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Candace Owens decided to sue PolitiFact for their listing a post she wrote as disinformation, even though it was factually correct. 

After she sued, both PolitiFact and Facebook backed down like a bully who gets punched in the nose. Facebook claims that they decided in favor of Owens after she objected to the rating. The lawsuit had nothing to do with it. Right.

Facebook not only retracted the warning, but they also went so far as to issue an apology. Maybe more people should sue Facebook and their crooked fact-checkers. 

 

This is not the only problem Zuckerberg is facing. He and his wife funded an election initiative that allegedly violated the law by funding operations such as vote harvesting and illegally allowing people to fix their ballots.

The video in question is titled “Joe Biden is literally and legally not the President-elect. So why is the media pretending he is?” It was factually correct then just as it is factually correct today. 

In 2000 was George Bush the president-elect before the lawsuits were completed? So why should Biden be president-elect now?

 

Weeks ago, [Facebook] censored a post of mine which truthfully stated that [Joe Biden] is NOT the President-elect. So I got lawyers involved,” she said Saturday via Twitter. “Conclusion? [PolitiFact] uncensored the post & admitted that they LIED by rating my post false. The fact-checkers are lying for Democrats.”

The note from PolitiFact reads as follows:

 
 

Correction: PolitiFact originally labeled this video false in our capacity as a third-party fact-checker for Facebook. On Nov. 20, an appeal to that decision was made on behalf of Ms. Owens. PolitiFact approved the appeal on Nov. 20, determined that a correction was appropriate, and removed the false rating.

“At 8 Months pregnant, I unfortunately cannot fight on the ground alongside patriots like I am used to, but I am taking every measure to fight these communists in the court room,” Owens said in a follow-up post. “It is my goal to expose these lying ‘fact-checkers’ one by one. [Joe Biden] is NOT the President-elect.”

Owens, who’s currently suing fact-checkers from USAToday and Lead Stories, said that she knew she would get no satisfaction from Facebook without getting her lawyers involved. Facebook claims they are trying to find the reason her post was labeled false. When they have finished with that, they plan to help OJ find the real killer.

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I’m not defending Trump or his policies, but at least the Potus has open access by the press...he may answer, he may ignore them, he may tell the to F off, but at least he has the guts to be in front

Now we all have to quit quoting him so we never have to see a post from him.

The only Rock I see here is the heads of the people that think a single news source provides anything but biased reporting. most of the american news outlets are owned by a single company with a

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On a previous post there was a comment on 80 % of people lose interest in the New York Times. If that is the case why has this paper been publishing since September 18th 1851? Maybe for some it is because they can not see beyond their own narrow focus. Based on the many awards I will take this paper over alternative facts web sites that have popped up on this forum. 

Have any of those websites have the gravitas that the New York Times have? 

 List of Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The New York Times - Wikipedia

 

1910s[edit]

·         1918The New York Times, for complete and accurate coverage of World War I.

1920s[edit]

·         1923Alva Johnston, for distinguished reporting of science news.

·         1926Edward M. Kingsbury, for the most distinguished editorial of the year, "The House of a Hundred Sorrows".

1930s[edit]

·         1930Russell Owen, for graphic news dispatches from the Byrd Antarctic Expedition.

·         1932Walter Duranty, for reporting of the news from Russia.[2][3][dead link]

·         1934: Frederick T. Birchall, for unbiased reporting from Germany.

·         1935Arthur Krock, for distinguished, impartial and analytical Washington coverage.

·         1936Lauren D. Lyman, for distinguished reporting: a world beat on the departure of the Lindberghs for England.

·         1937Anne O'Hare McCormick, for distinguished foreign correspondence: dispatches and special articles from Europe; William L. Laurence, for distinguished reporting of the Tercentenary Celebration at Harvard, shared with four other reporters.

·         1938Arthur Krock, for distinguished Washington correspondence.

1940s[edit]

·         1940Otto D. Tolischus, for articles from Berlin explaining the economic and ideological background of war-engaged Nazi Germany.

·         1941The New York Times, special citation for the public education value of its foreign news reports.

·         1942Louis Stark, for distinguished reporting of labor stories.

·         1943Hanson W. Baldwin, for a series of articles reporting a tour of the Pacific battle areas.

·         1944The New York Times, for the most disinterested and meritorious service rendered by an American newspaper—a survey of the teaching of American history.

