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8 hours ago, Marshall said:

I agree and the past is the past but like all history, if we forget, we are doomed to repeat our mistakes.   

 

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You really have to wonder what is going on with Trudeau and the Chinese:

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From 2016/17

A wealthy Vancouver businessman used a cash-for-access fundraiser at his home to lobby Prime Minister Justin Trudeau directly to allow Chinese investment in seniors' care, relax immigration restrictions on financiers and make it easier for foreign real estate developers to plow money into Canada.

The Nov. 7 fundraiser hosted by Miaofei Pan, where talk of investment by Chinese companies in seniors' care took place, came as the Trudeau government is reviewing a bid by China's Anbang Insurance Group to buy one of B.C.'s biggest retirement-home chains.
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/trudeau-discussed-chinese-investments-at-fundraiser-host-says/article33200126/

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It’s the fourth home owned by Retirement Concepts in which health authorities have intervened because of the neglect of seniors. Concerns have been raised about the care of vulnerable seniors since 2017, when the federal government approved the sale of Retirement Concepts to Beijing-based Anbang Insurance Group.
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/british-columbia/article-fourth-retirement-concepts-seniors-home-taken-over-by-province/

 

 

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In the letter to Ambrose, Dawson says she wrote to Trudeau and requested a list of fundraiser organizers, attendees, and donations made at events on May 19, 2016 in Toronto and Nov. 7 2016 in Vancouver. She also requested information on Trudeau and his staff’s discussions with Shenglin Xian, the founder of Wealth One Bank of Canada, who took photos with Trudeau at the Toronto event. A month after attending Trudeau’s event Wealth One got federal approval to open a national bank in Canada.
 

Dawson also asked Trudeau for any information on discussions with Thomas Liu, a Chinese businessman who donated for the May event. Liu was hoping to sell $1 billion of canola oil to China but his export ambitions could have been blocked by a Chinese government decision to restrict Canadian canola imports.

When Trudeau visited China in September he got the Chinese government to lift those restrictions. Dawson also requested information from Trudeau on Maiofei Pan, the Chinese businessman who said he urged Trudeau to allow Chinese investment in seniors’ care.

 

https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/justin-trudeau-cleared-in-cash-for-access-investigation-by-ethics-commissioner
 

 

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Canada’s military wants Justin Trudeau to ban Huawei Technologies Co. from the nation’s fifth-generation wireless networks, according to the Globe and Mail.

Senior military officials including Canada’s top soldier have told the government they believe allowing the Chinese company a role in 5G would threaten national security, the newspaper reported Monday, citing an unnamed official familiar with the matter.

Donald Trump has been pushing allies to shut the Shenzhen-based tech giant out, citing concerns its gear could be vulnerable to Chinese spies. American officials have warned the U.S. might be forced to hold back secret intelligence from Canada if the prime minister gives Huawei a role, despite the company’s repeated denials it poses a security risk.

Canada is the only member of the so-called Five Eyes network of intelligence-sharing nations that has yet to decide what to do with Huawei. Australia and New Zealand followed the U.S. lead in banning it, but U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government opted for a mixed approach in a Jan. 28 decision that disappointed the White House.

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/military-wants-huawei-banned-from-5g-in-canada-report-1.1387769

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One of the most infuriating blunders of Canada’s political class in the ongoing pandemic was obsessing about alleged massive societal racism against Canadians of Chinese origin, when the real crisis was the looming carnage of COVID-19.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appeared at a Chinese banquet hall in Scarborough on Feb. 1, warning about discrimination, while the Public Health Agency of Canada assured Canadians the risk of COVID-19 was low.

On Feb. 11, Ontario Health Minister Christine Elliott, federal Health Minister Patty Hajduk and Tory visited a dim sum restaurant, urging people to eat at Chinese restaurants.

Within weeks, all restaurants were shut down by government decree because of COVID-19.

On Jan. 29, Canada’s chief public health officer, Theresa Tam, testifying before the Commons health committee, lavished praise on China for containing the spread of COVID-19, while assuring Canadians cases here would be “rare”.

