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Malcolm

All About Justin / The good, the bad and the ugly

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So Deicer... “They're all greasy.  It's all just political theater in an election year“ 

This doesn’t seem to be the case, as the OECD has concerns how this liberal government is interferring with the country’s judicial system.

Lets have a real judicial inquiry a la Gomery or let the RCMP investigate and take the politics out of the show.

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Gday Wolfhunter

You stated the investigation started during Harpers reign, money spent, yet nothing found.

St27

A judicial inquiry?  Sure, have at it.  Again, millions will be spent to find nothing and there will be no repercussions.  Just like most of them in the past.

Wilson Rebould herself said nothing illegal happened.  

So what is there to investigate?

Edited to add:

We have a 'hurt feelings' report at work, should we send one to Ottawa for them to fill out?

Hurt.jpg

Edited by deicer

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Do you think spending millions would matter to a liberal if it meant clearing up the their image going into an election? They are squandering BILLIONS!

Reybould Wilson said nothing illegal happened.....do you think as Justice Minister she would admit to an illegal act occurring, and not doing anything about it??  Something was going on and she didn’t want to incriminate herself in the judicial committee.

So lets clear the air and find out what went on.

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12 hours ago, Malcolm said:

Here you go:

A small piece of the puzzle and of little concern to me. 

deicer - The influence exerted on the minister is of no interest to me either if the "crimes" were a simple matter of cash bribes, hookers and apartment renovations (although breaking Canadian law in Canada should have a price tag). Everyone in Libya and host of other places pays bucksheesh including the CBC... how do you think correspondents travel freely and gain access to areas and key people. It is simply a fact of life and of no concern to me.

As all of you likely know, there was a UN imposed travel ban on the Gaddafi clan (among other government leaders) and a UN imposed asset (financial) freeze on the same folks. Was SNC involved in money washing for the Gaddafi's and were they involved in facilitating escape plans to Niger and Mexico? Did they pay for the "fact finding mission" in Libya and the operative in Mexico? The fact that they were suspected of being involved in both seems to have gotten lost in transit. Maybe it's in the same box as my hurt feelings eh? 

It's stuff like this that has the potential to hurt my feelings.... cast your mind back to 2011.

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/how-the-post-revealed-the-failed-plot-to-smuggle-saadi-gaddafi-into-mexico

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/cynthia-vanier-began-plotting-gaddafi-sons-escape-in-early-2011-snc-lavalin

If SNC was part of this, and the government knew they were part of it and still wanted a DPA, then yes, my delicate feelings are hurt and I'll fill out your form. If that is not the case all of this is fluff IMO. It's that simple and that complicated. Where does the "and nothing found" notion come from? I would like to share in it....

Edited by Wolfhunter

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1 hour ago, Wolfhunter said:

A small piece of the puzzle and of little concern to me. As is the hurt feelings report.   

The influence exerted on the minister is of no interest to me either if the "crimes" were a simple matter of cash bribes, hookers and apartment renovations (although breaking Canadian law in Canada should have a price tag). Everyone in Libya and host of other places pays bucksheesh including the CBC... how do you think correspondents travel freely and gain access to areas and key people. It is simply a fact of life and of no concern to me.

As all of you likely know, there was a UN imposed travel ban on the Gaddafi clan (among other government leaders) and a UN imposed asset (financial) freeze on the same folks. Was SNC involved in money washing for the Gaddafi's and were they involved in facilitating escape plans to Niger and Mexico? Did they pay for the "fact finding mission" in Libya and the operative in Mexico? The fact that they were suspected of being involved in both seems to have gotten lost in transit. Maybe it's in the same box as my hurt feelings eh? 

It's stuff like this that has the potential to hurt my feelings.... cast your mind back to 2011.

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/how-the-post-revealed-the-failed-plot-to-smuggle-saadi-gaddafi-into-mexico

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/cynthia-vanier-began-plotting-gaddafi-sons-escape-in-early-2011-snc-lavalin

If SNC was part of this, and the government knew they were part of it and still wanted a DPA, then yes, my delicate feelings are hurt and I'll fill out your form. If that is not the case all of this is fluff IMO. It's that simple and that complicated. Where does the "and nothing found" notion come from? I would like to share in it....

