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Malcolm

All About Justin / The good, the bad and the ugly

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We call that an election.  We had one just over a year ago.  The people made their choice.

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I made a suggestion that may offer a better way forward Boestar. If election results are the best we can do then I guess there's not much hope that any improvement is possible.

 

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It's a system that works quite well.

The people spoke and we had 9 years of Harper, who on top of the issues I posted just above, allowed his buddies to decide what they wanted funded as their own personal pet projects in their ridings on the public purse.

It was that 9 years of Harper that led us to the massive landslide we saw.  The people spoke.

Just because it may not agree with your personal feelings about how things are run, well, you have an opportunity to change it again in three years.

Having said that, what would the outcome of the next election be if in the next three years things are turned around and much like Obama did in the States, unemployment goes down, the markets go up, and the deficit does start to be reigned in?

It doesn't happen over night.  The conservatives had their turn and blew it, now let's see how the other side does.

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14 hours ago, deicer said:

While I agree that the deficit does need to be brought under control, where I disagree is the virulent rhetoric being thrown already at the current government.

While I don't agree with all that they are doing, it is still early in the mandate.  They have to deal with what they inherited, and it isn't an overnight accomplishment.

If it is that bad, then we will have another government voted in at the next election.

If I was aware that I was in debt I wouldn't be promising to spend millions of dollars on new stuff. Trudeau's been throwing our money away at one pet cause after another. Let him spend his own trust fund first before bankrupting the country. 

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The difference between Trudeau and Harper is that Harper didn't "advertise" it.  He quietly spent it all and then some.

 

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22 hours ago, deicer said:

 

It was that 9 years of Harper that led us to the massive landslide we saw.  The people spoke.

 

While the MAJORITY may have to put up with his ridiculous country destroying policies for another 2 1/2 years before we can correct course. I get that, grin and bear it etc etc.

But "the people spoke" ? Let's at least keep the conversation somewhat real. 

Eligible voters   25,638,379

Liberal votes  6,943,276

In other words 18,795,103 Canadians DID NOT vote for him.

Only 27% of eligible voting Canadians voted Liberal. He got not even close a majority but that is the system we have. In fact he is afraid to go anywhere near asking Canadians how they really feel in a referendum.

He has absolutely no moral right, let alone consensus  to change Canada to his personal liking.

 

Edited by Jaydee

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So 70% of the eligible voters don't give a rats a$$.  Not the issue.  Of the 30% that got off their a$$ to vote the Majority spoke.  Using that as an argument doesn't hold up.  you don't vote then you don't have a say one way or the other.  I wouldn't even let someone who didn't in the federal election vote in a referendum because they obviously don't care.

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Kady O’Malley: Trudeau finds it hard to say ‘sorry’ when it comes to alleged ethics breach

 
‎Today, ‎January ‎17, ‎2017, ‏‎1 hour ago | Kady O'Malley, Ottawa Citizen

Justin Trudeau should have known.

Even before news broke – courtesy of the National Post’s indefatigable David Akin – that the federal ethics watchdog would be launching a formal investigation into the prime minister’s now infamous jaunt to the Aga Khan’s exclusive Bahamian hideaway, it should have been obvious to even the most Pollyanna-ish member of his inner circle – which may or may not be Trudeau himself – that there was only one way to bring this latest conflict-of-interest controversy to a close: an unabashed admission of wrongdoing, a wholehearted apology and some sort of act of public penance that would make it clear that a lesson had been learned.

But it shouldn’t have taken anywhere near that long for that realization to sink in – and the fact that it apparently did should serve as a no-longer-all-that-early warning sign for a government that managed to make it through its first full year in power relatively unscathed by any of the scandalettes that periodically burbled up to the surface.

There is, however, a crucial difference between how Team Trudeau handled the uproar over Health Minister Jane Philpott’s four-figure chauffeur bills, or the outrage following the reveal of tens of thousands of dollars that had been earmarked to cover relocation costs for Trudeau’s top aides, and the strategy employed thus far in fending off the current allegations of ethical improprieties.

