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Airbus now Lists C Series

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Airbus officially lists CSeries in product line-up

  • 02 July, 2018
  • SOURCE: Flight Dashboard
  • London

Airbus has formally added the Bombardier CSeries to its portfolio of commercial aircraft, for now retaining the CS100 and CS300 identities.

The European airframer is listing the 130- to 140-seat CS300 as having a range of 3,300nm (6,112km) while the CS100, typically seating 120, has a range of 3,100nm.

Its online commercial aircraft product pages have been updated to include detailed technical information for the CSeries although the accompanying illustrations still show the jets in Bombardier colours.

The airframer has yet to disclose whether it will adopt a new brand or designation for the CS100 and CS300.

Airbus is intending to hold a pre-Farnborough briefing, centred on its aircraft family, at its Toulouse headquarters on 10 July.

Bombardier, in turn, has redirected its CSeries online pages to Airbus and its own commercial aircraft site features only the CRJ family and Q400 turboprop.

Airbus closed its transaction to acquire just over 50% of the CSeries Aircraft Limited Partnership on 1 July.

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It's the Avro Arrow all over again.  I have mixed feelings - glad to see the aircraft design survive and (hopefully) prosper but disappointed that we (as a country) couldn't make a go of it ourselves.  And, yes, I do know the forces at play are much bigger than one small company in one small country.

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4 hours ago, seeker said:

It's the Avro Arrow all over again.  I have mixed feelings - glad to see the aircraft design survive and (hopefully) prosper but disappointed that we (as a country) couldn't make a go of it ourselves.  And, yes, I do know the forces at play are much bigger than one small company in one small country.

Renaming a plane that is certified, delivered and operating is stupid but this is a much better industrial outcome than precarious profitability for Bombardier. Mirabel could be unrecognizable a decade from now. Quebec must be positively drooling at the prospect of snapping up work from the UK if Airbus flips the board and the bird over Brexit.

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JetBlue orders 60+60 of the CS300

 

http://blueir.investproductions.com/investor-relations/press-releases/2018/07-10-2018-211604881

 

JetBlue Selects Airbus A220-300 as Key Component of Its Next Generation Fleet

Jul 10, 2018
 

A220-300, formerly the Bombardier CS300, provides superior value and a powerful combination of aircraft economics, range capabilities and customer experience

Airline to retire Embraer 190 fleet beginning in 2020

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- JetBlue (NASDAQ:JBLU) today announced it has ordered 60 Airbus A220-300 aircraft – previously called the Bombardier CS300 – for delivery beginning in 2020, with the option for 60 additional aircraft beginning in 2025. The aircraft will be powered by Pratt & Whitney Geared Turbofan (GTF) PW1500G engines. The order follows JetBlue’s intensive review aimed at ensuring the best financial performance of the airline’s fleet while providing maximum flexibility to execute its network strategy and enhancing its industry-leading customer experience.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180710006015/en/

JetBlue A220-300 (Photo: Business Wire)

JetBlue A220-300 (Photo: Business Wire) 

As part of the agreement, JetBlue has also reshaped its Airbus orderbook, including converting its order for 25 A320neos to the A321neo and adjusting the delivery schedule.

“We are evolving our fleet for the future of JetBlue, and the A220-300’s impressive range and economics offer us flexibility and support our key financial and operating priorities,” said Robin Hayes, chief executive officer, JetBlue. “As we approach our 20th anniversary, the A220, combined with our A321 and restyled A320 fleet, will help ensure we deliver the best onboard experience to customers and meet our long-term financial targets as we continue disciplined growth into the future.”

“JetBlue’s selection of the A220 aircraft as a complement to its growing A320 Family fleet is a tremendous endorsement – both of the A220 itself and of the way these two aircraft can work together to provide airline network flexibility and a great customer experience,” said Eric Schulz, chief commercial officer for Airbus. “JetBlue will be able to leverage the unbeatable efficiency of both the A321neo and the A220-300, as well as taking advantage of the roomiest and most customer-pleasing cabins of any aircraft in their size categories.”

“We’re honored by JetBlue’s confidence in selecting the A220-300 aircraft which adds to their existing order of the A320neo family of aircraft both powered by the Pratt & Whitney GTF engine,” said Chris Calio, president of commercial engines at Pratt & Whitney. “We’ve been powering JetBlue with our V2500® engines since they started operations in 2000. We now look forward to also supporting JetBlue across their two new fuel-efficient, next-generation aircraft platforms.”