Wolf, your piece would make it seem that the form was from a post of mine.  Def. was not. Please give credit where credit is due.  🤬

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7 hours ago, Malcolm said:

Wolf, your piece would make it seem that the form was from a post of mine.  Def. was not. Please give credit where credit is due.  🤬

I left out the word deicer.... amended accordingly. Sorry

My point remains though, we are completely unaware of the type and extent of of wrong doing by SNC. And yet, Liberal supporters seem content with the notion of "nothing to see here." I read (in an editorial piece) that there is actually a publication ban on this information (but don't know for sure). It would explain why I can't find anything. It would explain a few other things as well.

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Another shuffle of the Liberal Deck of Cards.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to shuffle cabinet Monday: sources

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will shuffle his cabinet for the third time in three months on Monday, CBC News has learned — filling the gap left by the dramatic departure of Jane Philpott last month over the government's handling of the SNC-Lavalin affair.

Trudeau needs to change his lineup following Jane Philpott's unexpected resignation

 
john-paul-tasker.JPG
John Paul Tasker · CBC News · Posted: Mar 15, 2019 4:56 PM ET | Last Updated: 6 minutes ago
 
. CBC News has learned Trudeau will shuffle his cabinet again on Monday. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press
 
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will shuffle his cabinet for the third time in three months on Monday, CBC News has learned — filling the gap left by the dramatic departure of Jane Philpott last month over the government's handling of the SNC-Lavalin affair.

Three government sources — speaking to CBC News on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly — have confirmed the prime minister will announce changes to his cabinet on Monday to fill the gap left by Philpott, who last served as Treasury Board president.

One option for replacing Philpott is to appoint current Public Services and Procurement Minister Carla Qualtrough to the Treasury Board post. Qualtrough, a Vancouver-area MP, temporarily assumed Treasury Board responsibilities after Philpott quit cabinet on March 4.

Before she moved from Indigenous Services to the Treasury Board role to replace a retiring Scott Brison, Philpott served as vice-chair of the Treasury Board cabinet committee. Qualtrough is a member of that cabinet committee and is well-placed to assume control of the ministry.

In her role as public services minister, Qualtrough has worked closely with Treasury Board on a number of major files, including the quest for a permanent fix for the error-prone Phoenix public service pay system.

While the presidency of the Treasury Board is largely a role that doesn't involve a lot of public engagement, it's also very important to the machinery of government.

The Treasury Board is responsible for accountability and ethics, financial, personnel and administrative management, comptrollership, approving regulations and cabinet orders. In short, the president oversees management of the public purse and ensures government is well managed.

The president of the Treasury Board is also responsible for negotiating 27 collective agreements with 15 different bargaining agents.

Philpott resigned only three days after the prime minister's last shuffle on March 1, which was prompted by Jody Wilson-Raybould's resignation from the veterans portfolio. Wilson-Raybould's resignation was part of the fallout from a Globe and Mail report that documented the alleged pressure she faced while attorney general to negotiate a deferred prosecution agreement (DPA) with the Quebec engineering firm SNC-Lavalin so that it could avoid a trial on bribery charges.

Philpott, meanwhile, cited the government's handling of the SNC-Lavalin file as her motive for resigning: "Sadly, I have lost confidence in how the government has dealt with this matter and in how it has responded to the issues raised."

 

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March 15, 2019 3:16 pm

Roy Green: Silencing Jody Wilson-Raybould? Good luck with that

630CHED
Roy Green By Roy Green Host, Corus Radio Network  Global News
 

If the federal Liberals are of the view they can, with a one-vote majority in the House of Commons justice committee, silence Jody Wilson-Raybould, Trudeau’s former attorney general sent a clear message on Thursday: “good luck with that.”

Liberals on the justice committee played their winning hand Wednesday with a vote of five to four, almost immediately shutting down an opposition emergency meeting intended to once again put Ms. Wilson-Raybould before the committee — most likely in response to testimony offered about her by Trudeau’s former principal secretary Gerald Butts and Michael Wernick, Clerk of the Privy Council.

