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Malcolm

The ‘Trudeau Effect / Defect’ killing Canada !

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Year-end facts Canadians need to know

 

Speaking of tax increases, while the federal government claimed it “cut taxes for middle-class Canadians everywhere,” in reality, 81 per cent of middle-class families in Canada now pay higher income taxes under the Trudeau government’s personal income tax changes—on average, $840 more a year.

 

 

To hear many Canadian politicians tell it, everything in Canada is rosy. Take for example recent comments by federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau as he delivered his government’s Fall Economic Statement: “Canada's economy is strong and growing… our plan to grow the economy is working.” While the Finance Minister is certainly entitled to his own opinion, what about the facts? As 2019 begins, here are 10 year-end facts Canadians should understand and consider.

Investment, which is critical for future prosperity and job-creation, has collapsed and Canadians are increasingly investing in other countries. Specifically, foreign investment in Canada is down 55 per cent over the past five years while Canadian investment abroad has increased by 74 per cent.

The Canadian economy has managed to expand by merely 2.1 per cent in the past year, nearly a full percentage point below the United States (3.0 per cent). The government’s own Parliamentary Budget Officer projects the economy to grow at just 1.8 per cent next year and 1.5 per cent from 2020 to 2023, highlighting “headwinds” produced by the federal carbon tax.

The federal government continues to run significant deficits ($18 billion this year, growing to $20 billion next year) and apparently has no interest in balancing the budget. Indeed, the federal government’s own Department of Finance now projects the government will not balance the budget until 2045.

These perennial deficits are being run during a time of positive, albeit tepid, economic growth. If and when Canada’s economy slows down—or worse, hits a recession—the federal deficit could grow to $120 billion annually, depending on the severity of the recession and the government’s response.

Annual deficits and growing government debt has, and will continue, to create uncertainty for Canadian households and businesses about additional future tax increases.

Speaking of tax increases, while the federal government claimed it “cut taxes for middle-class Canadians everywhere,” in reality, 81 per cent of middle-class families in Canada now pay higher income taxes under the Trudeau government’s personal income tax changes—on average, $840 more a year.

All told, the total tax bill for the average Canadian family will exceed $38,000 in 2018, or 43.2 per cent of their income—more than what the average family spends on housing, food and clothing combined.

And that does not include the impact of the federal carbon tax. Canadians ought to be very critical of the federal government’s carbon tax because it’s not revenue neutral and will be added on top of, rather than replacing, existing regulations. And it may fail to reduce overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in part because some firms will relocate their activities to avoid the carbon tax.

While the carbon tax is especially damaging to Canada’s energy-intensive industries, the Trudeau government has doubled down and made approvals of major energy projects more complex and uncertain. That is, the government is radically revising the process of assessing major infrastructure projects (including pipelines) by including a large number of subjective criteria (i.e. “gender” analysis and a reliance on Indigenous knowledge) during project assessment.

And if that were not enough, the federal and many provincial governments have also discouraged thousands of new businesses from starting due to higher income taxes. When governments raise the top personal income tax rate, they discourage entrepreneurs from taking risks and starting new businesses, which are vital for economic growth and prosperity and drive innovation. Ottawa increased the top federal tax rate to 33 per cent from 29 per cent, and Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia and other provinces also increased their top provincial rates. Seven of our 10 provinces now have a top combined federal-provincial rate above 50 per cent.

As 2019 begins, let’s hope we see a refocus on policies that will actually improve the economy and lives of Canadians.

 

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/article/year-end-facts-canadians-need-to-know

 

 

 

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I don’t see anything the Liberal government has done as being out of character or surprising in any way. In fact, they have been pretty predictable. To his credit, JT has stayed the course on things like immigration and particularly “irregular border crossings.” Less principled politicians would have caved months ago.   

Those who now profess shock, horror and dismay were either not paying attention to the campaign or, in typical liberal fashion, thought someone else would be paying for their convictions and values. Those who once screamed “RASIST” have, in my simple world, proven themselves hypocrites by any measure of the word. The immigration situation is telling here, those who screamed “make the rich pay” have discovered that they are now deemed to be wealthy… and they don’t like it. Some are even rethinking the sanctuary city thing... a true indication of hypocrisy IMO.