Then she focused on her big worry:

“I am concerned about the growing number of reports of racism and stigmatizing comments on social media directed to people of Chinese and Asian descent related to 2019-nCoV coronavirus … 

https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/goldstein-our-leaders-fretted-about-racism-more-than-covid-19


Has he really been so worried about pleasing the Chinese and his admiration for the dictatorial form of its government that he has sacrificed the financial stability of this country and the  well being of Canada’s citizens? He has already tried to have sole discretion for spending and taxation til 2021, flirted with the Emergency Measures act, censorship of the press, and suspension of parliament. He should be concerned about holding the country together instead of his daily sermons from father Trudeau, assuring everyone he has got our back and the government is there for you.

By the time the pandemic is over, Canada will be so far in debt, small businesses ruined, and very few  of Canadians will have a job to go back to.....the airline sector is a prime example. Will Trudeau invite his Chinese friends to come pick up the pieces of what will be left of Canada?

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24 minutes ago, st27 said:

One of the most infuriating blunders of Canada’s political class in the ongoing pandemic was obsessing about alleged massive societal racism against Canadians of Chinese origin, when the real crisis was the looming carnage of COVID-19.

And all of the video clips are in the public record.  

Liberals and Demonrats doing the deflection dance and blame polka will get to watch all of their before and afters. So a bit of humility now may save them some embarrassment later.

 I'm reminded of how quiet JT became (after calling all and sundry white supremacists) when the black face, turned brown face, turned makeup debacle hit the airways. For me (and I'm guessing others), it was never about the event itself, only the breathtaking hypocrisy.

Edited by Wolfhunter

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I've been thinking about this "racism against Canadians of Chinese origin" we've been hearing about and I think I have an explanation.

Since the Covid has become an issue I've noticed that people, all people, have become somewhat adverse to being in close proximity to others.  I notice as I walk towards other people, on the street, in the grocery store, at the airport everybody kind of veers to the side (yeah, I know there's a joke in there).  This has never happened to me before and it's not just me because when I watch other people I can see everybody doing it.  

I'm an older white dude so when I start noticing this, of course, I attribute it to people being freaked out about Covid.  Now, if you were a person of Asian ancestry and not aware you might assume it's because you're Asian and not because everybody is avoiding everybody.  So Chinese ancestry people are being avoided by others but everybody is avoiding everybody.

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20 hours ago, seeker said:

I've been thinking about this "racism against Canadians of Chinese origin" we've been hearing about and I think I have an explanation.

Since the Covid has become an issue I've noticed that people, all people, have become somewhat adverse to being in close proximity to others.  I notice as I walk towards other people, on the street, in the grocery store, at the airport everybody kind of veers to the side (yeah, I know there's a joke in there).  This has never happened to me before and it's not just me because when I watch other people I can see everybody doing it.  

I'm an older white dude so when I start noticing this, of course, I attribute it to people being freaked out about Covid.  Now, if you were a person of Asian ancestry and not aware you might assume it's because you're Asian and not because everybody is avoiding everybody.  So Chinese ancestry people are being avoided by others but everybody is avoiding everybody.

Re everybody is avoiding everybody, there are some noticable exceptions that I observed in the past few days and those are Large White Males (former jocks?) that are still behaving   like they are entitled to your space as well as their own.    image.png.0c6ae2168e3e12c9760bfe5f20c80b8d.png

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"Tonight was supposed to be the beginning of a tenancy of gigs at the @royalalberthall, but thanks to some f--king bat eating, wet market animal selling, virus making greedy bastards, the whole world is now on hold," the post read.

"My message to them other than 'thanks a f--king lot' is go vegan."

Cuts Like a Knife

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29 minutes ago, Airband said:

Love this reply from University of Alberta professor Tim Caulfield, who is the Canada Research Chair in Health Law and Policy;

He called Bryan Adams' statement connecting bats with the coronavirus "Scientifically wonky."  But then goes on to say:
".....A bat may have been involved, in fact, some interesting research recently ... definitely points in that direction."  So, which is it Professor Caulfield?  Is it scientifically wonky or does the research point at bats as the source?

 

Edited by seeker
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If you have ever been to China normal time social distancing never happened, they just keep packing in tighter and tighter.