READ MORE: Liberals block bid to immediately debate Wilson-Raybould reappearing at committee on SNC-Lavalin

Francis Drouin, the Liberal MP who initiated the quick Wednesday committee adjournment, told CBC that Conservative and NDP members were playing politics with the timing of their emergency meeting call, pointing to March 19 as already scheduled to plot upcoming committee actions.

WATCH: Why do MPs want to hear from Jody Wilson-Raybould again?

jwr.jpg?w=670&quality=70&strip=all

Who’s playing politics, though, may be a fair question. March 19 is the day Finance Minister Bill Morneau will deliver the new federal budget, thereby likely directing media focus largely away from any justice committee deliberation.

Drouin, who was a committee fill-in Wednesday, declared, “I think I’ve heard enough.”

“I don’t think Mr. Trudeau is calling the shots,” he added later.

Not enough has been heard for Wilson-Raybould. In a letter to constituents of her Vancouver Granville riding Thursday, the former attorney general wrote, “recent events have been a wake-up call for many across the country. These matters are still unfolding and further clarity and information is needed,” adding, “our democratic institutions and norms — including the rule of law and prosecutorial independence — are under pressure. Collectively, and as individuals, we are challenged to respond.”

READ MORE: Jody Wilson-Raybould confirms plans to run for re-election as a Liberal in letter to constituents

Few Canadians are likely to sign on to Drouin’s “I don’t think Mr. Trudeau is calling the shots” view.  If that were the case, the immediate question would become, who is?  And shouldn’t a prime minister indeed be the ultimate decision-maker and course-setter, at least as far as core issues affecting his or her government is concerned?

It’s not surprising the Liberals want to tack away from the SNC/PMO/Justin Trudeau/Wilson-Raybould compass point. National polling is painting an increasingly worrisome picture for the party’s October election fortunes. Ditto for polling specifically in Quebec.

Where Mr. Trudeau’s Quebec base appeared firm, the picture isn’t nearly as rosy. A Leger poll for the Journal de Montreal shows Liberal support declining from 39 per cent to 35 per cent since the SNC-Lavalin issue surfaced, while support for Conservatives has climbed from 21 to 26 per cent.

The Green Party, meanwhile, has almost doubled its support, rising from five to nine per cent. The Bloc Quebecois slid from 21-17 per cent, the NDP from eight to seven per cent, and Maxime Bernier’s PPC brings up the rear at four per cent — a drop of two percentage points.

Ultimately, what might be most disturbing for Trudeau and LPC leaders are these words in Wilson-Raybould’s letter to her constituents: “I intend to stand for re-election as the Liberal candidate for Vancouver Granville in the 2019 federal election.”

Will Wilson-Raybould’s Liberal Party candidacy, as well as her determined continued public presence, prove more of a re-election hindrance to Trudeau than even Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives and the others in the chase for October 21 electoral success?

Roy Green is the host of the Roy Green Show on the Global News Radio network

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27 minutes ago, Malcolm said:

Three government sources — speaking to CBC News on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly

Ethics and integrity stand at the very heart of the governments problem, it seems to defy solution. Either these folks deliberately violated their duty to maintain confidentiality or the leak was authorized by government and "sold" as a leak for some political purpose.... I'm not even sure which is worse and maybe they are so far gone that it doesn't even matter. 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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15 hours ago, Malcolm said:

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to shuffle cabinet Monday

 

980ED470-52F0-4EF2-8025-6A0D48778EC3.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee

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And just when the SNC Lav scam dies down, the Liberals will face scrutiny with the VA Mark Norman trial:

Quote

After forming government in the fall of 2015 the Liberals received a letter from Irving complaining the company’s own supply ship proposal had not been given due consideration. Irving has consistently denied it made any attempt to undercut a rival shipbuilder via political interference. Nonetheless, after receiving the letter the Liberals decided to pause the Davie project, a decision that leaked to the media. The resulting backlash was seen as a factor in the Liberal’s decision to eventually proceed with the Davie deal.

In the aftermath, federal officials called in the RCMP to hunt down the source of the leak.

In building a defence for Norman, his lawyers have taken aim at former Treasury Board President Scott Brison’s links to the Irving family and Brison’s role in the government’s plan to delay the Davie deal.