State-of-the-Art Technology & Enhanced Customer Experience

The A220-300’s spacious and comfortable cabin makes it the perfect fit for JetBlue, which has consistently led U.S.airlines in the onboard experience. The A220’s cabin design offers customers the best inflight experience with wider seats, spacious overhead bins and extra-large windows that offer a great view from the sky and on the ground.

The aircraft’s advanced aerodynamics combined with a specially designed Pratt & Whitney engine help the aircraft deliver approximately 40 percent lower fuel burn per seat than JetBlue’s current E190 fleet, a reduced noise footprint and decreased emissions.

Thorough Analysis Determined Path to Greatest Value

JetBlue conducted a comprehensive review of multiple options for its 100-seat aircraft. In addition to its financial analysis, JetBlue invited frontline leaders and crewmembers, including technical operations, to evaluate the aircraft in person at JetBlue’s JFK hangar.

JetBlue plans to phase in the A220-300 as a replacement for JetBlue’s existing fleet of 60 Embraer E190 aircraft. The aircraft’s range and seating capacity will add flexibility to JetBlue’s network strategy as it targets growth in its focus cities, including options to schedule it for transcontinental flying. The aircraft also opens the door to new markets and routes that would have been unprofitable with JetBlue’s existing fleet.

“We expect the A220 to be an important long-term building block in our goal to deliver superior margins and create long-term shareholder value,” said Steve Priest, executive vice president and chief financial officer, JetBlue. “We are confident the A220 will perform well in every aspect, including network, cost, maintenance, or customer experience. Simply put – our crewmembers, customers and owners are going to love this aircraft.”

While the E190 has played an important role in JetBlue’s network since 2005, the airline’s fleet review determined that the A220’s economics would allow the airline to lower costs in the coming years. The A220 was designed by previous manufacturer Bombardier to seat between 130 and 160 customers, enabling financial and network advantages over the current 100-seat Embraer configuration.

Seamless Transition With Built-In Flexibility

“The diligence that went into this analysis from teams across JetBlue speaks to the aircraft’s importance for the next generation of our airline,” Priest said. “We expect a seamless transition, and we’ve worked with Airbus and Bombardier to build in maximum flexibility to the order book as market conditions shift over time.”

JetBlue plans to take delivery of the first five aircraft in 2020, the airline’s 20th year of service. Deliveries will continue through 2025. JetBlue expects it will begin to reduce flying with its existing fleet of E190 aircraft beginning in 2020. The phase out will continue gradually through approximately 2025.

Options for 60 additional aircraft begin in 2025, and JetBlue retains flexibility to convert certain aircraft to the smaller A220-100 if it chooses. Both members of the A220 Family share commonality in more than 99 percent of their replaceable parts as well as the same family of engines.

JetBlue’s A220 aircraft will be assembled in Mobile, Ala.

 

Edited by dagger
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This ain’t no Avro Arrow project. What a great aircraft designed by Canadians. The amount of detail that has gone into this aircraft is incredible and it’s paying off. 

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5 hours ago, Super 80 said:

Renaming a plane that is certified, delivered and operating is stupid...

Wasn’t the MD-80 a DC-9?

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...and the B717 an MD95

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3 hours ago, conehead said:

Wasn’t the MD-80 a DC-9?

DC-9-80 or DC-9 Super 80. The MD-87 was the first variant never officially referred to as DC-9-8_

The MD-95 was certified as the 717, I have a factory model of the MD-95 in my office.

Edited by Super 80
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If you want to get an idea of the cost savings inherent in switching from an early issue E-190 to an A220-300 (formerly CS300), JetBlue has costed it out. Should be similar for Air Canada. As reported by FlightGlobal.

 

JetBlue estimates that the A220 will lower operating costs by 29% on a per seat basis, comprising a 40% reduction in fuel costs and 22% decline in non-fuel expenses, when compared with its existing Embraer E190 fleet. On a per aircraft basis, the A220 is expected to drive incremental profit of $4-$5 million.

When the airline's transition to the A220 is complete by 2025, systemwide unit cost would benefit by a decline of 5.3% and non-fuel unit cost by over 4.5%, says Priest. Earnings per share will also improve by about 65 cents on JetBlue's current share count.

 

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The purchase has made the folks in Belfast happy also.

Airbus A220: Belfast plant boosted by airline order

By John Campbell BBC News NI Economics & Business Editor
  • 10 July 2018
  •  
 

The US airline JetBlue has ordered up to 120 Airbus A220 planes.