Edited by Wolfhunter
  • Haha 1

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you spelled illegal wrong 😋

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Here’s another signal to the world that Canada is closed for business and trouble for the sunny ways pm:

Opposition to a natural gas pipeline running through Northern British Columbia is surging, with dozens of rallies halting traffic in Vancouver and city centres, and one group of protesters forcing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to change venues for a meeting with Indigenous leaders.

Quote

The 670-kilometre pipeline would ship natural gas from northeast B.C. to a liquefied natural gas terminal in Kitimat, on the coast. It is a crucial link in the $40-billion LNG project the B.C. and federal governments announced amid much fanfare last fall. Elected representatives of all 20 Indigenous bands along the pipeline route have signed project agreements with the company. Five of those bands belong to the Wet’suwet’en Nation: Wet’suwet’en First Nation (formerly known as the Broman Lake Indian Band), Burns Lake, Nee Tahi Buhn, Skin Tyee and Witset.

Quote

Look at us, we are fierce and empowered,” said Audrey Siegl, a Musqueam First Nations member who helped lead the march. “We are uniting and rising to save Indigenous people across Canada.”

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/british-columbia/article-protests-to-lng-pipeline-erupt-as-demonstrators-confront-trudeau-over/

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Much like down the States, let’s invent  a crime, then find someone to prosecute.

Returning bottles to the Beer Store? Beware of possible breath test by police

Taking back bottles to the Beer Store? A Mississauga man discovered this past weekend that it can lead to a breath test for alcohol by police. 

“He said, ‘I saw you at the Beer Store and to me you were taking back, what looked like in my opinion, an excessive amount of bottles,’” said Art, a 70-year old Streetsville resident. He asked Global News not to use his surname.
 
 

During the discussion, Art said the officer demanded a roadside breath sample. He asked what would happen if he did not provide it. The officer told him he would face arrest, a criminal charge, and a licence suspension. 

Art agreed to provide the breath sample, passed the test, and was on his way. 

“I felt like I was violated in a way. They shouldn’t have that right to pull a person over unless there is a good sign the person is doing something wrong,” said Art, who was not using a cellphone, hadn’t been speeding or violating any traffic rules. 

READ MORE: Canada’s new impaired driving laws are now in effect — here’s what to know

He was not charged with anything during the stop, which occurred a few blocks from the beer store where the police officer had been watching him. 

Until Jan. 1, Canadian police required reasonable suspicion a driver had alcohol in their bloodstream before insisting on a breath sample. Changes to federal legislation now permit police to demand a sample without cause. 

“What I want all Canadian drivers to understand is the likelihood of getting caught, should you make the criminal choice to drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs, the likelihood is about to increase exponentially because the police have new authorities and new tools,” said Bill Blair, Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction, in an announcement on Dec. 4. Blair is also a former chief of police in Toronto. 

“Police do not need any evidential basis whatsoever to demand a sample,” said Joseph Neuberger, a Toronto-based criminal defence lawyer, who said the Peel Regional Police officer was well within his new rights to demand a sample after Art dropped off his empties at the beer store.

 

https://globalnews.ca/news/4828694/impaired-driving-laws-breath-tests-police/

 

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The changes to the law were well advertised and documented.  If you are in a car they can pull you over and give you a breathalyzer.  period. They can, however, only perform the breathalyzer and nothing else.  Anything beyond that requires some reasonable suspicion.

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More Red tape....

Feds crack down on drone rules — Canadians now have to pass exam, get pilot’s certificate

 

 ANYONE flying a drone in Canada will have to pass an online exam and get a pilot’s certificate under new rules to be announced today by federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau.

 

Anyone flying a drone in Canada will have to pass an online exam and get a pilot’s certificate under new rules to be announced today by federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau. The new regulations, which come into effect June 1, apply to all drone operators, whether they fly for fun, work or research.

READ MORE: Feds get four drone complaints a week from pilots, airports across Canada

Operators will be required to register their drones and mark them with the registration number. A minimum age limit of 14 for basic operations and 16 for advanced will be introduced.