In both cases, the players at the centre of the furor – Philpott, and the prime minister’s chief of staff Katie Telford and principal secretary Gerry Butts, respectively – didn’t spend days peevishly defending expenses that they would eventually acknowledge were inappropriate, even if technically within the rules.

Within hours of the story coming out, Philpott was publicly pledging to pay back at least a portion of the costs racked up in ferrying her around the Greater Toronto Area.

While it took a bit longer for Telford and Butts to do the same, they would eventually take the rare step of posting a joint apology to Facebook, in which they admitted that some of the reimbursements, while in line with longstanding government policy, were “unreasonable,” and would be refunded to the treasury.

“As this process relates to us, we were eligible to be reimbursed for a bunch of costs that we don’t feel comfortable about,” the statement notes.

“While the rules were clear and we followed them, we both know that’s not always enough.”

Trudeau, of course, can’t make the same claim.

In fact, the position in which he now finds himself is precisely the opposite.

The rules forbidding ministers, including prime ministers, from being flown on a private plane except in certain specific circumstances are clear – even clearer, arguably, than those governing taxpayer-subsidized moving expenses – and it appears that Trudeau did not follow them.

What’s more, as yet, he has failed entirely to address that fundamental contradiction between his actions and the conflict of interest law of the land.

Instead, he seems content to simply repeat, through a progressively more forced smile, that it was “a family vacation,” which he insists he’ll be happy to explain to the ethics commissioner.

As of Monday, it seems he may get that opportunity, and could well end up doing so in a far more formal and politically consequential context than might otherwise have been the case.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren CalabresePrime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a town hall in Halifax on Monday, Jan. 16, 2017.

In retrospect – which, in this case, only has to extend back to the start of the new year – Trudeau should have followed the example set by his senior staffers, and gone from zero to full transparency as soon as it became clear that his off-the-radar holiday by the sea was about to hit the headlines. His first step should have been to release an exhaustive, if after-the-fact, itinerary, as well as the guest list and the details of who paid for what.

The instant that it became evident that he had breached the ban on private travel, which would have happened pretty much the instant after the initial reveal, he could have broken land speed records in convening a press conference to apologize to the ethics commissioner, his fellow parliamentarians and Canadians at large for such an egregious oversight.

He could have capped off his mea culpa-ing by offering to pick up the tab for himself, his family and his guests — with interest, even — before heading out on his town hall tour, which would no longer be quite so easily characterized as a cynical attempt to retake control of the news cycle.

That might not have been enough to entirely quash the complaints coming from the opposition benches – and Dawson may well have decided to look into the file anyway, if only as an excuse to come out with her now perennially ignored recommendations to MPs to tighten up the rules on hospitality and gifts.

But Trudeau, at least, would be able to stop pretending he hadn’t done anything wrong. He could even highlight his candour as an example of how he differs from the previous occupant of the office.

Instead, he’s providing the first evidence we’ve seen that he may be prone to the same stubborn refusal to change course that ultimately opened up that vacancy in Langevin.

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3 hours ago, boestar said:

So 70% of the eligible voters don't give a rats a$$.  Not the issue.  Of the 30% that got off their a$$ to vote the Majority spoke.  Using that as an argument doesn't hold up.  you don't vote then you don't have a say one way or the other.  I wouldn't even let someone who didn't in the federal election vote in a referendum because they obviously don't care.

Totally agree Boestar, but that does not make them any less Canadians than you or I. They broke no laws. Canadians will just have to suck it up for the next while.

My post was in relation to Deicers claim that " the people spoke" when in actual fact only a few minority demographics piled on the bandwagon. Mainly Millenials, low info first time voters and the Muslim communities who were promised the world.

Edited by Jaydee

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4 hours ago, Jaydee said:

 

My post was in relation to Deicers claim that " the people spoke" when in actual fact only a few minority demographics piled on the bandwagon. Mainly Millenials, low info first time voters and the Muslim communities who were promised the world.