The wings for the A220, which was formerly known as the Bombardier CSeries, are made in Belfast.

It is the first major order for the plane since Airbus acquired a majority stake in what was the CSeries project. About 1,000 staff work at the A220 factory in Belfast.

JetBlue has ordered 60 Airbus A220-300 aircraft for delivery at the beginning of 2020. It also has an option for 60 additional aircraft beginning in 2025.

 

"We are evolving our fleet for the future of JetBlue, and the A220-300's impressive range and economics offer us flexibility and support our key financial and operating priorities," said Robin Hayes, chief executive officer of JetBlue

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Isnt the Buffalo approach something like point it at the ground and maintain 50 knots.  Flare then stop a few feet later.

 

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10 minutes ago, boestar said:

Isnt the Buffalo approach something like point it at the ground and maintain 50 knots.  Flare then stop a few feet later.

 

Key word here is “Flare”.

Edited by blues deville

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  • FARNBOROUGH: A220 gains ETOPS certification

FARNBOROUGH: A220 gains ETOPS certification

  • 16 July, 2018
  • SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com
  • BY: Michael Gubisch

Pratt & Whitney’s PW1500G geared turbofan has been cleared for extended twin-engined operations of up to 3h.

The US engine manufacturer disclosed the Federal Aviation Administration's granting of 180min ETOPS approval for the engine, which exclusively powers the Airbus A220.

P&W senior vice-president for commercial engine programmes Tom Pelland states that the engine manufacturer, Airbus, and Bombardier – which developed the aircraft, before control was passed to the European airframer earlier this month – "worked diligently to make engine ETOPS certification a reality".

 

The A220 entered service as the CSeries in 2016.

Flight Fleets Analyzer shows that a total 38 A220s in service, across operators Swiss, Air Baltic and Korean Air.

There are another 424 on order, including the 60 firm orders placed by JetBlue Airways earlier this month.

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The Airbus ‘Whisperjet,’ formerly known as Bombardier’s CSeries, is getting complaints for sounding like an orca mating call

 
‎Yesterday, ‎November ‎5, ‎2018, ‏‎9:33:00 PM | Peter Muir

The narrow-body’s twin engines emit what locals have described as a strange howling noise as it comes in to land, enraging people living on the flight path in Zurich

swiss-air.jpg?w=780&h=439Zurich Airport has received complaints on its noise hotline of unusual sounds when Swiss Air’s A220 jet passes overhead.Simon Dawson/Bloomberg
Bloomberg News –  Richard Weiss, Benjamin Katz and Corinne Gretler – 5 November 5 2018

 

 

Swiss Air greeted the arrival of its latest plane with great fanfare, dubbing the Airbus SE A220 model the “Whisperjet” and promising neighbourhoods around Zurich Airport that it would be 50 per cent quieter than older aircraft.

But that tag has come back to haunt the Deutsche Lufthansa AG unit as the narrow-body’s twin engines emit what locals have described as a strange howling noise as it comes in to land, enraging people living on the flight path.

“It’s even louder than other machines flying in,” said Klaus Stoehlker, spokesman for the Zurich-based Foundation Against Aircraft Noise. “They’ve been describing it as temporary while they make assessments, but for nine months now it hasn’t gone away.”

Zurich Airport has received complaints on its noise hotline of unusual sounds when the A220 passes overhead, a spokeswoman said, adding that it’s working with Swiss to seek a quick solution. The plane — developed by Bombardier Inc. and now part of the Airbus lineup — isn’t breaching rules and the sound, which last for a few seconds, hasn’t triggered higher fees that apply to louder jets.

Airbus and Swiss each said they are aware of the situation and in close contact with engine maker Pratt & Whitney, which is analyzing the noise — likened by some to the mating call of an orca whale — to determine its cause. The sound “occasionally occurs” during throttle movements when A220 is at low power, a Pratt spokeswoman said, adding that the jet’s total noise footprint still represents a 75 per cent improvement on older planes.

The issue, which affects A220 models seemingly at random, risks blemishing the plane’s credentials as ideal for noise-limited airports. Hubs including Frankfurt operate strict night curfews, while London City, which Swiss also serves with the plane, restricts weekend flights.

The Whisperjet name has been applied to a variety of planes over the decades, including the BAE-146 and Eastern Airlines Boeing Co. 727s, whose tail-mounted engines made the front of the cabin quiet but the rear especially noisy.

–With assistance from Frederic Tomesco.

Bloomberg.com

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