Pilots will have to keep their aircraft below 122 metres – 400 feet – above ground level and stay away from air traffic.

 

https://globalnews.ca/news/4829684/ottawa-new-rules-drones-canada/

 

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13 minutes ago, boestar said:

The changes to the law were well advertised and documented.  If you are in a car they can pull you over and give you a breathalyzer.  period. They can, however, only perform the breathalyzer and nothing else.  Anything beyond that requires some reasonable suspicion.

As it sits now, to avoid police harassment, One has to scout out the area before unloading at the beer store. 

or

you go home 100% sober, sit down, turn on the TV and have a beer and for some reason they come knocking demanding a breathalyzer test..IN YOUR HOME

Whats your reaction ? 

“ This isn’t about the carnage on the roads, it’s about civil liberties,” 

“How far do we want to go that we up our rights to privacy to ensure some protection against a danger?”

 

 

Edited by Jaydee
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Justin is on his annual tour of Town Meetings and of course they will also include fund raising for the Liberals. What I want to know, how much of his trip for Town Meetings will be billed against the Fund Raising, in other words are we paying for him to do his fund raising ?

Justin Trudeau talks jobs, economy and pipeline expansion in Kamloops

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is back in B.C. on Wednesday, flying into Kamloops for a public town hall and fundraising lunch.

Trudeau says he’s confident about keeping the peace around the pipeline debate during visit

Clare Hennig · CBC News · Posted: Jan 09, 2019 7:59 AM PT | Last Updated: 8 minutes agoPrime Minister Justin Trudeau is back in British Columbia on Wednesday, flying into Kamloops for a public town hall and fundraising lunch.

 

Trudeau said he expects jobs and the economy to be at the forefront of the discussion, hosted at Thompson Rivers University.

 

"That's one of first things we focused on as a government in terms of growing the economy and creating good jobs," he said.

 

"We've had good numbers in B.C. particularly, some of the lowest unemployment rates in history in B.C. right now, and across the country. But there are also people who continue to struggle."

Pipeline protests

 

One of the most contested topics in Kamloops currently is the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, with some adamantly supporting the pipeline because of the jobs it could create and others opposing it for environmental reasons.  

 

Trudeau said he's confident about keeping the peace around the pipeline debate.

 

"Most people understand that we need to both create good jobs for the future and protect our environment at the same time," he told Shelley Joyce, the host of CBC's Daybreak Kamloops.

 

"Getting those two things done together is a bit of careful navigating … and that's exactly what we're focused on."

Trudeau said he's not happy with the police response to recent protests about an LNG pipeline project in northern B.C. RCMP moved in to remove protestors and have made a number of arrests.

"It's not an ideal situation," said Trudeau.

"A hundred years ago, if the government decided 'Well, the railway is going here,' nobody was consulted and the government could just do this. That's not how we do things anymore and that's now how we should do things."

Trudeau said he isn't planning to visit the northern pipeline protest on this trip to B.C.

 

"One of the things that is really important is to try to reduce the temperature a little bit and sometimes engaging in that way is actually raising the political attention and the stakes," he said.

 

'Exercise in democracy' 

 

Trudeau's visit to Kamloops is part of his annual tour of town halls around the country during January, which he describes as an important exercise in democracy.

 

He emphasized that it's a chance for British Columbians to express their concerns, give feedback and share their opinions.

 

"It's an opportunity for Canadians to come out and ask questions to the Prime Minister  — there's no vetting, no entrance fee. Anyone who wants to show up can show up," he said.

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26 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

As it sits now, to avoid police harassment, One has to scout out the area before unloading at the beer store. 

or

you go home 100% sober, sit down, turn on the TV and have a beer and for some reason they come knocking demanding a breathalyzer test..IN YOUR HOME

Whats your reaction ? 

“ This isn’t about the carnage on the roads, it’s about civil liberties,” 

“How far do we want to go that we up our rights to privacy to ensure some protection against a danger?”

 

 

you must be IN a vehicle in order to be subject to the law.

 

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3 hours ago, boestar said:

you must be IN a vehicle in order to be subject to the law.

 

From the article..( Neuberger identified as a Criminal Defense Lawyer )

 

”  However, Neuberger expressed deep concerns over the changes, which give police powers to ask for breath samples even when someone is no longer driving or near their vehicle.