It is still the people speaking, every eligible voter had the opportunity to show up.  By your logic, if only a "few minority demographics" voted, then shouldn't they have been outvoted by the majority?

 

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Arrogrant / misquided? Perhaps but will he now insist on only answering questions in English in those Provinces where English the language of the day?  I would bet not.

Justin Trudeau speaks only French at Sherbrooke town hall, despite English questions

Audience members asked about access to services in English, economic ties to U.S., upcoming pot legislation

By Elysha Enos, CBC News Posted: Jan 17, 2017 6:23 PM ET Last Updated: Jan 18, 2017 7:28 AM ET

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau answered questions ranging from local concerns about public transit to tabling new federal pot legislation at Tuesday night's town hall in Sherbrooke, Que., and he answered them all in French — because, he said, "we're in Quebec."

A woman asked in English what would be done to help Anglo-Quebecers seeking mental health services when those services are only available in French.

"Thank you for your use of both official languages," Trudeau replied in French. 

"But we're in a French province so I will answer in French," he answered, as the woman grew visibly annoyed. 

"All people who speak one of the two official languages should feel comfortable across the country," he said, in French, while highlighting the federal government's investment in health.

Not everyone fazed

Trudeau spoke exclusively in French, despite a half dozen English questions. 

Some in the crowd seemed surprised by the prime minister's decision. 

But recent Afghan immigrant Abdullah Hakiemie was too excited to meet his hero to be fazed by a French answer.

"He supports every human being on this planet, and I'm very happy to be a Canadian and to support Mr. Trudeau, and I will support him in every possible way," said Hakiemie.

'We're all so diverse'

Later, a woman wearing a hijab read from notes, in broken English, asking on behalf of all Canadian Muslims if Trudeau would consider giving them a public holiday for Eid al-Fitr, the holiday marking the end of the Islamic holy month of fasting, Ramadan. 

He answered in French that Canadians' differences are their strength and that embracing those differences enriches our country — whether they be historic differences between the French and English, or more recently with refugees being welcomed into Canada.

"Here in Canada, it's hard to call a certain group 'other,' because we are all so diverse," he said.

He did not comment on adding a national holiday to the calendar.

A woman asked Prime Minister Justin Trudeau if he would make the Muslim holy day of Eid al-Fitr a holiday. (CBC)

Pot legislation

Meanwhile, Guillaume Gagnon, who works in marijuana research and lobbying, asked for details about the tabling of new marijuana legislation due in the spring.

Trudeau said he aims to introduce new law which would make it harder for youth to get access to marijuana.

"It's easier for a 16-year-old to buy a joint than a beer," he said. "Is there a black market for beer in Quebec? No."

He said the legislation would aim to eliminate the black market and criminal elements from the buying and selling of marijuana. 

"Be patient. Changes are coming," he told the crowd of roughly 1,000 people.

Most of the attendees who asked questions came from Sherbrooke and its surrounding cities, but some came from as far as Lac-Mégantic, about 100 kilometres east.

Business with Trump administration

There was concern from members of the audience over how Canada's economic relationship with the U.S. would be affected by the incoming Trump administration.

President-elect Donald Trump promised voters he would bring jobs back to the U.S., with talk of increased border tariffs on imported goods — stoking fears of damage to Canada's import and export markets.

Trudeau stressed that his government would work with the incoming administration to protect the working class on both sides of the border. 

"Our economies are thoroughly integrated. Many industries in the U.S. benefit from strong trade ties with Canada." 

 

With regard to preserving Canada's supply-management dairy industry which was recently targeted by U.S. dairy groups, Trudeau said he would strongly defend Canadian farmers and Canadian economic interests.

He highlighted the investment of $350 million into Canada's dairy sector after signing the Canada-EU trade deal, which created extra competition from foreign cheese imports. 

Tour continues

Trudeau is taking the pulse of Canadians in a series of town hall meetings across the country, opting to skip the World Economic Forum's annual global political and business conference in Davos, Switzerland, an event he attended last year.

Sherbrooke was the first Quebec stop on the tour, which started last Thursday in eastern Ontario. 

