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Time To Get Rid of Your Electronics?


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ask the same question of the windows Cortana and you get 

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Because red really brings out a Dalmatian's spots.

Jaydee, I don't own any apple products to what does SIRI say?

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4 hours ago, Malcolm said:

ask the same question of the windows Cortana and you get 

Jaydee, I don't own any apple products to what does SIRI say?

More of a spoof tan anything else....

41183737-0285-459E-9169-79B73EAFED91.jpeg

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The original post regarding the "hidden commands"  This has been around for a long time.  A popular app called Shazam uses this same technology and has for years.  Originally it identified songs based on patterns in the music but was later adapted to identify specific embedded patterns in tv commercials and shows to allow a user to easily obtain more information.

The technology is not nefarious but it could be used as such if someone with malicious intent exploited it in some way.  These loopholes are already being closed.

 

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Good Morning Boestar

While I agree with the fact that the technology isn't nefarious in it's own right, you hit the nail on the head with regard to how it can be maliciously exploited.

More and more devices are being put in homes that can monitor your activity.  Remember when google bought Nest, and started putting microphones in the thermostats and the outrage over that?  Now, people are lining up to have a device that listens all the time in their homes.  

My concern is not only with what can be exploited out of that tech, but also with 'legitimate' entities listening in on what you are doing.  Maybe I'm paranoid, but it isn't a long stretch of the imagination to think that agencies are watching everything and are expanding their reach.  On one hand it can be useful for security measures, on the other hand older folks might not agree with somebody watching 24/7.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2015/04/07/dea-bulk-telephone-surveillance-operation/70808616/

What ever happened to people wanting privacy?  

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19 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

If anyone finds a way to turn off these annoying cell phone amber alerts in Canada, please post.

 

 

Easy, just switch back to your older cell phone.

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1 hour ago, Malcolm said:

Easy, just switch back to your older cell phone.

Actually....in Canada that appears to be only option. Big Brother forces it to your phone . No opting out. Another "we know what's best for you whether you like it or not "

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1 hour ago, boestar said:

just hope its not your kid missing one day.  Suck it up and silence the alarm.  You get them what twice a year?

 

You missed the point entirely.

It's got nothing to do with the actual warning. That's actually a very good thing. It's the being FORCED to have it by the government. Whether I receive it or not should be MY CHOICE, determined by MY reasoning and not some Bureaucrats.

I was in a hospital environment yesterday and the entire place suddenly became one big warning zone as phones went off all over the place  Let's hope phones are no longer allowed in operating rooms. How about that 80 year old driving down the 401? The last thing they need is a distraction they don't know why it's happening. The examples could be endless. The ONLY option one has is to turn the phone off which defeats the purpose of having one in the first place. In the US cell phones have the option to turn off alerts. I guess Canadians aren't considered as smart, we need to be forced.

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Jaydee, there is a very simple way of dealing with unwanted alerts when one does not want to be disturbed. Turn off your ringer or indeed your "smart phone" and enjoy your cone of peace and quiet until you make the decision to turn it back on.  I have a smartphone but it is only on when I feel the need to allow someone or something to gain my attention.

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I have since found some settings on my iPhone under  “Privacy” > Location Services > System services > Emergency SOS & Location based alerts that I have disabled. Time will tell if that works

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7 hours ago, boestar said:

just hope its not your kid missing one day.  Suck it up and silence the alarm.  You get them what twice a year?

 

While I agree with the basic premise, I’m a visitor to Ontario and yesterday alone I got six alarms for an amber alert in YQT. In fairness to all, the option to opt out should be there for those who choose it. Negative options, like the move to assume agreement to organ donation in the absence of a negative declaration seems a bit off putting to me.

BTW, The Superstore charges 5 cents a bag here, guess where I don't shop. Best thing they ever could have done for Sobey's...love it!

 

 

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4 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

While I agree with the basic premise, I’m a visitor to Ontario and yesterday alone I got six alarms for an amber alert in YQT. In fairness to all, the option to opt out should be there for those who choose it. Negative options, like the move to assume agreement to organ donation in the absence of a negative declaration seems a bit off putting to me.