Brison has denied any wrongdoing or lobbying on behalf of the Irvings. In late January he asked for legal standing in the Norman case to “protect against unmerited intrusions into his privacy, and to ensure that disclosure requests are clear and complete.” Brison announced in January he was resigning from cabinet and would not seek re-election, and last month he quit as the MP for the Nova Scotia riding of Kings-Hants.

One salient point, which I’m sure will be brought out by the defense is that Trudeau boasted that charges would be brought against, even BEFORE the RCMP started investigating!

https://theprovince.com/news/politics/tories-accuse-trudeau-of-political-interference-in-vice-admiral-mark-norman-case/wcm/56b41f4c-3858-474e-a14b-b1da73bdf417

And now the Post is reporting a privacy issue with the government leaking info to IRving about a reporters request for government info on another shipbuilding contract.

https://nationalpost.com/news/investigation-launched-by-federal-officials-after-postmedia-information-provided-to-irving-shipbuilding

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Some news instead of another cartoon.

ON INFRASTRUCTURE FILE, ALL TRUDEAU HAS BUILT ARE TOWERING EXPECTATIONS

If feds are serious about it, they will remove politics from equation as much as possible

  • Calgary Herald
  • 16 Mar 2019
  • KEVIN CARMICHAEL kcarmichael@postmedia.com Twitter.com/CarmichaelKevin
img?regionKey=DBJhslDghIq5g2THrhN%2fnA%3d%3dTREVOR HAGAN/THE CANADIAN PRESS Prime Minister Justin Trudeau took about $90 billion left unspent by the Harper government, budgeted about $100 billion in new spending, and unveiled to much fanfare a record-setting commitment to infrastructure. Yet only about $19 billion of that money has been spent, writes Kevin Carmichael.

Public administration is hard enough when all a government wants to do is tinker; a tax cut here, a few rule changes there, maybe a new trade agreement if the stars align.

It is extremely difficult when the objective is transformative change; think Jean Chrétien’s and Paul Martin’s overhaul of Canadian fiscal policy in the 1990s or the exertions of the Democratic majority in Washington to introduce universal health care in 2010.

This brings us to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s infrastructure program, the latest reminder that good ideas don’t implement themselves.

In 2015, Trudeau told us voters that he would abandon balanced budgets in order to build roads, bridges, metro lines and other infrastructure that would make Canada’s economy bigger and more competitive. Canadian voters endorsed a return to deficit financing in surprisingly strong numbers. Four years later, many of those people must be disenchanted, notwithstanding what they might think of the prime minister’s ditching of electoral reform, his star-crossed sojourn in India, and his decision to take the side of the white men running SNC-Lavalin over the Indigenous woman running his justice department.

Trudeau took about $90 billion left unspent by Stephen Harper’s government, budgeted about $100 billion in new spending, and unveiled to much fanfare a record-setting commitment to infrastructure. Yet only about $19 billion of that money has been spent, the National Post’s Jesse Snyder reported on March 13, citing Infrastructure Canada data. The Parliamentary Budget Office reported last year that program was responsible for a “modest” increase in gross domestic product, and said this week that provinces appear to have used the promise of money from the feds as an excuse to reduce their own infrastructure budgets. Meanwhile, the budget deficit, which Trudeau once promised to erase by 2019, is about $20 billion and the economy nearly stalled in the fourth quarter.

“Expectations were too high, they were unrealistic,” Mahmood Nanji, a former Ontario finance ministry official who now is director of the Lawrence Centre for Policy and Management at Ivey Business School, told me in a phone interview on March 14.

Trudeau shares the same political lineage as Chrétien and Martin, and he and then U.S. president Barack Obama reportedly became fast friends. Either those men are poor mentors, or Trudeau is an uninterested student, because he appears to have missed the most important lessons of the 1990’s budget cuts and the tortured history of Obamacare.

The previous Liberal government’s austerity program was successful because Martin managed expectations, which helped him demonstrate success. That kept the public behind him.

Obama and his highly educated advisers devised a program that survived Washington’s gauntlet of lobbyists, but they took the boring part — implementation — for granted. The website on which many Americans were to purchase their subsidized health plans crashed out of the gate, and it took months to get it working. The failure emboldened the Republican campaign to repeal the law. The Democratic Party lost control of the House of Representatives and the Senate, and Obama never really recovered politically.