Earlier Tuesday in New Brunswick, Trudeau fielded questions on a whole range of issues, including the troubled Phoenix payroll system, marijuana policy, protection of the environment, job creation — and what Trudeau's daughter wants to be when she grows up.

"She is an eight-year-old princess or rock 'n' roll star," he said. "I impress on my daughter she can be whatever she wants. I also impress upon her brothers she can be whatever she wants."

Trudeau will be at Bishop's University in the province's Eastern Townships on Wednesday morning, followed by a stop in Granby, Que., at 11:40 a.m.

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"Thank you for your use of both official languages," Trudeau replied in French. 

"But we're in a French province so I will answer in French," he answered, as the woman grew visibly annoyed. 

Interesting that Trudeau would put himself in that box. I can only hope somebody in the remaining stop will throw that back at him and say you're in an English province, no French please.

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21 minutes ago, st27 said:

"Thank you for your use of both official languages," Trudeau replied in French. 

"But we're in a French province so I will answer in French," he answered, as the woman grew visibly annoyed. 

Interesting that Trudeau would put himself in that box. I can only hope somebody in the remaining stop will throw that back at him and say you're in an English province, no French please.

Seems that he thinks he is free to do whatever he wants despite rules and traditions:

The tradition on Parliament Hill or in press conferences is that bilingual politicians, like Trudeau, will answer a question in the language used by the MP or a journalist who asked the question.

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They are now free of debt, Sadly the rest of us in Canada are not and the Liberals continue to add to our burden!

The federal Liberals say they’re debt-free, 14 months after the election

By Staff The Canadian Press
 

The federal Liberal party says it’s debt-free, roughly 14 months after sweeping to power in 2015, thanks largely to new members who signed on as supporters during an aggressive fundraising campaign.

In a letter to the party’s national board, party president Anna Gainey says the Liberals paid off the remaining $1.9 million it still owed from the election campaign that put Justin Trudeau in the prime minister’s chair.

READ MORE: Tories call for investigation into Liberal cash-for-access fundraisers

The letter, sent to board members late today, says the debt was paid off as of last month, and also notes that the party has enlisted an additional 50,000 members since opting in May to waive membership fees.

The Liberals spent a little more than $40 million during the campaign, Liberal national director Jeremy Broadhurst estimated shortly after it was over.

Liberals continue to be attacked over doing business at fundraisers

Since then, the party has been emailing supporters and potential donors at every turn, encouraging them to out-donate the Conservatives, who had shown they were adept at garnering grassroots support.

Gainey says the fundraising paid off, with the Liberals surpassing the Tories with individual donations from 35,000 people through six consecutive quarters, averaging $43.26 each.

 

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a town hall in Sherbrooke, Que. on Tuesday, January 17, 2017.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

“Our strong grassroots fundraising efforts, the elimination of our campaign debt in 2016, and the 50,000 Canadians who have joined us as new registered Liberals are all important milestones that ensure we are starting off 2017 as a fast-growing and ever more inclusive political movement,” she writes.

Gainey attributed the sharp increase in party memberships to a decision taken at the Liberal biennial convention in Winnipeg to eliminate fees.

READ MORE: Liberal fundraisers being investigated by lobbying watchdog

The Conservatives revealed last May that they spent $42 million during the 2015 campaign, but had already paid off a $28-million loan by then, using a combination of tax and Elections Canada rebates and party fundraising.

Elections Canada had capped spending by the major national parties for the 11-week campaign at just under $55 million each.

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Just another case of "do as I say, not as I do"

PM's use of jet for family vacation emitted as much C02 as average Canadian per year

Challenger jet

Challenger jet


Published Friday, January 20, 2017 5:48PM EST

The use of a military jet for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s two-week family vacation on the Aga Khan’s private island pumped about as much carbon dioxide into the atmosphere as the average emitted per capita in Canada each year.

Trudeau’s use of the Challenger to fly his family and a nanny from Ottawa to Nassau, Bahamas over the New Year holiday and back consumed about 9,100 litres of jet fuel, according to the Department of National Defence.