·         1945James B. Reston, for news and interpretive articles on the Dumbarton Oaks Security Conference.

·         1946: Arnaldo Cortesi, for distinguished correspondence from Buenos AiresWilliam L. Laurence, for his eyewitness account of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki and articles on the atomic bomb.

·         1947Brooks Atkinson, for a distinguished series of articles on Russia.

·         1949: C.P. Trussell, for consistent excellence in covering the national scene from Washington.

1950s[edit]

·         1950Meyer Berger, for a distinguished example of local reporting—an article on the killing of 13 people by a berserk gunman.

·         1951Arthur Krock, a special commendation for his exclusive interview with President Harry S. Truman: the outstanding instance of national reporting in 1950; Cyrus L. Sulzberger, special citation for his interview with Archbishop Stepinac of Yugoslavia.

·         1952Anthony H. Leviero, for distinguished national reporting.

·         1953The New York Times, special citation for its Review of the Week section which "has brought enlightenment and intelligent commentary to its readers."

·         1955Harrison E. Salisbury, for a series based on his five years in RussiaArthur Krock, a special citation for distinguished correspondence from Washington.

·         1956Arthur Daley, for his sports column, "Sports of The Times."

·         1957: James B. Reston (Scotty Reston), for distinguished reporting from Washington.

·         1958The New York Times, for distinguished coverage of foreign news.

1960s[edit]

·         1960A.M. Rosenthal, for perceptive and authoritative reporting from Poland.

·         1963Anthony Lewis, for distinguished reporting of the United States Supreme Court.

·         1964David Halberstam, for distinguished reporting from South Vietnam.

·         1968Anthony Lukas, for a distinguished example of local reporting—an article on a murdered 18-year-old girl and her two different lives.

1970s[edit]

·         1970Ada Louise Huxtable, for distinguished architecture criticism.

·         1971Harold C. Schonberg, music critic, for distinguished criticism.

·         1972The New York Times, for a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper—publication of the Pentagon Papers.

·         1973Max Frankel, for his coverage of President Richard Nixon's visit to China, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs.

·         1974Hedrick Smith, for a distinguished example of reporting on foreign affairs, coverage of the Soviet Union.

·         1976Sydney H. Schanberg, for his coverage of the fall of Cambodia, a distinguished example of reporting on foreign affairs; Walter W. Smith (Red Smith), for his "Sports of The Times" column, an example of distinguished criticism.

·         1978Henry Kamm, chief Asian diplomatic correspondent, for articles calling attention to the plight of Indochinese refugees; Walter Kerr, Sunday drama critic, for an outstanding example of distinguished criticism; William Safire, Op-Ed Page columnist, for his columns on the Bert Lance affair, an example of distinguished commentary.

·         1979Russell Baker, for his "Observer" column, an example of distinguished commentary.

1980s[edit]

·         1981Dave Anderson, for his "Sports of The Times" column, an example of distinguished commentary; John M. Crewdson, for his coverage of illegal aliens and immigration, a distinguished example of reporting on national affairs.

·         1982John Darnton, for his coverage of the crisis in Poland, a distinguished example of international reporting; Jack Rosenthal, deputy editorial page editor, for a distinguished example of editorial page writing.

·         1983Thomas L. Friedman, for his coverage of the war in Lebanon, a distinguished example of international reporting; Nan C. Robertson, for her article in The New York Times Magazine on her experience with toxic shock syndrome, a distinguished example of feature writing.

·         1984Paul Goldberger, for distinguished architecture criticism; John Noble Wilford, for national reporting on a wide variety of scientific topics.

·         1986Donal Henahan, music critic, for distinguished criticism; The New York Times, for explanatory journalism: a series of articles on the Strategic Defense Initiative, the "Star Wars" program.

·         1987The New York Times, for national reporting on causes of the Challenger shuttle disaster; Alex S. Jones, for distinguished specialized reporting on the dissension that dissolved a Louisville newspaper dynasty.

·         1988Thomas L. Friedman, for coverage of Israel, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs.

·         1989Bill Keller, for coverage of the Soviet Union, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs.

1990s[edit]

·         1990Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, for coverage of political turmoil in China, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs.

·         1991Natalie Angier, for coverage of molecular biology and animal behavior, a distinguished example of beat reporting; Serge Schmemann, for coverage of the reunification of Germany, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs.