BTW, The Superstore charges 5 cents a bag here, guess where I don't shop. Best thing they ever could have done for Sobey's...love it!

 

 

Charging for plastic bags has the same effect on climate change as our current carbon taxes..... in other words none.

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Re smart phone and alert system.  So you are in your car and get an alert, you pull over to see what it is and a cop views you using your phone in violation of current distracted driving laws,... so I guess you get a ticket and the points.

I imagine that our PM will blame the system faults on the previous Conservative Government as they continue to do with the Phoenix pay system.

Following is a good article on how the new system could have been better.

ay 20, 2018 11:47 am

Updated: May 20, 2018 11:52 am

Technology exists to fix design flaws of Canada’s ‘Alert Ready’ system: expert

By Nicole Thompson The Canadian Press

Mixed results in Kingston during National Public Alert system testing.

 

TORONTO – The technology exists to fix some of the design flaws in Canada’s mobile emergency alert system that was tested last week for an Amber Alert issued in Ontario, some experts say.

 

The “Alert Ready” program – which sounds an alarm on LTE-connected smart phones during a crisis – could be more effective at alerting people to emergencies, they said.

“The approach we’re taking with mobile devices is the same we had in 1940, when we had sirens installed on buildings,” said Cosmin Munteanu, a professor of computer science and information at the University of Toronto.

“There’s no nuance involved.”

He said that because of smart phone technology, designers had the opportunity to cater details of the alarm – its sound, the colour that pops up on the screen – to the emergency it’s alerting people to.

 

Munteanu said that with the system as it is now, people who hear the blaring alarm associated with these emergency alerts for a missing child but don’t have an opportunity to read the text for some reason might believe they’re in imminent danger.

And in fact, several police forces in Ontario received complaints from members of the public last week when an alarm sounded on cell phones to announce an Amber Alert triggered by the disappearance of a boy outside of Thunder Bay, Ont.

Half an hour later, the sound rang out again. This time, the text of the alert was displayed in French. It would go off two more times – once in each official language – that day to announce the child was found safe.

Officers in two Ontario cities – Kingston and Guelph – tweeted that it was not appropriate to call 911 about the matter.

 

The incident left some questioning the inclusion of Amber Alerts in the mobile emergency system, which has no opt-out option in Canada, as mandated by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission.

“If somebody in Toronto is alerted to an abducted child or a missing child in Thunder Bay, they can’t help,” said John Rainford, director of The Warning Project, founded by a group of experts who help organizations communicate during emergencies.

“But then also, that person in Toronto is like, ‘Okay, next time my phone rings in this weird sound, I don’t care,”‘ he said. “And I want them to care.”

A similar system exists in the United States, but people can choose not to receive notifications about Amber Alerts or local emergencies by modifying settings on their cell phones. They cannot, however, opt out of receiving directives from the White House.

 

It becomes a balancing act for authorities, he said.

“You need to strike this careful balance between alerting people to lots of problems – which is a good thing because then they’re aware that if that weird sound comes over my smart phone, that means something weird’s happening – and doing it too often.”

But Rainford said it’s a good thing that these kinks are happening now, before the masses need to be informed of a crisis on a larger scale.

“That’s actually part of the system,” he said. “You want to do that when (more) lives are not at stake.”

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Re smart phone and alert system.  So you are in your car and get an alert, you pull over to see what it is and a cop views you using your phone in violation of current distracted driving laws,... so I guess you get a ticket and the points.

Emphasis added by me.

 

At this point you would not be in contravention of the current law since you pulled over to look at your phone.

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1 hour ago, boestar said:

Emphasis added by me.

 

At this point you would not be in contravention of the current law since you pulled over to look at your phone.

your are right but

When can I legally pull over to answer a text or phone call?