It’s part of another section of the legislation, which states that any driver “commits an offence who has within two hours after ceasing to operate a motor vehicle” is still over the legal alcohol limit. 

Neuberger said under the rules, nothing stops police from going to a someone’s home, or to a bar, to demand a sample from someone under suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol.”

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not coming into my house without a warrant. period.

 

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so i drive to a bar.  go inside and have a drink.  cop comes in and demands breathalyzer.  which is now inadmissible because I was observed having a drink in the bar AFTER leaving my car.

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5 hours ago, boestar said:

so i drive to a bar.  go inside and have a drink.  cop comes in and demands breathalyzer.  which is now inadmissible because I was observed having a drink in the bar AFTER leaving my car.

Here is a bit more context. This is all part of the JT pot legalization plan. No foreign power will bring us down, they will just watch us do ourselves in....

https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/mandel-cop-pulls-over-senior-for-returning-too-many-empty-beer-bottles

I simply don't understand how anyone in the country could ever vote for these guys.

Edited by Wolfhunter

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The new authorities the law grants to police are downright Orwellian and a good indicator of the direction trudeau is taking the County, but this incident sounds like the work product of a somewhat over exuberant rookie.

 

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This law will meet its fate in the future when it is challenged in court.  How many of you drive home from work get changed, grab a beer and flip on the TV and put your feet up?

Answer the door with a beer in your hand and the cop can do nothing.  They can make life miserable and make you fight a charge but it will never stick.  It will waste taxpayer money and courts time when they could be clearing backlogs of more important cases.

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More on the new law.

January 9, 2019 6:42 pm

Updated: January 9, 2019 9:14 pm

Police in Canada can now demand breath samples in bars, at home

sean-oshea1.png?w=40&h=40&crop=1&quality By Sean O’Shea Consumer Reporter  Global News
 

It may sound unbelievable, but Canada’s revised laws on impaired driving could see police demand breath samples from people in bars, restaurants, or even at home. And if you say no, you could be arrested, face a criminal record, ordered to pay a fine, and subjected to a driving suspension.

You could be in violation of the impaired driving laws even two hours after you’ve been driving. Now, the onus is on drivers to prove they weren’t impaired when they were on the road.

“It’s ridiculous, it’s basically criminalizing you having a drink at your kitchen table,” Paul Doroshenko, a Vancouver criminal defence lawyer who specializes in impaired driving cases, told Global News.

READ MORE: Returning bottles to the Beer Store? Beware of possible breath test by police

“If you start to drink after you get home, the police show up at your door, they can arrest you, detain you, take you back to the (police station) and you can be convicted because your blood alcohol concentration was over 80 milligrams (per 100 millilitres of blood) in the two hours after you drove.”

Changes to Section 253 of the Criminal Code of Canada took effect in December giving police greater powers to seek breath samples from drivers who might be driving while impaired.

Under the new law, police officers no longer need to have a “reasonable suspicion” the driver had consumed alcohol. Now, an officer can demand a sample from drivers for any reason at any time.

While many Canadians have heard about that part of the new legislation, lawyers said the two-hour provision has gone unreported.

READ MORE: Civil rights advocates question Canada’s new impaired driving law — but feds say don’t worry

“The public has completely missed this one,” said Joseph Neuberger, a Toronto criminal defence lawyer.

He described a scenario in which someone has gone home and watches a hockey game, enjoys a few beers, and gets a knock on the door from police, who received a tip about someone in the house who was driving a vehicle suspiciously.

“The person answers the door and they say, ‘Sir, we’ve had a complaint about your driving, we need you to provide a sample,” said Neuberger, noting if the person failed to provide the sample it would likely lead to arrest.

READ MORE: Canada’s new impaired driving laws are now in effect — here’s what to know

“It’s a serious erosion of civil liberties,” said Toronto criminal defence lawyer Michael Engel, whose practice focuses almost exclusively on impaired driving cases.

Engel said someone could be unjustly prosecuted. If a disgruntled business associate or spouse called police with a complaint and an officer went to investigate at the persons’ home or place of business, police could demand a breath sample.

