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deicer

Westjet Founder Ordering A220's

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So are we now entering the era of the disposable airline? One model getting old and tired? Bankrupt it, shut it down, and start up a new one. Shiny new planes, fancy new marketing message, and eager, dedicated professional staff. What a colossal waste of money, time and resources. 

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Disposable Airlines??? How so? JetBlue is doing just fine.

Neeleman specializes in start ups just like many other entrepreneurs. ie software companies, engineering, etc.

That's why many of the sales have non-compete clauses included. These guys are usually quite good at what they do, At least some are. Some don't even specialize in one industry. They are often angel investors that help small business owners transition from someone's basement to a larger market.

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Neelman cofounded Morris Air which was bought and merged into SouthWest, provided startup advice to WestJet, started JetBlue, as was already mentioned, and started up Azul in Brazil,  and is co-owner in the turn around at 73 year old TAP Air Portugal.  All of these are successful, and this latest venture, if you go by his track record should be as well.

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"Neeleman is exploring the possible creation of a new low-cost carrier in the U.S., trade publications Airline Weekly and Airfinance Journal reported last month."

Another low-cost airline. Really... why? Does this not just perpetuate the problem of underfunded, short-sighted shoestring operations relying on low cost employees, low-cost maintenance, Low cost everything? Does <<you-get-what-you-pay-for>> still mean anything?

How is another Low-cost airline going to improve the degradation of service, comfort, reliability and safety? Why can't people like Neelman focus on making existing carriers better? From an industry perspective our energies should be on improvement of safety, service and cost for the companies who are carrying passengers now.

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Why work on fixing other people's messes if you don''t like doing that?

I'm a plumber by trade. I choose to do only new installs. I don't want to clean up other people's **bleep**. If we only fixed existing problems we'd still be using an "improved" telegraph vs a smartphone.

He's not "Mike the White" so what's the problem? 

Do Jet Blue or WJ have safety issues that are different than existing carriers?  Neeleman uses new aircraft not junk so it's likely safer than riding in an MD80, 737-500 series, or an older NG, etc. AC's 320's didn't even have a GPS. I used my foreflight acct on my ipad-cellular version for situational awareness.

You provide what the customer wants not create a product that no wants or wants but isn't willing to pay for. ie A380, 318, 737-600, etc 

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"I used my foreflight acct on my ipad-cellular version for situational awareness."

Right out of AC's SOP Manual no doubt?

 

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10 hours ago, DEFCON said:

"I used my foreflight acct on my ipad-cellular version for situational awareness."

Right out of AC's SOP Manual no doubt?

 

Yup you got me there. The same SOP and training program that provided little to no guidance on factoring in wind, cold temps, etc when using FPA in the Halifax hard landing. Read the report.......  

Sorry but I shouldn’t have use work around tools that a Navajo pilot doesn’t need because the airplane has had IFR gps sine 1996.

I’m pretty sure you were perfect and followed all the new “no smoking” rules in the  Convair days. ?

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Quote

FARNBOROUGH: Neeleman's start-up to partner Azul and TAP

  • 17 July, 2018
  • SOURCE: Flight Dashboard
  • BY: Ghim-Lay Yeo
  • Farnborough

David Neeleman's planned US start-up will eventually partner with Brazil's Azul and TAP Air Portugal for transatlantic flying, with the Airbus A220-300's range central to that long-term strategy.

"We can fly across the North Atlantic, down into the Caribbean and into Brazil," says Neeleman in reference to the commitment for 60 A220-300s bound for the unnamed US start-up planned by Neeleman, deliveries of which will begin in 2021.

Reports had previously surfaced suggesting that the airline would be called Moxy, but Neeleman says this was merely a working project name. Moxy is already being used by a hotel chain under the Marriott group, says Neeleman. "They got a bit upset about that," he says.

Neeleman says all 60 A220s will come from Airbus's planned A220 assembly facility in Mobile, Alabama. With three years to go before deliveries begin, he expresses confidence that a strong leadership team will be built. The start-up will focus on serving thinner routes including those to secondary cities.

He dismisses reports that he was searching for investors to provide capital for the start-up, saying: "We have the money." He declines to name his fellow investors or the amount of capital involved, saying only: "It is as much as you will need."

Despite working with a launch date in 2021, Neeleman is unconcerned about how the US airline landscape might change, such as the potential impact from an unforeseen economic downturn. "I've been through a lot of those," he says.

The US start-up will be the latest in a long series of airlines that Neeleman has helped create, including Azul, JetBlue Airways, WestJet and Morris Air. He said he would probably have embarked on a new US start-up "sooner" if he had not been occupied with Azul and his investment in TAP through the Atlantic Gateway consortium. Neeleman also holds a 32% stake in French carrier Aigle Azur.

TAP and Azul are in the midst of formulating a joint venture that will allow the airlines to work together across the Atlantic. Azul chief executive John Rodgerson tells FlightGlobal that the two airlines are still in negotiations and hope to conclude a deal by year-end.

 

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Even though it has come at a great cost of changing its ownership and name, it’s nice to see that this airplane is finally getting the attention it deserves and hopefully will be used extensively at urban airports where its strengths lie. 

 

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8 minutes ago, MD2 said:

Even though it has come at a great cost of changing its ownership and name, it’s nice to see that this airplane is finally getting the attention it deserves and hopefully will be used extensively at urban airports where its strengths lie. 

 

I agree but evidently the order is not firm, at least according to this article:

FARNBOROUGH: Airbus yet to count A220s as firm

  • 19 July, 2018
  • SOURCE: Flight Dashboard
  • BY: David Kaminski-Morrow
  • Farnborough

Airbus secured firm orders for 93 aircraft during the Farnborough air show, taking its overall gross order total for the year so far to 354.

This indicates that the airframer has yet to firm any commitments to the new A220, following its acquisition of the Bombardier CSeries programme.

Airbus had secured gross orders for 177 single-aisle and 84 long-haul aircraft over the first half, a total of 261.

 

While orders for 52 aircraft mentioned at Farnborough had already been included in this first-half total, Airbus disclosed firm orders for another 93 during the show – comprising 51 A320-family, 34 A330 and eight A350 jets – taking its declared firm orders this year to 354.

This total notably omits the 60 A220s for JetBlue Airways unveiled in early July, just as Airbus took over and rebranded the CSeries programme.

The airframer had supplemented these 60 pre-show A220s for JetBlue with another 60, during Farnborough, for an unnamed US start-up carrier.

But chief commercial officer Eric Schulz, during a wrap-up briefing at the show, appeared to confirm that none of the A220s was yet in the backlog, by listing all 120 aircraft as commitments rather than firm orders.

The airframer says that, along with 93 firm orders, it took commitments for 338 aircraft at the show, in the form of memoranda of understanding.

Along with the 60 A220s for the start-up these 338 commitments included 253 A320-family jets, eight A330s and 17 A350s.

If all of the commitments are converted to firm orders, they will take Airbus’s gross order total to 752 aircraft.

Get all the coverage from the Farnborough air show on our dedicated event page

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