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On 5/10/2020 at 6:13 PM, seeker said:

I'm an older white dude so when I start noticing this, of course, I attribute it to people being freaked out about Covid.  Now, if you were a person of Asian ancestry and not aware you might assume it's because you're Asian and not because everybody is avoiding everybody. 

I see cars on the roadways driving with more distance between them.  

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13 hours ago, mo32a said:

If you have ever been to China normal time social distancing never happened, they just keep packing in tighter and tighter.

My impressions of Hong Kong .....it was like watching ( in real time  ) what it must be like living inside an Ant Hill

Edited by Jaydee

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IMHO, there’s not a snowballs chance in hell Trudeau will actually take Canada financial situation seriously. Cutting spending would decimate his support base.
Big spending on COVID-19 now should mean smaller government later, Stephen Harper argues in essay

The former PM forecasts governments could eventually see "brutal" austerity measures if they don't rein in debt

In a rare newspaper column, former prime minister Stephen Harper argues that the massive public spending — and the subsequent massive public debt — in response to COVID-19 right now must lead to smaller government action so the economy can recover and debt levels can recede.

If spending doesn’t go down as soon as possible, governments could face a debt crisis down the road that requires “brutal” austerity measures, he says.

“What has happened in this crisis so far is not an indicator of the future,” Harper writes in the Wall Street Journal. “A new era of big government in the economy is unlikely, undesirable and far from inevitable.”

Harper was prime minister from 2006 to 2015, including during the 2008/09 global financial crisis when he brought in a major economic stimulus package in response to the recession. He now runs a consulting firm called Harper & Associates.

In the column he takes aim at “leftists” who see the pandemic measures as a sign that bigger government spending should be the new normal, and that taking on high levels of public debt will be easily manageable down the road.

 

The social distancing measures brought in by governments around the world may be necessary now, he writes, but they are “economically ruinous,” and the “underlying assumption — that the economy can be restarted later as quickly as an idle automobile — is dubious.”

Another problem, he says, is that public-sector balance sheets will be an “unholy mess,” exacerbated by the fact public debt levels were already “dangerously high” before the pandemic hit.

Canada’s parliamentary budget officer recently estimated that the deficit this year could top $252 billion; by comparison, Canada’s biggest deficit during the financial crisis was $55.6 billion in 2009/10.

 

Modern monetary theorists’ will prattle on about how with low interest rates and monetary expansion this does not matter,” Harper writes. “Their core belief — that governments can never really run out of money — is nonsensical.”

DEFAULTING ON DEBT

He notes that Mexico faced default and Canada came close in the 1990s due to public debt, and many countries faced major debt problems in the 2008/09 financial crisis.

“This time will probably be much worse,” he writes. “Governments began this episode with poorer balance sheets, and central-bank actions effectively nationalized much corporate debt…If they fail to practice mild austerity proactively, a brutal kind will be thrust on them.”

Harper concludes by warning that governments will face pressure to keep spending levels high without raising taxes, particularly as those on public sector salaries have been spared the devastating effect of COVID-19 on their incomes.

Because of that, he says a smaller government response may not happen regardless of the evidence in favour of it.

Governments that resist restoring free enterprise and fiscal responsibility will experience recession and stagnation,” Harper says. “Those that do the right things will lead their countries to a far more prosperous future.”

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/big-spending-on-covid-19-now-should-lead-to-smaller-government-later-stephen-harper-argues-in-essay?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook#Echobox=1589387526

 

 

Edited by Jaydee
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PRIME MINISTER JUSTIN TRUDEAU HAS SPOKEN WITH 28 WORLD LEADERS SINCE THE COVID-19 CRISIS BEGAN, AS HE CONTINUES TO PURSUE A TEMPORARY SEAT ON THE UN SECURITY COUNCIL, HIS DAILY ITINERARIES SHOW.

Government ‘absolutely wants’ seat

  • Calgary Herald
  • 15 May 2020
  • RYAN TUMILTY
img?regionKey=SbVd8mJlJGjRa7UbNrgxbg%3d%3dADRIAN WYLD/ THE CANADIAN PRESS Prime Minister Justin Trudeau walks to the podium for his daily briefing outside Rideau Cottage in Ottawa on Thursday.

