before the last election." 

 

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This one will cost us double. 

Quote

The project was originally announced by the Liberal government with an estimated cost between $500 million and $1.5 billion. The plan was to award the contract in 2023 after a competition.

But with the federal election looming, the deal was fast-tracked by the Liberals, joining a series of recent defence-related funding announcements. A competition was jettisoned and replaced with a sole-source deal with General Dynamics, based in London, Ont.

THE LIBERALS ARE BUYING NEW ARMOURED VEHICLES FOR THE CANADIAN FORCES FOR $3 BILLION — TWICE THE ORIGINAL ESTIMATED COST. THE SOLE-SOURCE DEAL WITH GENERAL DYNAMICS IS BEING FAST-TRACKED.

 

  • Calgary Herald
  • 17 Aug 2019
  • DAVID PUGLIESE Postmedia News dpugliese@postmedia.com Twitter: davidpugliese
img?regionKey=DV7e8TQiMxsdPW15AjdGvw%3d%3dHarjit Sajjan

The Liberal government is buying new armoured vehicles for the Canadian Forces, but the sole source deal will cost taxpayers double what was originally planned.

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan announced Friday that the government would buy 360 combat support Light Armoured Vehicles from General Dynamics Land Systems-canada, with the project costing $3 billion.

The project was originally announced by the Liberal government with an estimated cost between $500 million and $1.5 billion. The plan was to award the contract in 2023 after a competition.

But with the federal election looming, the deal was fast-tracked by the Liberals, joining a series of recent defence-related funding announcements. A competition was jettisoned and replaced with a sole-source deal with General Dynamics, based in London, Ont.

The deal includes a $650 million repayable loan, but the Department of National Defence said it had no details on that arrangement. It referred questions to Global Affairs Canada, but that department did not comment.

The DND noted that the project costs include not only the vehicles but logistics support and new infrastructure to house and maintain the equipment.

General Dynamics will provide the new vehicles in eight variants. They will be used as ambulances and in other roles such as vehicle recovery, engineering, mobile repair, electronic warfare and as command posts. The current fleet of armoured support vehicles is comprised of the LAV II Bison and the M113 tracked vehicle.

The federal government said it is in the final stages of contract negotiations with General Dynamics. The contract is expected in the coming weeks.

It noted in a news release that fast-tracking the deal would allow the Department of National Defence to save costs associated with maintaining or extending the life of the current fleet.

The DND noted the contract was sole-sourced to General Dynamics because the firm builds most other armoured vehicles for the Canadian Forces and having a vehicle based on the same chassis allows for savings in maintenance and training.

The company’s light armoured vehicle is the core of the Canadian Forces armoured vehicle fleet.

In addition, as the company has recently completed the conversion of the light armoured vehicle fleet to a new configuration, it has the skilled workforce in place, according to the DND. That would reduce the risk of delays in delivery of the new vehicles, stated the DND in an email. “For these reasons, we believe it would not be in the public interest to solicit bids,” it added.

General Dynamics Land Systems-canada is also building similar light armoured vehicles for Saudi Arabia in a deal worth $15 billion.

The Liberal government launched a review of that controversial contract after the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside the Saudi consulate in Turkey. Earlier this year, a United Nations report determined that Saudi Arabia was responsible for the killing of Khashoggi who was a critic of that country’s regime.

Saudi Arabia has also faced severe criticism for its role in the ongoing war in Yemen, with allegations it has conducted unlawful airstrikes on civilians.

A dozen organizations sent Prime Minister Justin Trudeau a letter earlier in August, questioning the status of the review of the light armoured vehicle deal and pointing out that no updates on its progress have been provided. The lack of such information has brought “the sincerity of the effort into question," according to the letter endorsed by organizations such as Oxfam Canada and Amnesty International.

Various groups have demanded the Liberals cancel the Saudi deal, which was negotiated by the previous Conservative government.