Christopher Surgenor, who runs the environmental aviation website GreenAir, calculated that the trip would have therefore created about 23.3 tonnes of C02.

 

James Tansey, a University of British Columbia sustainability professor and co-founder of Offsetters.ca, estimated that it would have used about 19.9 tonnes.

Those amounts are approximately equivalent to the average emitted per Canadian in 2014, which was pegged at the equivalent to 20.6 tonnes of C02, according to Environment and Climate Change Canada. That per capita figure includes industrial emissions, of which the oil and gas sector was the number one contributor.

It’s also about seven times as much C02 as the International Civil Aviation Organization’s emissions calculator shows six economy tickets on a flight from Ottawa to Nassau connecting in Toronto would burn: 2.94 tonnes (0.49 tonnes each). The Challenger flights had six passengers on board.

Surgenor notes that “Trudeau was a force for good in securing the global Paris climate change agreement.” But the prime minister has also faced mounting criticism from environmentalists over his support for expanding pipeline capacity from the Alberta oil sands. Just last week, Actress Jane Fonda called him a "disappointment" and warned against being “fooled by good-looking Liberals.”

NDP MP Dan Blaikie said that the prime minister “could buy offsets for his personal flight here, but he wouldn't need to, in this case, if he only took a moment to think about whether or not he should be accepting this gift of an exclusive vacation on a private island.”

Trudeau has been accused by both the Conservatives and NDP of breaching the Conflict of Interest Act when he accepted a private helicopter ride for the final leg of his trip to the Aga Khan’s island. Ethics commissioner Mary Dawson is looking into the use of the helicopter.

The Aga Khan -- an honourary Canadian and spiritual leader of the world’s Ismali Muslims -- has an eponymous foundation that receives millions in federal government funding. The prime minister has said that he’s known the Aga Khan his whole life and considers him a friend.

The Prime Minister’s Office did not respond to requests for comment about whether the carbon emitted for his vacation was justified or whether Trudeau purchased any offsets in connection with the trip.

Trudeau previously told CTV News that he reimbursed taxpayers for the equivalent of what it would have cost for flights to the Bahamas on a commercial jet.

It has long been standard practice for vacationing prime ministers to fly on a military jet with a crew on standby so that they can quickly return to Ottawa if required.

Tansey suggests the emissions could be offset in B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest for a cost of about $497.

David Suzuki Foundation Climate Change & Energy Policy Analyst Steve Kux said that although the foundation purchases offsets and encourages doing so, “the real issue is making air travel as efficient as possible.”

“By investing in clean technology, governments at all levels can help spur innovation that could ultimately reduce carbon emissions associated with air travel,” Kux said. “The first step is improving the fuel efficiency of current aircraft and the ultimate goal should be to transition the industry off fossil fuels entirely.”

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2 hours ago, Malcolm said:

Tansey suggests the emissions could be offset in B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest for a cost of about $497.

So how does buying offset credits make the environment better?

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18 hours ago, Kip Powick said:

Gimme a break !!........... This is news ???

Talk about nit-picking !  ohthedrama.gif

So let's put Trudeau and family on a commercial aircraft and while on vacation he has to get back to OW immediately....Oh, hey.... we'll scramble a Challenger to go and pick him up..... now we have carbon from the Challenger as well as his commercial flight to calculate.

 

Flame away  soapbox.gif                 

I can't imagine any circumstance where he would have to get back to OW immediately, whatever the situation was would probably be solved much better with him out of the country.

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Kip: nit picking, perhaps but the man is talking the talk but not walking the walk when it comes to carbon emissions.  We could also include the unnecessary emissions from his current road trip (and those of the entourage travelling with him). He could have instead used video conferencing but that of course would not have been good for "selfies". :D

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4 hours ago, mo32a said:

I can't imagine any circumstance where he would have to get back to OW immediately,

and since it would take a couple of hours to get everything together and then the helicopter ride to Nassau the total savings in time would be under an hour.

Trudeau jr. is not that important.