OTTAWA • Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has spoken with 28 world leaders since the pandemic crisis began in early March as he continues to pursue a temporary seat on the UN Security Council, according to his daily itineraries.

That has meant making time for conversations with leaders of the tiny island nations of Saint Lucia, Fiji and Tuvalu, amid a pandemic that has sickened thousands and shuttered much of the economy. Leaders also contacted since March have included those in Kenya, Rwanda, Senegal, Sweden, Colombia, Ghana, Sudan, Qatar, Jamaica and Ethiopia, among others.

“We absolutely want a seat on the UN security council,” Foreign Affairs Minister François-philippe Champagne reiterated in an interview Thursday. Trudeau made garnering a seat on the Security Council a top priority for Champagne when he was moved to foreign affairs last fall.

Trudeau’s staff say the primary purpose of the calls is to discuss the global response to COVID-19 and its health and economic impacts, but acknowledge that the UN Security Council bid is sometimes raised.

Saint Lucia and Fiji have just 18 cases of COVID-19 each and Tuvalu, an island with just over 11,000 residents, has so far kept the virus out.

Canada is in a tight battle with Norway and Ireland for two possible seats, with the vote scheduled for next month.

Trudeau travelled to Africa in early February on a tour meant to drum up support for Canada’s bid, and was scheduled to attend a meeting of Caribbean leaders after that, but the Caribbean trip was cancelled, with Trudeau returning home to deal with protests that had blocked vital rail lines across Canada.

Champagne said the entire government is focused on COVID-19, including his own ministry, which is focusing on bringing more Canadians home who remain stuck abroad. But it is also thinking about the future.

“It is also important that we spend time on the rebuild and the world that we want POST-COVID,” he said. “We need to keep an eye on the future that we want and how we want to shape it.”

He said the government wants the seat because it’s a chance to shape the world’s response on any number of issues.

“The UN security council is the big table. This is where the most consequential decisions are taken with respect to peace and security around the world,” he said. “It is the first time in generations the world has been on pause, and I think, before we push play, Canadians want us to play a role on the international scene.”

If Canada wins next month’s vote, it will take its seat at the table next year, for a two-year term.

“The most interesting thing about the value of a security council seat is you don’t know how valuable it will be until you’re on the council,” said Adam Chapnick, a professor at the Royal Military College and author of a book on Canada and the UN.

Chapnick said having a seat at the table is an opportunity to forge ties with some of the world’s most important nations.

“Unless you’ve got really lousy diplomats, which we do not, you will inevitably build some relationships that you don’t have the opportunity to build when you aren’t on the council.”

He said he believes Canada has a 50/50 shot at actually getting the seat, but securing the seat has become difficult in the pandemic environment.

“There is no recipe for how you finish a campaign under COVID.”

Christopher Sands, the director of the Canada Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Centre in Washington, D.C., said there is political pressure on Trudeau to keep pursuing the seat, even amid the pandemic crisis.

“He almost has to, because the Liberals were so tough on (former prime minister Stephen) Harper for not appearing to try hard enough when Canada last tried,” he said. “If Trudeau doesn’t try, I think it will make him look much weaker.”

Canada pursued a seat in 2010 under the Conservative government, but lost to Portugal, despite the Harper government having received written promises of support from a majority of UN members, many of whom later reneging on that promise.

That broke Canada’s record of winning a place on the 15-member body once a decade since the UN’S inception.

Sands said Canada is in for a tough fight. Norway has been chasing its seat for years, and has increased foreign-aid commitments to secure the seat. He said Ireland’s bid has also been formidable and they have a lot of goodwill in the world.

“There are not a lot of people who hate the Irish, so I think it’s going to be very hard for Canada this time.”

He noted that Canada also has a mixed record when it has sat on the council in the past, often failing to achieve much while there.

THIS IS WHERE THE MOST CONSEQUENTIAL DECISIONS ARE

TAKEN

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I wouldn't be opposed to Canada getting a seat on the security council if it wasn't for the reason of pushing Liberal agenda on the rest of the world.

 

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reason of pushing Liberal agenda

I don’t know if I would call it the Liberal agenda so much as the “trudeau”agenda.....and that probably is a misnomer....Do we really know who is pulling the puppets strings??

