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Former Air Canada Employees Allege Harassment Culture, Intimidation


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It's amazing that someone with six months of questionable on the job experience could be promoted to a supervisory position.

From here that appointment seems more than a little short-sighted and appears to have been motivated by a perceived need to be politically correct above all else.

Oh well; it looks like natural selection intervened and saved the day.

 

PS  - AC has always had way more than its share of freeloading employees and I think it's easy to appreciate their trying to purge themselves of those people.

 

 

 

Edited by DEFCON
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53 minutes ago, DEFCON said:

It's amazing that someone with six months of questionable on the job experience could be promoted to a supervisory position.

From here that appointment seems more than a little short-sighted and appears to have been motivated by a perceived need to be politically correct above all else.

Oh well; it looks like natural selection intervened and saved the day.

 

PS  - AC has always had way more than its share of freeloading employees and I think it's easy to appreciate their trying to purge themselves of those people.

 

 

 

In the CP days, I seem to remember it being the opposite way.  Excellent candidates couldn't get an interview for a Lead position because the collective agreement had some language about interviewing the 5 most senior applicants (again, going from memory) which in my station meant that the most junior of the 5 senior people had 15 years of seniority.  I also seem to recall hearing of a big uproar in YYZ when a manager wouldn't hire from those 5 senior applicants.

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Regarding stress etc. In my 35 years in the industry I loaded aircraft, checked in passengers, did ticketing, standards and procedures, ran cargo warehouses, managed union and non union staff, worked with government officials, in my last years I reported to a VP and directly to our president on some matters,  was accountable to many others ….customers, staff , my peers, upper management, my family  etc etc etc. At times I did question my choices but they were my choices.  No regrets and def. no post retirement trauma.

But perhaps I was just lucky.  

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1 hour ago, Malcolm said:

But perhaps I was just lucky.  

It sounds like you had a varied and enjoyable career Malcolm.  I’m sure there were some very stressful times as well.  There are soldiers who go to war and come home unscathed, first responders who experience terrible things and are able to cope with it.  Other people react differently, some are not able to cope as well as others.  We’re all different.

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8 hours ago, conehead said:

Other people react differently, some are not able to cope as well as others.  We’re all different.

If you have a difficult time coping with work at the airport, maybe you should look for a different line of work?

Somewhere with a safe space perhaps?

I mean, things are so bad that you have PTSD and have been off work for the past 13 years on disability, and you are blaming the employer, your coworkers, and your own union, and you're pursuing CHRT relief - for what, to go back?

Why would you want to do that? Move on with your life. 

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14 hours ago, Malcolm said:

Regarding stress etc. In my 35 years in the industry I loaded aircraft, checked in passengers, did ticketing, standards and procedures, ran cargo warehouses, managed union and non union staff, worked with government officials, in my last years I reported to a VP and directly to our president on some matters,  was accountable to many others ….customers, staff , my peers, upper management, my family  etc etc etc. At times I did question my choices but they were my choices.  No regrets and def. no post retirement trauma.

But perhaps I was just lucky.  

No shortage of stress management in the airline biz. Sounds like you did well at whatever you were assigned Malcolm and obviously your efforts were recognized.

It’s amazing what actually has to happen hourly/daily on the ground before any flight departs on time with all passengers and baggage/cargo going to the correct destination. Many pilots spend their early days in aviation working the ramp, counter, dispatching, loading or cleaning airplanes but I think it should be a required part of all airline initial training courses to have a better appreciation and understanding of ground operations. 

At C3 we had some very dedicated and hardworking station managers in PIE and MCO. On time departures were key to the entire operation with usually two trips per a/c per aircraft. So having the morning Florida trips staying on schedule was critical. These same managers would hustle to get the flights turned around and it inspired others to do the same. Of course there were always some pilots and cabin crew who had difficulty not being completely in-charge of everything rather than being a team player for an hour on the ground. It was and still is a two way street and anytime my family flew south for a Florida vacation we were treated like royalty by these same managers who remembered and appreciated a good attitude and effort.

Edited by blues deville
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On thing I forgot to mention, after I left the union and went into Management I was always very lucky, my fellow workers (staff)  made me look good!

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