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Malcolm

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6 hours ago, Jaydee said:

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They are experts at that, but it's not until their machinations fall into the realm of your own expertise that you realize the extent.

I remember back when the contracts were out for the new shipborne helicopter (EH101). During the election, Chretien said "I will write zero helicopters...Chretien". In the lead up to the 1/2 billion dollar mess that followed they repeated the mantra "Cold War Cadillac" over and over. CBC did the same.

By the time they killed the program, people who new nothing about the Cold War and wouldn't know a Cadillac if they were run over by one, were parroting "we don't need Cold War Cadillacs." It was the precursor to the single biggest procurement debacle in Canadian Military history.

 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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1 hour ago, Wolfhunter said:

It was the precursor to the single biggest procurement debacle in Canadian Military history.

 

Really?  Bigger than the dented submarines that can't submerge and bigger than the Friggin Frigates?  That's an honest question - I really don't know how they compare.

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44 minutes ago, seeker said:

Really?

When I was a 2Lt the new helicopters were "just around the corner." They arrived three years after I retired. There are other messes and mistakes to be sure, but from a strictly (pure) procurement perspective, you would be hard pressed to site a longer running, more poorly executed procurement than the New Shipborne Aircraft (NSA) project. 

Here's a link, although in truth I didn't read it. I'm guessing that I agree with the author only based on the title (I may regret not having read it eh?), have to run.... cheers

https://rideauinstitute.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Publications-2013.02-The-Worst-Procurement-in-the-History-of-Canada.pdf

Edited by Wolfhunter

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35 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

 

Here's a link, although in truth I didn't read it. I'm guessing that I agree with the author only based on the title (I may regret not having read it eh?), have to run.... cheers

 

I think you'd be happy with the report, although it was written in 2013 so, before the actual deal was completed.

The statement “the worst procurement deal in Canadian history.” was made by Peter MacKay when he was Minister of National Defence in 2012.

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Trudeau stands with Beijing over Hong Kong

The Trudeau government says it has “deep concern” after the Chinese government decided to impose a new national security law on Hong Kong.

That’ll show them. Nothing like a little “deep concern” to make the dictators in Beijing change their ways.

Despite international commitments to ensure Hong Kong’s autonomy and allow the city a certain degree of democratic governance, Chinese President Xi Jinping has been exerting greater control. In a vote, led by Xi, China’s make-believe legislature voted 2,878 to 1 in favour of the security legislation.

The new law will ban secession, the subversion of state power and foreign intervention into Hong Kong’s affairs. It will also allow China’s security agencies to operate in the city for the first time.

https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/lilley-trudeau-stands-with-beijing-over-hong-kong?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook#Echobox=1590702384

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Edited by Jaydee
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Trudeau government borrows over

$371.5 BILLION IN 27 DAYS

Ottawa has set a borrowing record with his unchecked spending during the lockdown, borrowing more than one third of a trillion dollars in 27 days, according to Blacklock's Reporter.

The Trudeau government has used this money to finance their pandemic relief packages such as CERB or the employee wage subsidy. This has often been referred to, incorrectly, as a stimulus package, in reality it was created to force the economy into a hibernation. 

Finance Minister Bill Morneau's assistant said that "in total between March 1 and March 26 we’ve issued $371.5 billion in debt."

 

“ All this talk we’re hearing from deficit advocates about how now’s a great time to borrow because rates are low, well that will be out the window in two years when all of this debt rolls over and has to be borrowed again, presumably at higher rates," added Poilievre shrewdly. 

Canada's debt has been estimated to reach a remarkable $1 trillion this year by government officials. “
 

https://thepostmillennial.com/trudeau-government-borrows-one-third-trillion-breaking-record

Edited by Jaydee

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RE the debt, more and more of the folks that I talk with are not concerned personally about the increased debt load as most of them / us will not live long enough to worry about how it will be paid back.  🙃 Increased taxes could be a problem but not a lot can come from tax on  OAS etc.)

They are however concerned re the mess / debt that will fall upon the shoulders of their children and grandchildren.  

The only danger is to those who live on and are relying on the sale of their home to finance other living quarters until they die, so there is some concern re the possibility of a real estate tax.  