Trudeau’s experience with infrastructure mirrors Obama’s star-crossed experiment with health policy. He had the right idea. Canada had been underfunding infrastructure for decades, and it showed in the country’s miserable productivity numbers. A significant body of research shows that spending that boosts competitiveness will pay for itself through stronger economic growth. Canada is better off now that the balanced-budget spell has been broken.

But some politicians continue to see red ink as the answer to everything. And now, the fiscal zealots have the upper hand in the debate because the infrastructure program hasn’t delivered what was promised. “They developed an infrastructure policy with zero evidence or research on the economic benefits,” Matt Jeneroux, the Conservative infrastructure critic, said after the release of the latest critical PBO report.

That matters. In January, Nanji and some co-authors at Ivey published a paper that aims to get policy-makers thinking differently about infrastructure. They describe six macro risks that they contend are responsible for delays, poor decisions, and blown project budgets. One of those is political risk.

Nanji reckons Canada needs to spend billions of dollars more a year than is currently budgeted to reach its economic potential. Yet it’s fair to wonder what would become of Trudeau’s existing infrastructure promises if he loses the election. Before the SNC-Lavalin scandal broke, the Opposition was spending most of its time making a fuss over the deficit. If the Conservatives win, and balancing the budget becomes a priority, the infrastructure program would be an obvious place to cut.

“In good economic times, a balanced budget should be in the forefront of politicians’ minds,” said Nanji. However, given the infrastructure deficit, he added that politicians should be asking a different question: “What is a reasonable deficit that you can manage?”

You reduce political risk by creating systems that shield strategic policy decisions from the election cycle.

The Trudeau government has tended to blame the provinces for failing to figure out how they wanted to spend the money, but the feds should have seen it coming. Australia has an independent agency that assess what the country needs to maximize its economic potential. Nanji’s report proposes that Canada’s various levels of government could agree on a list of priority projects that are worth of funding, regardless of who is in power at any given time.

Here’s the point: A country that is serious about infrastructure will remove politics from the equation to the greatest extent possible. Something for Trudeau to consider, if it isn’t already too late.

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GRITS’ DOUBLE STANDARD

Quick to point fingers but ignore own missteps

  • Calgary Sun
  • 17 Mar 2019
  • LORRIE GOLDSTEIN lgoldstein@postmedia.com @sunlorrie
img?regionKey=U8%2b0YqezHozRwwSil6kWFg%3d%3dMARTY MELVILLE/GETTY IMAGES Police officers move flowers closer to the Dean Ave. mosque in Christchurch Saturday.

Liberals condemning Conservative leader Andrew Scheer for not adequately denouncing the terrorist attack on Muslims at prayer in New Zealand by a suspected white supremacist would be more convincing if they weren’t so inadequate at denouncing Islamist terrorism themselves.

To be clear, the horrific attack on Muslims praying at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, should be universally condemned and raises global concerns about the increasing incidence of such attacks, including in Canada, by terrorists espousing the same evil ideology.

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern spoke for decent people everywhere when she said of the victims, including Muslim refugees and migrants who had chosen New Zealand as their home:

“It is their home. They are us.”

By contrast, she said: “The person who has perpetuated this violence against us is not. They have no place in New Zealand. There is no place in New Zealand for such acts of extreme and unprecedented violence.”

Scheer is being pilloried because his initial response condemning the attack through a two-part tweet didn’t mention the victims were Muslims at prayer in two mosques — an omission for which Environment Minister Catherine McKenna accused him of Islamophobia, or as she put it in a tweet:

“I spoke to parents at Ottawa Main Mosque today whose kids are too scared to pray & go to school. In Canada.

Meanwhile, Andrew Scheer has to be called out before he can call out Islamophobia.”

Except Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale didn’t mention the attack was on Muslims in his initial tweets on the tragedy either, which were more than eight hours after Scheer’s.

To be fair, Goodale did so 43 minutes after his initial tweets, when he identified the victims as Muslims and condemned “right-wing extremism.”