·         1992Anna Quindlen, for "Public & Private," a compelling column covering a wide range of personal and political topics; Howell Raines, for "Grady's Gift," an account in The New York Times Magazine of his childhood friendship with his family's housekeeper and the lasting lessons of their interracial relationship.

·         1993John F. Burns, for courageous coverage of the strife and destruction in Bosnia, a distinguished example of international reporting.

·         1994The New York Times, for local reporting of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, pooling the efforts of the metropolitan staff as well as Times journalists covering locations as far-ranging as the Middle East and Washington; Isabel Wilkerson, for distinguished feature writing; Kevin Carter, for his photograph of a vulture perching near a little girl in the Sudan who had collapsed from hunger, a picture that became an icon of starvation.

·         1995Margo Jefferson, for her book reviews and other pieces, examples of distinguished criticism.

·         1996Rick Bragg, for distinguished feature writing; Robert D. McFadden, for distinguished rewrite journalism, applied to a broad range of stories; Robert B. Semple, Jr., for distinguished editorial writing on environmental issues.

·         1997John F. Burns, for distinguished international reporting on the Taliban movement in Afghanistan.

·         1998Linda Greenhouse, for reporting on the Supreme Court's work and its significance with sophistication and a sense of history; Michiko Kakutani, for reviewing 1997's many major literary works in essays that were fearless and authoritative; The New York Times, for a series of articles on the effects of drug corruption in Mexico, a distinguished example of international reporting.

·         1999Maureen Dowd, for the moral insight and wit she brought to bear in her columns on the combat between President Bill Clinton and Kenneth StarrThe New York Times, notably Jeff Gerth, for a series of articles disclosing the corporate sale of American technology to China with the approval of the U.S. Government despite national security risks.

2000s[edit]

·         2001:The New York Times, for national reporting, for its compelling and memorable series exploring racial experiences and attitudes across contemporary America. David Cay Johnston, beat reporting, for his penetrating and enterprising reporting that exposed loopholes and inequities in the U.S. tax code, which was instrumental in bringing about reforms.

·         2002The New York Times, for public service, for "A Nation Challenged," a daily special section covering the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks, the war in Afghanistan and America's campaign against terrorism. The section, which included biographical sketches of the victims, also appeared online; The New York Times, for its informed and detailed reporting that profiled the global terrorism network and the threats it posed, a distinguished example of explanatory reporting; The New York Times, for its photographs chronicling the pain and the perseverance of people enduring protracted conflict in Afghanistan and Pakistan, a distinguished example of feature photographyThe New York Times, for its consistently outstanding photographic coverage of the terrorist attack on New York City and its aftermath, a distinguished example of breaking news photography; Gretchen Morgenson, for her trenchant and incisive Wall Street coverage, a distinguished example of beat reporting; Barry Bearak, for his deeply affecting and illuminating coverage of daily life in war-torn Afghanistan, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs; Thomas Friedman, for his clarity of vision, based on extensive reporting, in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat.

·         2003Clifford J. Levy, for investigative reporting, for his "Broken Homes" series that exposed the abuse of mentally ill adults in state-regulated homes.

·         2004The New York Times, for public service, for its series written by David Barstow and Lowell Bergman that examined death and injury among American workers and exposed employers who break basic safety rules.

·         2005Walt Bogdanich, for national reporting, for his investigative series about the corporate cover-up of responsibility for fatal accidents at railway crossings.

·         2006Nicholas D. Kristof for commentary on bringing the genocide in Darfur to the world's attention; Joseph Kahn and Jim Yardley for international reporting for their examination of China's legal system; James Risen and Eric Lichtblau for national reporting for their coverage of the United States' government's secret eavesdropping program.

·         2007Andrea Elliott for feature writing for coverage of an immigrant imam striving to serve his faithful in America.

·         2008: Amy Harmon for explanatory reporting on the social impact of genetic tests; Walt Bogdanich and Jake Hooker for investigative reporting on how contaminated ingredients from China make their way into consumer goods, including medicine.

·         2009David Barstow for his tenacious reporting that revealed how some retired generals, working as radio and television analysts, had been co-opted by the Pentagon to make its case for the war in Iraq, and how many of them also had undisclosed ties to companies that benefited from policies they defended.