 

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1 hour ago, Marshall said:

RE the debt, more and more of the folks that I talk with are not concerned personally about the increased debt load as most of them / us will not live long enough to worry about how it will be paid back.  🙃 Increased taxes could be a problem but not a lot can come from tax on  OAS etc.)

They are however concerned re the mess / debt that will fall upon the shoulders of their children and grandchildren.  

The only danger is to those who live on and are relying on the sale of their home to finance other living quarters until they die, so there is some concern re the possibility of a real estate tax.  

 

I’m in the same boat. It’s my grandchildren I worry about.
 

Their financial futures are toast because of Trudeau, and what’s even worse, he still has a possible 3 more years to further destroy what’s left of this country.

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1 hour ago, Jaydee said:

I’m in the same boat. It’s my grandchildren I worry about.
 

Their financial futures are toast because of Trudeau, and what’s even worse, he still has a possible 3 more years to further destroy what’s left of this country.

Propped up by the ND and the Green.  Maybe the BLOC and the Conservatives will do the deed but as long and the hinderland (Ontario) holds the hammer I suspect Justin will be returned to office.

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A couple of days ago Premier Dwight Ball of Newfoundland and Labrador and a host of others pleaded in a conference call for urgent assistance to the devastated offshore oil industry. The industry is moving closer to the autopsy table by the hour. Then from Seamus O’Regan, Newfoundland’s minister in the federal cabinet (wherever it is these days, and whatever it is doing), came an email which pointedly didn’t say it was considering the urgent request — how could it not? — but did say that the “province’s commitment to net zero emissions by 2050 is good for our environment and good for our economic competitiveness.”

In what dreamland did that line emerge? O’Regan gets an emergency request asking for immediate aid from the premier on May 26, 2020, and he emails in response a fantasy projection 30 years into the unknowable future, 2050. Which, as chance would have it, is presumably around the time Parliament might reopen.

Sooner or later, reality is going to bite our drama teacher and his minions hard...you can’t lock down the economy for months and expect it to come “roaring back”...the country will be mired in recession, and the government will have tapped out its line of credit......citizens will wonder, how could this happen, it wasn’t supposed to be like this..
unfortunately, we are the ones that will pay for his ego.

 

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-newfoundlands-sos-falls-on-deliberately-deaf-ears

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23 minutes ago, mo32a said:

Anyone get their $300 on their OAP? I didn't.

Trust Justin, the cheque may be in the mail, hope they don't use the Phoenix pay system to issue the cheques.  🙃

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3 hours ago, mo32a said:

Anyone get their $300 on their OAP? I didn't.

I have wondered where it went also because neither my wife nor I has seen anything.

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The Liberals and NDP have embraced contempt for Parliament

It is probably an academic question as to which is more disgraceful: the fact that the Liberals were so willing to sell out Canadian democracy, or that they got such a low price for it

One thing we’ve learned from the COVID-19 pandemic is the depths of the contempt that Canada’s professional class has for the practice of politics, our political parties and even Parliament itself. In the early days of the pandemic, this contempt largely emanated from journalists, but it appears to have now spread to members of the political class themselves. There is little reason to think our institutions of democracy will ever recover.

As in many countries, Canada’s initial response to the arrival of the novel coronavirus was highly technocratic. We essentially turned the running of the country over to the public-health experts, with political leaders at every level appearing more than happy to let the country’s various chief public-health officers take the lead. There were some very good reasons for this, not least of which is that a public-health crisis of this magnitude is unknown in almost all of our experience. This is pretty much why we have experts in the first place.

There was also an understandable feeling that a public-health crisis was no time for “mere politics” — the jousting and the gamesmanship and the pettiness of a lot of political life seemed hugely out of step with the emerging scale of the crisis. Combined with other aspects of the response, measures like the command economy, the taking on of huge levels of public debt and the widespread restrictions on civil liberties, it served to underscore the sense that we were in something close to wartime footing.

trudeau_virus-2.jpg?quality=60&strip=all&w=590 Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, front centre, discusses the government’s response to the coronavirus outbreak, while Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, back left, looks on, during a news conference in Ottawa on March 11. David Kawai/Bloomberg

But just as a war is far too serious a matter to leave to the generals, a pandemic is too important to leave to the experts. Every decision that has been made, every aspect of our response, has involved trade-offs, including the dreadful job of deciding who will live and who might die. These decisions are irreducibly political, and many of our leaders waited far too long to accept their ultimate responsibilities here. It is to our great discredit that we let them.