(there goes that damn conspiracy theory thing again 🤨🤨)

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10 hours ago, seeker said:

I wouldn't be opposed to Canada getting a seat on the security council if it wasn't for the reason of pushing Liberal agenda on the rest of the world.

 

Not sure why we would want to be on it.  Take a look at the current membership and also examine the  real achievements of the council in the last decade?  No concrete ones seem to jump out.

Current Members

 

PERMANENT AND NON-PERMANENT MEMBERS

The Council is composed of 15 Members:

Five permanent members: China, France, Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, and the United States, and ten non-permanent members elected for two-year terms by the General Assembly (with end of term year):

Non-Council Member States

More than 50 United Nations Member States have never been Members of the Security Council.

A State which is a Member of the United Nations but not of the Security Council may participate, without a vote, in its discussions when the Council considers that country's interests are affected. Both Members and non-members of the United Nations, if they are parties to a dispute being considered by the Council, may be invited to take part, without a vote, in the Council's discussions; the Council sets the conditions for participation by a non-member State.

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Justin Trudeau: “Our plan on pricing pollution puts more money upfront into people’s pockets than they would pay with the new price on pollution. We’re going to continue to focus on putting more money in people’s pockets to support them right across the country.”

If there was only a mechanism available to the Canadian public to ask trudeau what the f#$k that means and explain how in reality it would work...how does increasing a tax on an essential like gas or propane “put money upfront into people’s pockets”???.actual scrutiny of the plan...instead of his little wack-a-mole daily briefings with screened q&a sessions or the feeble non answers given in parliament.

 

 

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When you were born with a silver spoon, I guess there is nothing you will not take for granted unless of course you are not talking about yourself.

Trudeau sees travel between PM's 'cottages' as trips between work and home

Published Saturday, May 16, 2020 8:51AM EDT
 
 

OTTAWA -- While Canadians are being counselled to avoid travelling to their cottages during the COVID-19 pandemic, Justin Trudeau is expected to spend the first long weekend of the summer season travelling between two cottages.

Except that in his case the "cottages" are actually official prime ministerial residences -- one of which has become his family's primary residence during the crisis while the other has been turned into Trudeau's primary office as he, like millions of other Canadians, works from home as much as possible to curb the spread of the deadly coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Trudeau's travel between the two caused something of a furor when he posted an Easter weekend photo of him posing with his wife, Sophie Gregoire Trudeau, and their three children at what's known as the prime minister's cottage or summer retreat -- a 16-room, Colonial Revival heritage house that sits on a 5.4-hectare property, along with three other smaller "cottages," overlooking Harrington Lake in Quebec's Gatineau hills.

But the way Trudeau sees it, he's simply travelling between his work in Ottawa and his family's home 30 minutes away, across the river in Quebec -- just like many other Quebecers.

"Since I work at the residence in Ottawa and I do press conferences every day, it was not ideal for the children to stay there, so they went to the other official residence (at Harrington Lake)," he told popular Quebec television talk show Tout le monde en parle a couple of weeks ago.

"And I spend several nights a week with the family, then I go down to work in the city like many Quebecers who live in the Outaouais."

He added: "I think people understand that I have to work in Ottawa even if I live a lot with my family in Quebec."

This weekend will be no different.

Trudeau is to start today with what has become his routine daily briefing on the pandemic outside Rideau Cottage -- a 22-room heritage home on the grounds of Rideau Hall, the governor general's estate.

However, he'll give no updates Sunday or Monday, when he's expected to join his family at Harrington Lake.

The Trudeau family has lived primarily in Rideau Cottage since he took office in 2015 because the prime minister's official residence at 24 Sussex has been deemed virtually uninhabitable without millions in renovations. A succession of prime ministers has balked at the price tag.

As it happens, the National Capital Commission, which is responsible for maintaining official residences, recently disclosed that it is spending $8.6 million on renovations to the Harrington Lake retreat.

Trudeau's family has been living at Harrington Lake since shortly after Gregoire Trudeau, who was diagnosed with COVID-19, recovered in late March.