Both Scheer and Goodale subsequently made fuller statements condemning the attack and expressing solidarity with Muslims in Canada and globally.

If McKenna thinks Scheer is Islamophobic for initially failing to mention Muslims, is Prime Minister Justin Trudeau anti-Semitic for twice failing to mention that 6 million Jews died in the Holocaust?

The first time was in his 2016 statement commemorating International Holocaust Remembrance Day, the second at the

2017 dedication of Ottawa’s Holocaust Memorial, where the plaque for the inauguration, issued specifically in Trudeau’s name, with the PM attending the ceremony, failed to mention Jews or for that matter anti-Semitism.

So what is the Liberals’ argument?

That Scheer’s failure to identify Muslims as victims of terrorism in his initial tweets is evidence of Islamophobia, while Trudeau twice failing to mention 6 million Jews died in the Holocaust was an honest mistake? Because that would be hypocrisy.

Back in the real world, equally deplorable to terrorist attacks by white supremacists are attacks by Islamist-inspired terrorists, whether they’re on innocent people at prayer, or walking down the street, or running a marathon, or having a meal in a café.

In both cases we are dealing with twisted individuals who have abandoned human decency, willing to murder innocents in support of their twisted, hate-filled ideologies.

Why then is it so easy for Liberals to condemn terror by white supremacists but so hard for them to condemn Islamist or Islamist-inspired terrorism?

Why is their condemnation of terror of the first kind swift and specific, but slow and vague in the second, often attributing it instead to such factors as mental illness or feelings of people being “completely excluded?”

Why this double standard?

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4 hours ago, st27 said:

still waiting for more details on the Danforth attacks.

The Danforth attack was the catalyst for Liberal gun control action and you are not going to see results until after the new legislation is passed and announcements on handguns have been made. The police are playing right along with this.

The results will show it to have a terrorism component with no rational connection to the gun control actions intended. Once in place and binding, the Danforth investigation results will then be irrelevant (insofar as the legislation is concerned). Right now, it is too good of a tool to lose and would invite unwanted discussion on cause and effect. In all of this, I have been most disappointed in the conduct and ethics of the police. 

 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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29 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

The Danforth attack was the catalyst for Liberal gun control action and you are not going to see results until after the new legislation is passed and announcements on handguns have been made. The police are playing right along with this.

The results will show it to have a terrorism component with no rational connection to the gun control actions intended. Once in place and binding, the Danforth investigation results will then be irrelevant (insofar as the legislation is concerned). Right now, it is too good of a tool to lose and would invite unwanted discussion on cause and effect. In all of this, I have been most disappointed in the conduct and ethics of the police. 

 

Canada’s police chiefs to study data related to gun violence

 
Keith Doucette
HALIFAX
The Canadian Press
Published August 15, 2018Updated August 15, 2018

Canada’s police chiefs say in light of recent gun-related tragedies in Fredericton and in other cities across the country they are striking a committee to analyze data related to gun violence.

The Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, which wrapped up its annual conference Wednesday in Halifax, says it wants to come up with evidence-based recommendations to help combat the problem.

Vancouver Police Chief Adam Palmer, the newly elected president of the association, said while gun violence “ebbs and flows” across the country, the chiefs believe there has been a spike in illegal firearm use over the past year.

“We are seeing in many cities, small and large throughout our country, an increase in gun violence whether its Vancouver, Toronto, Winnipeg or out here in the Maritimes, we are seeing an increase in that,” said Palmer.

He said Canada’s current gun control regime is “actually very good” and the association is not calling for any wholesale legislative changes related to gun violence. It also isn’t calling for tighter restrictions for rifles and shotguns.

“But we are going to be looking at that issue (violence) and we may come forward with recommendations in the future.”

Palmer said the association does support measures to strengthen certain aspects of federal gun regulations in Bill C-71, including rules around obtaining a gun licence and the transportation of firearms.

Last week, Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction Bill Blair said the latest rash of shootings had added to a sense of public urgency for Ottawa to do more to keep deadly firearms out of the wrong hands.

Blair said the government’s work would include looking at “any measure which will be effective.”