At the heart of this discredit sits the black hole that is our absentee Parliament. It was bad enough when, back in April, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer was dragged for suggesting that the House of Commons ought to resume sitting as scheduled and that the burden of argument lay with those who thought it should not. It was far worse that foremost amongst the draggers were some of the most senior and prominent members of the parliamentary press gallery, who accused Scheer of being “tone deaf” and out of touch.

But none of this holds a candle to the prospect of one opposition party, in a minority Parliament, conspiring with the government to shut down the Commons in exchange for the smallest fraction of partisan advantage.

house_of_commons-1.jpg?quality=60&strip=all&w=590 Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, centre, attends a meeting of a special committee on the COVID-19 pandemic as MPs practice social distancing in the nearly empty House of Commons on May 13, 2020, in Ottawa. Dave Chan/AFP via Getty Images

But that’s what happened this week, when Jagmeet Singh’s NDP gave its support to a Liberal motion to extend the suspension of regular sittings of the House of Commons until late September. This, despite the fact that March (and April, and May) came and went without a federal budget, that something like $150 billion in new spending must be approved by mid-June and that there are enormous non-COVID challenges facing the country that simply must be debated in Parliament — our increasingly ominous relationship with China at the top of the list.

What’s in it for the Liberals is pretty obvious: the continuation of “The Justin Trudeau Cottage Show, Summer Edition.” As for the NDP, they’ve got themselves the X-ray specs of cereal box prizes — a pledge by the Liberals to make some attempt at persuading the provinces to implement a national program of 10 days paid sick leave. At this stage, it is probably an academic question as to which is more disgraceful: the fact that the Liberals were so willing to sell out Canadian democracy, or that they got such a low price for it.

Anyone who has thought it right to criticize this tidy bit of Monty Hall karaoke on social media has been met with a bingo-card of transparently partisan excuse-making and special pleading. Actually the House is sitting right now. (Sort of. Barely. Inadequately.) Parliament always has a summer recess from June to September, dummy. And didn’t you know that former prime minister Stephen Harper prorogued Parliament twice?

skp103-the-canadian-press-2.jpg?quality=60&strip=all&w=590 NDP leader Jagmeet Singh arrives to hold a press conference on Parliament Hill amid the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa on Monday May 25, 2020. Sean Kilpatrick /  THE CANADIAN PRESS

What’s interesting though is that the dealmakers themselves haven’t bothered trying to run any of these lines past the voters. Both the Liberals and the NDP have happily conceded what they did, and just dared anyone to make an issue out of it. But who would? It’s not like Parliament matters. As one national columnist wrote last week, “The least essential service throughout the pandemic has been politics.”

In the end a democracy is nothing more, and nothing less, than a committed relationship between citizens and their political institutions. It is a shared set of expectations, hopes and dreams, with a plan for how they might be accomplished. And like all relationships, a democracy can weather some pretty nasty storms — cynicism, anger, even betrayal.

There is one thing no relationship cannot survive, though, and that is contempt. Contempt is a rot that eats away at its very foundations, and it is unhealthy enough when that contempt is held by the people and their self-proclaimed agents in the media. But when it emanates from the agents of democracy itself, when it is proudly boasted of by the highest office-holders in the land, then the country is indeed well and truly.

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/andrew-potter-the-liberals-and-ndp-have-embraced-contempt-for-parliament

 

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“ Global reports that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is calling on Canadians to reject racism as protests erupt in the U.S. over the death of George Floyd, a Black man killed during a police arrest.

Trudeau said anti-Black racism is a reality in Canada as well.

“We need as a society to stand together, stand up against discrimination, be there for each other in respect but also understand that we have work to do as well in Canada,” he said.

Trudeau called on Canadians to “stand together in solidarity” against anti-Black, anti-Asian racism, or any other type of racial hate.

His comments come after the death of Floyd, who was killed by a white police officer during an arrest in Minneapolis. Criminal charges have not been laid though the officer involved was fired.

Floyd’s death has sparked days of protests — which erupted into looting and fires — calling for justice in the man’s death.

The U.S. National Guard was called in on Thursday.

