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Malcolm

Lion Air Down

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One of the best phone calls I've ever taken was from a colleague who'd recently landed in the aircraft I was due to take over. He'd had some "fun" on the previous leg and wanted to tell me first hand exactly what had happened. Some of it was stuff you couldn't write in even the most detailed of log entries. It was very helpful as I dealt with Maintenance Control because I knew what I was willing to accept - and what I wasn't. I still owe that guy a beer.

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I always try to get the MTC guy to meet me at the airplane so I can give the background and clarify what happened, what we saw and did, etc.  I've had some very good interactions, and learned a lot myself by talking directly to the guy who's going to address the snag.  I consider waiting at the aircraft after the flight to discuss snags with the AME to be one of my main responsibilities  - and I don't shirk my responsibilities.

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1 hour ago, seeker said:

I always try to get the MTC guy to meet me at the airplane so I can give the background and clarify what happened, what we saw and did, etc.  I've had some very good interactions, and learned a lot myself by talking directly to the guy who's going to address the snag.  I consider waiting at the aircraft after the flight to discuss snags with the AME to be one of my main responsibilities  - and I don't shirk my responsibilities.

Finally.... AME. I wondered when you were going get closer to his/her correct title. They don’t give away those licenses either. :)

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6 hours ago, Kip Powick said:

Oh my  !!

Well....I don't.  I knew when I wrote that I'd probably get a response from someone.  What I was trying to get across is that I see handling snags, making sure cosmetic and grooming issues are called in to the right dept and passing info to the outgoing crew as an important part of my job - irritates me to no end the guys who are already out on the 401 before the last passenger is off the airplane.

Edited by seeker
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4 hours ago, seeker said:

Well....I don't.  I knew when I wrote that I'd probably get a response from someone.  What I was trying to get across is that I see handling snags, making sure cosmetic and grooming issues are called in to the right dept and passing info to the outgoing crew as an important part of my job - irritates me to no end the guys who are already out on the 401 before the last passenger is off the airplane.

I believe that’s all a part of good airmanship as well as being a good employee. The added bonus is what you can learn about systems or your airplane in general when you do get speak directly to a qualified engineer. There’s also the mutual respect gained for each other’s job in the airline because the next time you’ve got a serious problem it’ll be someone who now knows you working with you to solve it. 

Edited by blues deville

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3 hours ago, seeker said:

Well....I don't.  I knew when I wrote that I'd probably get a response from someone.  What I was trying to get across is that I see handling snags, making sure cosmetic and grooming issues are called in to the right dept and passing info to the outgoing crew as an important part of my job - irritates me to no end the guys who are already out on the 401 before the last passenger is off the airplane.

Of course..... I certainly agree with you within the context concerning your intent  to post a personal opinion with respect to your aviation industry work ethic.

My comment was in jest...... in that  your remark  could be construed  as rather pompous if that opinion has to do with the functionality  of your entire life.4322.gif

No harm...no foul...have a great one4494.gif

 

 

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Wall Street Journal

By
Andy Pasztor and
Andrew Tangel

Updated Nov. 13, 2018 1:56 p.m. ET

. . . .

"Boeing marketed the MAX 8 partly by telling customers it wouldn’t need pilots to undergo additional simulator training beyond that already required for older versions, according to industry and government officials. One high-ranking Boeing official said the company had decided against disclosing more details to cockpit crews due to concerns about inundating average pilots with too much information—and significantly more technical data—than they needed or could digest. "

. . . .

https://www.wsj.com/articles/boeing-withheld-information-on-737-model-according-to-safety-experts-and-others-1542082575

 

 

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I have seen some horrible write ups in my time.  I once had a crew (probably more than once actually)  Tell me their autopilot was not working but when pressed for specifics were unable to elaborate.  Once I took the MEL out and was questioned as to what I was going to do, I said Defer it to an overnight when troubleshooting can be done since I do not have sufficient information.  Suddenly there was a plethora of information which led to a simple fix.  The devil is in the details.

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