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I will no longer post info re the $$$$$$ Millions that   the Liberals are daily promising with due dates of 2020, 2021 and beyond. Of course delivery of the $$$$$$$ would only be ensured if they win the next election.  I just can not keep up with the daily (sometimes 2 or 3) announcements.  They are using our money in an attempt to sway voters.  Not unexpected but...… I think they are going for a new record. 😀 Sadly their push may result in more votes from the people who are hopeful of receiving the funds.

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1 hour ago, Marshall said:

Sadly their push may result in more votes from the people who are hopeful of receiving the funds.

That’s his “ modus operandi “....Screw Canadians at every opportunity. 🤬🤬

Edited by Jaydee

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Unifor to run anti-Conservative ad campaign despite concerns of member journalists

The union represents 12,000 journalists and media workers. Some of them worry the union's political stance jeopardizes their objectivity

jerry-dias-1.png?w=604  
Desperate teen tweets from wifi-enabled fridge when herUnifor will run an aggressive anti-Conservative campaign even though its partisanship concerns some members who are journalists and media workers, says Jerry Dias, the union president.

In an email to Unifor members, Dias wrote the the union will run television ads during the election writ period asking Canadians to “think twice about supporting the Scheer agenda.” The union represents 12,000 journalists and media workers in Canada.

“We do not tell members how to vote, but I will be speaking out against the Conservative Party,” Dias wrote in the email. “Journalists, my own communications staff, even our Atlantic Regional Director, Lana Payne, a former journalists (sic), have all explained to me why our union’s partisan stance makes some of you uncomfortable. I hear you,” he wrote.

Payne did not respond to immediate request for comment.

Dias said he was protecting jobs, noting that Conservative Party of Canada Leader Andrew Scheer opposed federal funding to the news industry. The Liberals committed $600 million in the latest budget to help the news industry over the next five years.

Adding to concerns about bias, Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez named Unifor as one of eight panel members in May to advise the government on how to deliver its commitments to the news industry. The other panel members included the Media Council of Canada, News Media Canada and the Canadian Association of Journalists.

Unifor members include columnists, editors and news anchors at the Globe and Mail, Toronto Star and Global TV and CTV stations. It also represents employees at the Winnipeg Free Press, London Free Press and the Hamilton Spectator (it does not represent employees at National Post).

Paul Adams, an associate professor of journalism and communication at Carleton University, said Unifor’s seat on the panel could influence which news outlets receive federal funding ⁠— or give the perception of influence.

The media have a credibility issue, just as most institutions do

 

“The media have a credibility issue, just as most institutions do, whether it’s governments, unions, the Catholic church, universities,” said Adams. He said almost every significant institution has seen a decline in credibility over the past 50 years and journalists are often accused of bias.

“You can already see it on social media that people get cat-called by folks because they’re seen as trying to curry favour with their journalism in order to get government help,” Adams said.

In his email, Dias noted that 250 news outlets have closed in the past decade. He said Unifor will continue to lobby for tax and regulatory changes to prevent Amazon, Facebook and Google from siphoning away ad revenue from the union members’ employers.

“We all know that what your union says publicly does not impact your objectivity or your journalistic integrity as media workers,” Dias wrote. “Paying dues to a union does not mean you have to agree with everything your union does.”

 

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Quote

 “

“To have a strong middle class, you have to have strong unions.”


“In other words, we created a new standard,” Trudeau said. “That, my friends, is the power of solidarity. That is the power of putting people first.”

Trudeau said the labour movement has a long history of standing up for fair wages, reasonable working hours, and safe workplaces and for women, LGBTQ workers, disabled workers and for Indigenous communities.

“You can continue to count on our government,” Trudeau said. “We know the only way we will make real progress is by investing in people – not by cutting services.”

The labour movement is vital to that effort, Trudeau said.

https://www.unifor.org/en/whats-new/news/unions-vital-a-strong-society-trudeau-tells-convention

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