2010s[edit]

·         2010Michael Moss, in Explanatory Reporting, for an investigative feature on food safety (e.g., contaminated meat); Matt Richtel, in National Reporting, for a series on the dangers of distracted drivingSheri Fink of ProPublica in collaboration with The New York Times Magazine, in Investigative Reporting, for “The Deadly Choices At Memorial” about Hurricane Katrina survivors (award shared with the Philadelphia Daily News).[4][5]

·         2011Clifford J. Levy and Ellen Barry, in International Reporting, for their “Above the Law” series, which examined abuse of power in Russia, showing how authorities had jailed, beaten or harassed citizens who opposed them; and David Leonhardt, in Commentary, for his weekly column “Economic Scene” which offered perspectives on the formidable problems confronting America, from creating jobs to recalibrating tax rates.[6]

·         2012: David Kocieniewski, in Explanatory Reporting, for his series on tax avoidance; and Jeffrey Gettleman, in International Reporting, for his reports on famine and conflict in East Africa.[7][8]

·         2013David Barstow and Alejandra Xanic von Bertrab, in Investigative Reporting, for describing bribery by Walmart in Mexico; New York Times staff, in Explanatory Reporting, for examining global business practices of Apple Inc. and other technology companies; David Barboza, in International Reporting, for exposing corruption in the Chinese government; and John Branch, in Feature Writing, for "Snow Fall," a multimedia presentation about avalanches.[9]

·         2014Tyler Hicks, in Breaking News Photography, for his compelling pictures that showed skill and bravery in documenting the unfolding terrorist attack at Westgate mall in Kenya; Josh Haner, in Feature Photography, for his moving essay on a Boston Marathon bomb blast victim who lost most of both legs and now is painfully rebuilding his life[10]

·         2015: Eric Lipton, in Investigative Reporting, for reporting that showed how the influence of lobbyists can sway congressional leaders and state attorneys general, slanting justice toward the wealthy and connected; New York Times staff, in International Reporting, for courageous front-line reporting and vivid human stories on Ebola in Africa, engaging the public with the scope and details of the outbreak while holding authorities accountable (Team members named by The Times were Pam BelluckHelene CooperSheri Fink, Adam Nossiter, Norimitsu OnishiKevin Sack, and Ben C. Solomon.); and Daniel Berehulak, in Feature Photography, for his gripping, courageous photographs of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa[11]

·         2016Tyler Hicks, Mauricio Lima, Sergey Ponomarev and Daniel Etter for breaking news photography for coverage of the ongoing migrant crisis in Europe and the Middle East, and Alissa Rubin for international reporting for her coverage of the lives of women and girls in Afghanistan including the horrific murder of young Afghan woman who was beaten to death by a mob after being falsely accused of burning a QuranJohn Woo and Adam Ellick produced a powerful accompanying video about the murder.[12]

·         2017C.J. Chivers, in Feature Writing, for showing, through an artful accumulation of fact and detail, that a Marine’s postwar descent into violence reflected neither the actions of a simple criminal nor a stereotypical case of PTSD.

·         2017: The New York Times staff, in International Reporting, for agenda-setting reporting on Vladimir Putin’s efforts to project Russia’s power abroad, revealing techniques that included assassination, online harassment and the planting of incriminating evidence on opponents.

·         2017: Daniel Berehulak, in Breaking News Photography, for powerful storytelling through images published in The New York Times showing the callous disregard for human life in the Philippines brought about by a government assault on drug dealers and users. (Moved into this category from Feature Photography by the nominating jury.)

·         2018Jodi KantorMegan TwoheyEmily Steel, and Michael S. Schmidt in Public Service, for "explosive, impactful journalism that exposed powerful and wealthy sexual predators, including allegations against one of Hollywood’s most influential producers, bringing them to account for long-suppressed allegations of coercion, brutality and victim silencing, thus spurring a worldwide reckoning about sexual abuse of women." (Received jointly with Ronan Farrow of "The New Yorker".) [13]

·         2018: Staff, in National Reporting, for "deeply sourced, relentlessly reported coverage in the public interest that dramatically furthered the nation’s understanding of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and its connections to the Trump campaign, the President-elect’s transition team and his eventual administration." (Received jointly with the Washington Post.)[13]

·         2018: Jake Halpern and Michael Sloan, in Editorial Cartooning, for "an emotionally powerful series, told in graphic narrative form, that chronicled the daily struggles of a real-life family of refugees and its fear of deportation."[13]

·         2019: David BarstowSusanne Craig and Russ Buettner, in Explanatory Reporting, for "an exhaustive 18-month investigation of President Donald Trump’s finances that debunked his claims of self-made wealth and revealed a business empire riddled with tax dodges."[14]

·         2019: Brent Staples, in Editorial Writing, for "editorials written with extraordinary moral clarity that charted the racial fault lines in the United States at a polarizing moment in the nation’s history."[14]

2020s[edit]

·         2020: Dar Yasin, for Photojournalist.