JASON TCHIR
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published March 11, 2014Updated May 12, 2018

For Ontario's distracted driving law, what exactly constitutes legal parking? Does the engine have to be turned off? Do the keys have to be removed from the ignition? When can you legally use your phone? -- Philip, ON

Put simply, you can't touch a hand-held phone when you're driving unless you're pushing the hands-free button or calling 911, says Ontario's MTO.

"Ontario's law makes it illegal for drivers to talk, text, type, dial or email using hand-held cell phones and other hand-held communications and entertainment devices," the MTO says in an email statement. "The law also prohibits drivers from viewing display screens while driving, such as laptops or DVD players, that are unrelated to the driving task."

On March 18, 2014 the fine for breaking that law will rise from $155 to $280.

The MTO says drivers can touch a device to turn on or off the hands-free function, but otherwise they can't physically touch the device while driving. That includes giving instructions to the GPS and playing MP3s/

 

If you're parked or safely pulled over and not impeding traffic, then you're not driving. You can use the device from behind the wheel without getting charged.

There is a hitch. You have to follow other traffic laws. If it says No Parking, you can't park there. You have to be lawfully, or legally, parked. That means you can only park where parking is allowed. If there's a No Parking sign, then it's not lawful parking.

"You have to be safely in park to use a device, but the engine doesn't have to be off and the keys don't have to be out of the ignition," says Ontario Provincial Police Sgt. Pierre Chamberland.

If you're pulling over, you can't pull over where it's not allowed. For example, pulling over is banned on 400-series roads unless it's an emergency.

"If the situation is not an emergency, drivers are advised to exit the freeway at an interchange or pull into the nearest service centre," the MTO says.

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Why would anyone be in such a hurry to need to pull over to see an alert like that?  of course you would pull over in a safe spot where legally permissible.  that's just common se.... Oh wait...

 

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Amazon's Alexa Records Private Conversation, Sends To Random Contact

 

A family in Portland, Oregon, claims that their Alexa, a voice-controlled smart speaker by Amazon, eavesdropped on their conversation and then shared it. They called the company to investigate the issue and vowed never to use the device again.

"My husband and I would joke and say I'd bet these devices are listening to what we're saying," Danielle, who did not give her last name, told KIRO-TV on Thursday. 

She said her family was shocked to find out that a talk they had in their home was sent to one of their contacts hundreds of miles away in Seattle, Washington.

The family has the voice-controlled smart devices installed in every room, which they use to control the heat, lights, and security system in their home. However, the family’s affinity toward Alexa changed after they received a phone call from a friend who provided details on the conversation. 

"We unplugged all of them and he proceeded to tell us that he had received audio files of recordings from inside our house," she told the news outlet. "At first, my husband was, like, 'No, you didn't!' And the [recipient of the message] said, 'You sat there talking about hardwood floors.' And we said, 'Oh gosh, you really did hear us.'"

 

Danielle said after the person replayed the voice note, she disconnected all the devices and contacted Amazon. The company assured her that they would investigate the situation.

"They said 'our engineers went through your logs, and they saw exactly what you told us, they saw exactly what you said happened, and we're sorry,'" she said. 

"He apologized like 15 times in a matter of 30 minutes and he said we really appreciate you bringing this to our attention. This is something we need to fix!"

However, the woman claimed that the company failed to give details regarding the privacy breach and what may have caused the device to act that way.

The online retail giant apologized and proposed to "de-provision" the device’s communications so that the family could continue to use its other features. But Danielle said that wasn’t enough and hoped to get a refund.

"Amazon takes privacy very seriously," a company representative told KIRO. "We investigated what happened and determined this was an extremely rare occurrence. We are taking steps to avoid this from happening in the future.”

Danielle’s case is not uncommon as eavesdropping has been an issue for users in the past. Amazon's smart voice assistant Echo reportedly had a coding flaw that could let hackers use the product to listen to private conversations, CNET reported in April. The company said it has since fixed the issue.

 

 

 

 

http://www.ibtimes.com/amazons-alexa-eavesdropped-conversation-sent-it-contact-miles-away-2684249?ft=95p2z

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