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Actually, I'll bet Trudeau is enjoying these last few days...The fuss over Trump has taken the heat off him for a while!

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On 1/20/2017 at 8:59 PM, Malcolm said:

Just another case of "do as I say, not as I do"

PM's use of jet for family vacation emitted as much C02 as average Canadian per year

Challenger jet

Challenger jet


Published Friday, January 20, 2017 5:48PM EST

The use of a military jet for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s two-week family vacation on the Aga Khan’s private island pumped about as much carbon dioxide into the atmosphere as the average emitted per capita in Canada each year.

Trudeau’s use of the Challenger to fly his family and a nanny from Ottawa to Nassau, Bahamas over the New Year holiday and back consumed about 9,100 litres of jet fuel, according to the Department of National Defence.

Christopher Surgenor, who runs the environmental aviation website GreenAir, calculated that the trip would have therefore created about 23.3 tonnes of C02.

 

James Tansey, a University of British Columbia sustainability professor and co-founder of Offsetters.ca, estimated that it would have used about 19.9 tonnes.

Those amounts are approximately equivalent to the average emitted per Canadian in 2014, which was pegged at the equivalent to 20.6 tonnes of C02, according to Environment and Climate Change Canada. That per capita figure includes industrial emissions, of which the oil and gas sector was the number one contributor.

It’s also about seven times as much C02 as the International Civil Aviation Organization’s emissions calculator shows six economy tickets on a flight from Ottawa to Nassau connecting in Toronto would burn: 2.94 tonnes (0.49 tonnes each). The Challenger flights had six passengers on board.

Surgenor notes that “Trudeau was a force for good in securing the global Paris climate change agreement.” But the prime minister has also faced mounting criticism from environmentalists over his support for expanding pipeline capacity from the Alberta oil sands. Just last week, Actress Jane Fonda called him a "disappointment" and warned against being “fooled by good-looking Liberals.”

NDP MP Dan Blaikie said that the prime minister “could buy offsets for his personal flight here, but he wouldn't need to, in this case, if he only took a moment to think about whether or not he should be accepting this gift of an exclusive vacation on a private island.”

Trudeau has been accused by both the Conservatives and NDP of breaching the Conflict of Interest Act when he accepted a private helicopter ride for the final leg of his trip to the Aga Khan’s island. Ethics commissioner Mary Dawson is looking into the use of the helicopter.

The Aga Khan -- an honourary Canadian and spiritual leader of the world’s Ismali Muslims -- has an eponymous foundation that receives millions in federal government funding. The prime minister has said that he’s known the Aga Khan his whole life and considers him a friend.

The Prime Minister’s Office did not respond to requests for comment about whether the carbon emitted for his vacation was justified or whether Trudeau purchased any offsets in connection with the trip.

Trudeau previously told CTV News that he reimbursed taxpayers for the equivalent of what it would have cost for flights to the Bahamas on a commercial jet.

It has long been standard practice for vacationing prime ministers to fly on a military jet with a crew on standby so that they can quickly return to Ottawa if required.

Tansey suggests the emissions could be offset in B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest for a cost of about $497.

David Suzuki Foundation Climate Change & Energy Policy Analyst Steve Kux said that although the foundation purchases offsets and encourages doing so, “the real issue is making air travel as efficient as possible.”

“By investing in clean technology, governments at all levels can help spur innovation that could ultimately reduce carbon emissions associated with air travel,” Kux said. “The first step is improving the fuel efficiency of current aircraft and the ultimate goal should be to transition the industry off fossil fuels entirely.”

So it produced more CO2 than the gross takeoff weight of the aircraft?  Conservation of mass makes that a physical impossibility

 

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It's the voodoo math of the climate change types...wait til you get into the nitty gritty of cap and trade...which industries produce what ghg's an how much. But then again, you can still pollute and along as you pay for it, which will vary depending on how much somebody is willing to pay for it at the auction of the day. The beauracracy will be substantial.

makes no sense and and hasn't worked in other jurisdictions. But the gov't of Ontario is doing it anyway.

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