U.S. President Donald Trump lashed out at the demonstrators in a late-night tweet, calling them “thugs” and raising the spectre of violence against them.

“These THUGS are dishonouring the memory of George Floyd, and I won’t let that happen,” Trump said.

“Just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him that the Military is with him all the way. Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts. Thank you!”

Twitter hid the tweet under a warning message because it violated the platform’s rules on “glorifying violence.”

Trump is doing the right thing despite what Liberal Twitter says and Trudeau, is nothing more than a hypocrite.  Just saying.“

 

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Edited by Jaydee

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A quote from "another thread" that also seems right at home here:

Only a Liberal could make the assertion that a statement and its direct negation can both be true at the same time. The single most reliable test of Truth is internal consistency. When a statement disagrees with itself, it is by its very nature false.

Edited by Wolfhunter

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Who needs Parliament when Trudeau has a morning show to maintain?
 

It takes a remarkable level of arrogance to think that during a period of unprecedented economic and social upheaval, parliamentary oversight is a frivolous formality that this government – exceptional in its own view – can simply do without. It’s the attitude of an athlete who believes himself too good for a coach, or a writer who can’t be bothered with an editor. Except here, the stakes are roughly a quarter-trillion times higher.

With support from the NDP, which is apparently confused about its role in Parliament, the Liberals pushed through their suspension of full parliamentary sittings from June 18 until Sept. 21 in a House vote this past week. In doing so, the Liberals freed themselves from the accountability one would expect of a minority government navigating through a pandemic, and took over the reins to steer Canada through what is certain to be a summer unlike any this country has ever before seen.

The vote came hours after the release of an extraordinary report from the Canadian Armed Forces about grotesque and unacceptable conditions at five long-term care homes in Ontario. Long-term care does fall primarily under provincial jurisdiction, but there has been a role for the federal government during this pandemic in providing financial relief, in setting federal guidelines and dispatching CAF personnel to help in the hardest-hit homes. That will only be subject to regular parliamentary oversight until the middle of June.

This summer will be one of continued record unemployment, of the scheduled expiration of border-control measures with the United States and of potential retaliatory measures from China in response to the recent B.C. Supreme Court decision on the extradition of Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou. The Conservatives attempted to reconvene the special committee on Canada-China Relations this past week, initially in response to the evolving situation in Hong Kong, before the threat of renewed economic penalties from China entered into the immediate purview. That effort was quashed by the Liberals, along with the NDP and the Green Party.

With a mere four scheduled sitting days in July and August, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his team will thus deal with China – and record unemployment, and border controls, and pandemic relief, and food-supply problems, and all of the other issues certain to arise during this extraordinary time – essentially alone, without the formal input and oversight of members of Parliament elected to represent a majority of Canadians. The government has allocated just four hours on June 17 for “debate” of a historic $150-billion emergency-spending plan. They might as well have allocated no time at all.

 

Other countries have, by now, figured out how to balance health concerns and physical distancing requirements with the essential role of government. In Canada, the Alberta legislature has already reconvened and scheduled sessions throughout the months of June and July. The federal government could similarly do so if the Prime Minister and the Liberal Party had the impetus to address lingering procedural concerns, and if the NDP had the wisdom not to forfeit their power in exchange for a promise to explore paid sick leave, for which the Liberals will just take credit anyway if a plan comes to fruition.

Opposition parties of the past were outraged – and justifiably so – when Stephen Harper repeatedly prorogued Parliament during his time as prime minister, most notably for several weeks in 2008 to avoid a no-confidence vote. Yet the Liberals and NDP now consider it acceptable to suspend regular House sittings for months – after Parliament has been largely adjourned since mid-March – as if this were any old summer, with a regular federal budget (which of course we don’t have) and business across Canada functioning pretty much as usual.

No doubt from a partisan perspective, the Liberals are better off focusing on Mr. Trudeau’s daily Rideau Cottage morning show, where he is unencumbered by the nuisance of parliamentary tools and procedures such as opposition days, votes and motions. Mr. Trudeau’s approval rating has jumped considerably during this pandemic. A return to regular sittings obviously would not help to maintain that momentum.

But if the Liberals contend, even implicitly, that there is no place for parliamentary oversight during the worst public-health and economic crisis in a century, then it’s hard to make the case that there is a place for parliamentary oversight anytime in Canada at all.