At today's daily briefing, Trudeau is expected to focus on a one-time boost to the Canada Child Benefit, which goes into effect next week, to help families cope with the economic devastation wrought by the pandemic.

Families that were entitled to the benefit in April and still have an eligible child in their care this month will get up to $300 extra per child as part of their regular monthly payment.

Trudeau is also expected to highlight various federal measures aimed at helping charities and women's shelters weather the crisis.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 16, 2020.

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On 5/12/2020 at 3:51 PM, Jaydee said:

My impressions of Hong Kong .....it was like watching ( in real time  ) what it must be like living inside an Ant Hill

Hong Kong is actually pretty civilized compared to mainland China, night and day difference.

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On 5/10/2020 at 3:49 PM, st27 said:

Will Trudeau invite his Chinese friends to come pick up the pieces of what will be left of Canada?

More troubling news for the sovereignty of the country....

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China’s growing control over strategic minerals could be a threat to Canada’s national security, a former head of CSIS says, and Ottawa should recognize this when it reviews a proposed takeover of an Arctic gold mine by a Chinese state-owned conglomerate.

Shandong Gold Mining Co. Ltd., one of the world’s largest gold producers, is paying $207.4-million to buy TMAC Resources Inc., the latest struggling Canadian junior miner to be swept up by a larger and better-capitalized company.

Mr. Fadden, who was also national security adviser to Stephen Harper and Justin Trudeau, said there had been growing concerns within Canadian national-security agencies about how China was carefully investing in Canadian companies “so as to be beneath regulatory thresholds.”

“There was a worry that the Chinese seemed to be very knowledgeable about regulatory thresholds and were coming just underneath them and, as is well known, Chinese corporations abroad are required to comply with Chinese government directives,” he said. “If you had enough of these, either beneath regulatory thresholds or small investments, they would eventually be consolidated and there would not be very much anyone could do about it,”


https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-ottawa-urged-to-scrutinize-chinas-mining-activities-in-the-arctic-in/

And still no decision on Huawei......

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Ottawa’s debt headed for ‘previously inconceivable’ $1 trillion — and that’s without any new spending

We have already heard that Canada’s deficit will likely hit a record this year, but now one think-tank is warning that the federal net debt is headed for the “previously inconceivable” level of $1 trillion.

The C.D. Howe Institute said in a note this week that however necessary Ottawa’s aid may have been on the way into this crisis, , “it is becoming clear that we cannot afford this level of spending for as long as the coronavirus may be with us.”

Canada’s Parliamentary Budget Officer said last month that the nation’s budget deficit will swell to $252.1 billion in 2020-21, the largest on record as a share of the economy since at least the mid-1960s.

C.D. Howe ran three economic scenarios for 2020 and 2021 – baseline, optimistic, and pessimistic — on the assumption, and this is important, that spending measures announced this year do not extend into the future.

Taking the PBO forecast as a starting point, the baseline scenario sees deficits of $73 billion next year, and more than $50 billion per year from 2022/23 to 2024/25. The federal debt reaches 49.1% of GDP by 2025. The optimistic scenario has deficits of $232 billion in 2020/21 and $46 billion next year, with federal debt reaching about 40% of GDP by 2024/25. In the pessimistic scenario, the deficit hits $266 billion this year, $85 billion next year and almost $70 billion by 2024/25, by which time the federal debt hits 54% of GDP.

“The striking result is how much red ink the federal government shows in all scenarios, long after temporary income supports such as the CERB and the CEWS have ended. Without major changes, Ottawa’s net debt will shortly hit $1 trillion,” it said.

Significantly, none of these scenarios include extending existing income supports, the introduction of new ones or stimulus spending during the recovery. C.D. Howe said if those were added in deficits and debt could be $100 billion or even $200 billion higher.

The provinces face the real hard work ahead, the institute said, as already strained health budgets struggle to deal with the extra load of the coronavirus.

“Ottawa needs to rein in its spending and borrowing – if only so that provincial governments, who have the heavier lifting to do as their healthcare systems adapt, will have the tax and borrowing room they will need,” it said.

https://business.financialpost.com/executive/posthaste-ottawas-debt-headed-for-previously-inconceivable-1-trillion-economists-warn-and-thats-without-any-new-spending


 

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