·         2020: Mukhtar Khan, for Photojournalist.

·         2020: Staff, in International Reporting.

·         2020: Brian M. Rosenthal, for investigative journalism.

·         2020: Nikole Hannah-Jones, for commentary.

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1 minute ago, A330PilotCanada said:

On a previous post there was a comment on 80 % of people lose interest in the New York Times. If that is the case why has this paper been publishing since September 18th 1851? Maybe for some it is because they can not see beyond their own narrow focus. Based on the many awards I will take this paper over alternative facts web sites that have popped up on this forum. 

Have any of those websites have the gravitas that the New York Times have? 

 List of Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The New York Times - Wikipedia

 

1910s[edit]

·         1918The New York Times, for complete and accurate coverage of World War I.

1920s[edit]

·         1923Alva Johnston, for distinguished reporting of science news.

·         1926Edward M. Kingsbury, for the most distinguished editorial of the year, "The House of a Hundred Sorrows".

1930s[edit]

·         1930Russell Owen, for graphic news dispatches from the Byrd Antarctic Expedition.

·         1932Walter Duranty, for reporting of the news from Russia.[2][3][dead link]

·         1934: Frederick T. Birchall, for unbiased reporting from Germany.

·         1935Arthur Krock, for distinguished, impartial and analytical Washington coverage.

·         1936Lauren D. Lyman, for distinguished reporting: a world beat on the departure of the Lindberghs for England.

·         1937Anne O'Hare McCormick, for distinguished foreign correspondence: dispatches and special articles from Europe; William L. Laurence, for distinguished reporting of the Tercentenary Celebration at Harvard, shared with four other reporters.

·         1938Arthur Krock, for distinguished Washington correspondence.

1940s[edit]

·         1940Otto D. Tolischus, for articles from Berlin explaining the economic and ideological background of war-engaged Nazi Germany.

·         1941The New York Times, special citation for the public education value of its foreign news reports.

·         1942Louis Stark, for distinguished reporting of labor stories.

·         1943Hanson W. Baldwin, for a series of articles reporting a tour of the Pacific battle areas.

·         1944The New York Times, for the most disinterested and meritorious service rendered by an American newspaper—a survey of the teaching of American history.

·         1945James B. Reston, for news and interpretive articles on the Dumbarton Oaks Security Conference.

·         1946: Arnaldo Cortesi, for distinguished correspondence from Buenos AiresWilliam L. Laurence, for his eyewitness account of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki and articles on the atomic bomb.

·         1947Brooks Atkinson, for a distinguished series of articles on Russia.

·         1949: C.P. Trussell, for consistent excellence in covering the national scene from Washington.

1950s[edit]

·         1950Meyer Berger, for a distinguished example of local reporting—an article on the killing of 13 people by a berserk gunman.

·         1951Arthur Krock, a special commendation for his exclusive interview with President Harry S. Truman: the outstanding instance of national reporting in 1950; Cyrus L. Sulzberger, special citation for his interview with Archbishop Stepinac of Yugoslavia.

·         1952Anthony H. Leviero, for distinguished national reporting.

·         1953The New York Times, special citation for its Review of the Week section which "has brought enlightenment and intelligent commentary to its readers."

·         1955Harrison E. Salisbury, for a series based on his five years in RussiaArthur Krock, a special citation for distinguished correspondence from Washington.

·         1956Arthur Daley, for his sports column, "Sports of The Times."

·         1957: James B. Reston (Scotty Reston), for distinguished reporting from Washington.

·         1958The New York Times, for distinguished coverage of foreign news.

1960s[edit]

·         1960A.M. Rosenthal, for perceptive and authoritative reporting from Poland.

·         1963Anthony Lewis, for distinguished reporting of the United States Supreme Court.

·         1964David Halberstam, for distinguished reporting from South Vietnam.

·         1968Anthony Lukas, for a distinguished example of local reporting—an article on a murdered 18-year-old girl and her two different lives.

1970s[edit]

·         1970Ada Louise Huxtable, for distinguished architecture criticism.