“Husbands or wives in the course of separations would drop the dime on their partner,” Engel said, describing the potential for the law’s abuse by those calling police out of spite, for example.

“It casts the net too wide. It’s going to potentially criminalize innocent behavior.”

In an instance where someone was drinking in a public place, Doroshenko said it would be hard for someone to prove they weren’t impaired when they were driving earlier.

“If [the police] come and find you at the restaurant they can take you out of the restaurant despite the fact you’ve been drinking at the restaurant, maybe you weren’t going to drive away,” he said, arguing the rules are excessive.

“It is profoundly stupid, so most people assume it can’t be. But that’s what the law is now, you will see it happen — I guarantee it.”

The federal government brought in the revised law in an effort to reduce fatalities on roads.

READ MORE: How many drinks is too many under new impaired driving rules?

“Impaired driving is the leading criminal cause of death and injury in Canada,” said Minister of Justice and Attorney General Jody Wilson-Raybould in December.

“I believe these reforms will result in fewer road deaths and fewer Canadian families devastated by the effects of an impaired driver. This is one of the most significant changes to the laws related to impaired driving in more than 40 years and is another way that we are modernizing the criminal justice system.”

While criminal lawyers predict the new law will be challenged, likely through appeal courts and even to the Supreme Court of Canada, they expect that process will take several years. In the meantime, they say drivers are vulnerable to unfair arrests and prosecution.

“We’re in a brave new world now,” said Engel.

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how many times are we gonna post the article?

 

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4 minutes ago, boestar said:

how many times are we gonna post the article?

 

Once for me.  Did I miss an earlier article on it from Global?

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5 hours ago, boestar said:

how many times are we gonna post the article?

 

There is only ONE way to defeat stupid laws.

PLEAD..... 

Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, Not Guilty, 

...and when the courts eventually totally clog to a halt with citizens defending their right to have their day in court and subsequent REAL crimes start going unpunished because the system couldn’t give them their legal “due process “ in the allotted time frame, cases will start getting thrown out of court.

Trudeau will then be forced to see the stupidity of his decisions and make changes.

Edited by Jaydee

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Along with the US, China, India, Saudi Arabia...Trudeau now pokes his nose into Venezuela’s business ....... 

 

 

Maduro gives Canada an ultimatum - now Canada is braced for the expulsion of its diplomats

 

Relations between Canada and Venezuela took a sudden plunge today as Ottawa appeared to reject an ultimatum issued by President Nicolas Maduro on the eve of his second inauguration.

The dispute began with a letter sent by the Lima Group of 13 nations (12 in Latin America and the Caribbean, plus Canada) declaring Maduro's election undemocratic and illegitimate, and appealing to him not to take office today.

Maduro rejected that appeal and went on television to issue an ultimatum to what he called "the Lima Cartel": retract that letter within 48 hours or his government will take "crude, urgent and energetic measures." He also claimed that Venezuela was experiencing a coup attempt backed by its foreign enemies.

He made it clear that the measures he was considering were diplomatic, leading some observers to wonder if he intends to finally break relations and expel diplomats.

And a senior official at Global Affairs Canada told CBC News the department is bracing for the possible expulsion of diplomats and breaking of ties on Friday. "We are very well prepared for any and all eventualities tomorrow," the official said, when asked about the logistics of getting Canadian staff out of Venezuela in the event of a break.

Just under 24 hours later, Canada's Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland shot back with some of the harshest language her government has ever used against another nation:

"Today, Nicolás Maduro's regime loses any remaining appearance of legitimacy," she said in a written statement. "Having seized power through fraudulent and anti-democratic elections held on May 20, 2018, the Maduro regime is now fully entrenched as a dictatorship. The suffering of Venezuelans will only worsen should he continue to illegitimately cling to power.

"Together with other like-minded countries in the Lima Group, Canada rejects the legitimacy of the new presidential term of Nicolás Maduro. We call on him to immediately cede power to the democratically-elected National Assembly until new elections are held, which must include the participation of all political actors and follow the release of all political prisoners in Venezuela."