Palmer said the overall issue isn’t law-abiding people who want to possess firearms, but rather people who are involved in criminal activity who obtain guns through illegal means.Those means include getting illegal firearms from the U.S., through break-and-enters, and from legal gun owners without criminal records who purchase firearms and then sell them on the black market.

He said less organized street gangs are a particular concern for police.

“We are seeing a resurgence of lower level street gangs that are becoming quite violent, becoming ever more sophisticated and that are starting to connect themselves with organized crime at a higher level,” said Palmer.

Still, Palmer said gun violence is a complex issue that will require many different approaches, from early education for children on the dangers of guns and gangs to better enforcement measures.

“We are looking at different strategies,” he said. “We want to follow best practices in reducing violence.”

On another front, the police chiefs announced a new online training program that will provide an “introduction to the cannabis legislation” for more than 65,000 police officers preparing to enforce the law when cannabis is legalized Oct. 17.

Palmer said police forces will be ready to conduct enforcement in the fall and he doesn’t believe it’s going to be “mayhem overnight” once cannabis is legal.

“It’s a complex issue, it’s a challenging issue ... but we will be ready to deal with this issue.”

Palmer said it would take about a year before police will be able to assess how the introduction of legalized cannabis is handled.

He said the conference also discussed the opioid crisis, crypto-currency, use of force training, mental wellness, and proactive policing.

The chiefs called on Ottawa to harmonize cybercrime training across the country to ensure police officers have the proper training and capability to combat the problem.

They are also urging Public Safety Canada to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act to allow the comprehensive vetting of people who import pill presses, and also to regulate their sale domestically.

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We might need another ATIP inquiring how many lost and stolen police handguns were later found to have been used in the commission of a crime. As it stands now, any such occurrences fall at the feet of registered gun owners and are not attributable to police misconduct.. 

In addition, gun laws provide little deterrent for terrorists since they tend not to follow the rules. When the Danforth information is released, I bet you will see that none of the proposed regulations are/were/or will be applicable and would have had no bearing on the outcome. It has now started in New Zealand. Who would of thought that stopping terrorism events was as easy as instituting a simple ban. If only we knew about this in Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya and ISIS controlled territories eh?

https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/new-zealand-pm-wants-gun-laws-changed-after-mosque-shootings-1.5060507

Edited by Wolfhunter

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March 18, 2019 6:57 am

Updated: March 18, 2019 8:19 am

Liberal MP Joyce Murray, vocal pipeline critic, named new head of Treasury Board in cabinet shuffle

By Amanda Connolly National Online Journalist  Global News
 

Vancouver Quadra MP Joyce Murray was sworn in on Monday as President of the Treasury Board and Minister of Digital Government following Jane Philpott's resignation from cabinet two weeks ago.

 

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has shuffled his cabinet for the third time in three months following the resignations of two prominent members over his handling of the SNC-Lavalin affair.

BC Liberal MP Joyce Murray, a critical voice against the government’s approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline, will take over as President of the Treasury Board and Minister for Digital Government. She has served as the Liberal MP for Vancouver Quadra since 2008 and also ran against Trudeau for the Liberal leadership back in 2013.

READ MORE: Justin Trudeau to shuffle cabinet for 3rd time this year

“My job as a member of Parliament is to represent my community and I did that on the issue of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion,” she said, adding that she shares the concerns flagged by the Federal Court in an injunction halting construction over issues with Indigenous consultation and environmental assessment.

Her appointment brings a longtime member of caucus into cabinet at a time when the government is still fighting to get control of the allegations of attempted political interference in the SNC-Lavalin affair, as well as the resulting resignations of two prominent first-term female cabinet members.

Quote

About the Treasury Board of Canada

The Treasury Board is a Cabinet committee of the Queen’s Privy Council of Canada. It was established in 1867 and given statutory powers in 1869.

The Treasury Board is responsible for accountability and ethics, financial, personnel and administrative management, comptrollership, approving regulations and most Orders-in-Council.

The formal role of the President is to chair the Treasury Board. The President carries out the responsibility for the management of the government by translating the policies and programs approved by Cabinet into operational reality and by providing departments with the resources and the administrative environment they need to do their work. The Treasury Board has an administrative arm, the Secretariat, which was part of the Department of Finance until it was proclaimed a department in 1966.

 

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