Perhaps Mr. Trudeau is confident that, together with his cabinet, he can govern properly without the formal input of the opposition MPs Canadians elected to represent their views and interests. If so, that confidence should be bottled and sold as a lucrative scheme toward Canada’s economic-recovery plans. But the Prime Minister ought to know that of equal importance to the proper functioning of democracy is the perception of the proper functioning of democracy.
 

Mr. Trudeau, to be fair, almost certainly understands that. It‘s probably more likely that he just doesn’t care.

 

Globe & Mail.

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Things are getting desperate....Toronto Mayor Tory is getting worried...Trudeau is spending money he has already boasted about spending!

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Look out professionals, entrepreneurs, small business owners and retirees, tax hikes are coming

Martin Pelletier: Now is a great time to identify strategies on how best to respond when the taxman comes calling

taxes-1.jpg?quality=80&strip=all&w=780 High-net-worth Canadians, small businesses and corporations better get ready as this government is strategically very well positioned to start implementing massive tax hikes aimed directly at them, writes Martin Pelletier.Getty Images

 
 

Canadian investors have a lot of options when it comes to mapping out portfolio risks and finding ways to mitigate them, such as diversifying their portfolios into larger, faster-growing and more innovative markets, but there are some risks on the immediate horizon where this exercise will do little to help, especially for professionals, entrepreneurs, small-business owners and retirees.

As the economic lockdown comes to end, municipal, provincial and federal governments will have to account for the billions of dollars they’ve spent over the past few months and find a way to start paying for it. This means a reduction in normalized spending and/or the introduction of new taxes to cover higher debt-servicing costs.

The problem is that the average population benefits from spending increases, but the entire tax burden often falls on a minority

 

The problem is that the average population benefits from spending increases, but the entire tax burden often falls on a minority. For example, is it really surprising that three in four Canadians are in favour of introducing a wealth tax when these three in four Canadians won’t be paying for it?  Idealism is easy when someone else foots the bill.

Politicians are highly motivated by what voters want so we worry about what lies ahead, especially given the huge rise in Justin Trudeau’s popularity coming out of his office’s spending spree that could result in a deficit that exceeds a quarter-trillion dollars. More troubling, though, is his government’s numerous attempts to use this time of uncertainty to obtain more powers and less oversight.

At the end of March, the government tried unsuccessfully to give itself sweeping powers to spend, borrow and change taxes as it so chose, without parliamentary approval, through to December 2021, but this was too much for opposition parties.

Since then, the government has been operating under the oversight of an all-party COVID-19 special committee that meets twice a week via videoconference and one day a week in the House of Commons. Well, even this was too much for Trudeau’s party, and with surprising support from the NDP, it was able to shut down this committee as of June 18, while Parliament will remain suspended until Sept. 21.

As a result, high-net-worth Canadians, small businesses and corporations better get ready as this government is strategically very well positioned to start implementing massive tax hikes aimed directly at them.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t get much better at the local level, since municipalities are in dire shape and running large deficits with little options to borrow. Some cities such as Calgary have already started to introduce double-digit tax hikes on residents (I know, as I got one this year) and high double-digit tax increases on business owners.

Other cities, like Vancouver and Toronto, despite having very robust housing markets, are lobbying for support from both provincial and federal governments. That said, I’m sure Canadians living in cities such as Saskatoon, Edmonton and Winnipeg don’t want to be subsidizing cities like Vancouver where the average two-story house is worth more than $2.1 million.

The only good news in all of this is that interest rates remain quite low, so debt-servicing costs could be a lot worse than they are now. In the interim, we think governments will have a hard time turning off the taps and even low interest rates won’t be enough to get their finances in order without some form of tax hikes. The big questions are how much of a hike, who will it be focused on, and what can be done about it?

For those wanting to be proactive, now is a great time to map out your family’s positioning via a financial plan, and identify potential tax strategies on how best to respond when the taxman comes calling.

 

https://nationalpost.com/investing/look-out-professionals-entrepreneurs-small-business-owners-and-retirees-tax-hikes-are-coming/wcm/18cce58b-52ad-46eb-9e90-5bfe7ba554d3?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook#Echobox=1591024691

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