Canada recognizes young opposition leader

Freeland went on to say that Canada now considers the only legitimate authority in Venezuela to be the National Assembly that was elected in 2015. That assembly currently operates without any real authority after Venezuela's Supreme Tribunal of Justice — packed with supporters of Maduro's United Venezuelan Socialist Party — stripped it of its powers.

Those powers have been transferred to a new "constituent assembly" that is appointed, rather than elected.

"Canada congratulates Juan Guaidó, who on January 5, 2019, assumed the Presidency of the National Assembly," wrote Freeland. "As the only remaining democratically-elected institution in the country, the National Assembly must continue to play a crucial role in keeping Venezuela's democracy alive. Canadians stand with the people of Venezuela and their desire to restore democracy and human rights in Venezuela."

Guaidó is a 35-year-old engineer who serves as a congressman for the opposition Popular Will Party. He was elected to head the National Assembly by the often-fractious group of opposition parties that have dominated it since 2015. 

Foreign Minister Freeland spoke with Guaidó by telephone Wednesday to communicate Canada's support for him.

As head of the assembly, he is now considered Venezuela's most senior legitimate official by most countries of the hemisphere. Bolivia, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Mexico, Nicaragua and Uruguay are recognizing Maduro's second term, though their expressions of support range from enthusiastic (Cuba and El Salvador) to hesitant and muted (Ecuador, Mexico and Uruguay).

In remarks made in the capital Caracas, Guaidó said that Maduro had "stolen the symbols of power and given himself a paper crown." Flanked by other deputies, Guiadó said Maduro's inauguration showed he was backed by "only four or five countries. The whole world has come together to reject him...

"Today, Venezuela has no legitimate leader. Today, Venezuela's armed forces have no commander-in-chief."

The congressional leader also called on the country's armed forces, "those who wear the uniform with pride and haven't allowed themselves to be corrupted," to stand by their oath to defend constitutional order in Venezuela.

"The chain of command is broken," he said. "How is Maduro going to be able to appoint ambassadors, and have their credentials recognized, when other governments don't even recognize him?"

"Unanimity" against Maduro

The senior official with Global Affairs Canada said that Maduro was issuing threats from a position of weakness rather than strength. "There's unanimity in the hemisphere and elsewhere. The European Union has also spoken out very strongly.

"Maduro wouldn't be speaking publicly this way if he wasn't feeling the pressure."

The official also praised the government of Jamaica for its decision this week to nationalize the 49 per cent stake that Venezuela's state oil company holds in the island's Petrojam. The government of Jamaica, which is not part of the Lima Group, accused the Maduro government of not living up to its commitments to help modernize Jamaica's oil industry.

The Canadian official praised the boldness of the move. "There are real financial risks for them" in the hostile takeover, he said, adding it was another sign of the growing isolation of the Maduro regime.

New sanctions

The Lima Group statement that infuriated Maduro also announced a number of new measures against his regime.

Canada, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Saint Lucia all agreed to declare senior Maduro regime officials persona non grata in their national territories, bar all arms transfers to Venezuela, forbid overflights by Venezuelan military aircraft and use their influence at international institutions — such as the International Monetary Fund and World Bank — to prevent Venezuela from getting loans.

Paraguay followed up on the statement bybreaking diplomatic relations with Venezuela completely.

The 13 nations also warned Venezuela about an incident just before Christmas in which Venezuelan Navy patrol vessels approached and chased away a Norwegian oil-exploration vessel conducting a seismic survey in what Guyana says are its territorial waters.

A dispute over the marine boundary between Guyana and Venezuela has heated up recently following indications of major undersea oil deposits. Venezuela's own oil-dependent economy is in free-fall due to a combination of low prices, under-investment, corruption and government incompetence that has led to a steep drop in production.

 

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/venezuela-canada-maduro-freeland-1.4973575

 

 

Edited by Jaydee

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"Having already downed a few power drinks, she turns around, faces him, looks him straight in the eye and says,


"Listen here, good looking. I will screw anybody, anytime, anywhere, their place, my place, in the car, front door, back door, on the ground, standing up, sitting down, naked or with clothes on... It doesn't matter to me. I just love it."


His eyes now wide with interest, he responds, "No kidding... I'm in Government too. Are you Federal or Provincial?"

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