·         1971Harold C. Schonberg, music critic, for distinguished criticism.

·         1972The New York Times, for a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper—publication of the Pentagon Papers.

·         1973Max Frankel, for his coverage of President Richard Nixon's visit to China, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs.

·         1974Hedrick Smith, for a distinguished example of reporting on foreign affairs, coverage of the Soviet Union.

·         1976Sydney H. Schanberg, for his coverage of the fall of Cambodia, a distinguished example of reporting on foreign affairs; Walter W. Smith (Red Smith), for his "Sports of The Times" column, an example of distinguished criticism.

·         1978Henry Kamm, chief Asian diplomatic correspondent, for articles calling attention to the plight of Indochinese refugees; Walter Kerr, Sunday drama critic, for an outstanding example of distinguished criticism; William Safire, Op-Ed Page columnist, for his columns on the Bert Lance affair, an example of distinguished commentary.

·         1979Russell Baker, for his "Observer" column, an example of distinguished commentary.

1980s[edit]

·         1981Dave Anderson, for his "Sports of The Times" column, an example of distinguished commentary; John M. Crewdson, for his coverage of illegal aliens and immigration, a distinguished example of reporting on national affairs.

·         1982John Darnton, for his coverage of the crisis in Poland, a distinguished example of international reporting; Jack Rosenthal, deputy editorial page editor, for a distinguished example of editorial page writing.

·         1983Thomas L. Friedman, for his coverage of the war in Lebanon, a distinguished example of international reporting; Nan C. Robertson, for her article in The New York Times Magazine on her experience with toxic shock syndrome, a distinguished example of feature writing.

·         1984Paul Goldberger, for distinguished architecture criticism; John Noble Wilford, for national reporting on a wide variety of scientific topics.

·         1986Donal Henahan, music critic, for distinguished criticism; The New York Times, for explanatory journalism: a series of articles on the Strategic Defense Initiative, the "Star Wars" program.

·         1987The New York Times, for national reporting on causes of the Challenger shuttle disaster; Alex S. Jones, for distinguished specialized reporting on the dissension that dissolved a Louisville newspaper dynasty.

·         1988Thomas L. Friedman, for coverage of Israel, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs.

·         1989Bill Keller, for coverage of the Soviet Union, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs.

1990s[edit]

·         1990Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, for coverage of political turmoil in China, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs.

·         1991Natalie Angier, for coverage of molecular biology and animal behavior, a distinguished example of beat reporting; Serge Schmemann, for coverage of the reunification of Germany, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs.

·         1992Anna Quindlen, for "Public & Private," a compelling column covering a wide range of personal and political topics; Howell Raines, for "Grady's Gift," an account in The New York Times Magazine of his childhood friendship with his family's housekeeper and the lasting lessons of their interracial relationship.

·         1993John F. Burns, for courageous coverage of the strife and destruction in Bosnia, a distinguished example of international reporting.

·         1994The New York Times, for local reporting of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, pooling the efforts of the metropolitan staff as well as Times journalists covering locations as far-ranging as the Middle East and Washington; Isabel Wilkerson, for distinguished feature writing; Kevin Carter, for his photograph of a vulture perching near a little girl in the Sudan who had collapsed from hunger, a picture that became an icon of starvation.

·         1995Margo Jefferson, for her book reviews and other pieces, examples of distinguished criticism.

·         1996Rick Bragg, for distinguished feature writing; Robert D. McFadden, for distinguished rewrite journalism, applied to a broad range of stories; Robert B. Semple, Jr., for distinguished editorial writing on environmental issues.

·         1997John F. Burns, for distinguished international reporting on the Taliban movement in Afghanistan.

·         1998Linda Greenhouse, for reporting on the Supreme Court's work and its significance with sophistication and a sense of history; Michiko Kakutani, for reviewing 1997's many major literary works in essays that were fearless and authoritative; The New York Times, for a series of articles on the effects of drug corruption in Mexico, a distinguished example of international reporting.

·         1999Maureen Dowd, for the moral insight and wit she brought to bear in her columns on the combat between President Bill Clinton and Kenneth StarrThe New York Times, notably Jeff Gerth, for a series of articles disclosing the corporate sale of American technology to China with the approval of the U.S. Government despite national security risks.

2000s[edit]

·         2001:The New York Times, for national reporting, for its compelling and memorable series exploring racial experiences and attitudes across contemporary America. David Cay Johnston, beat reporting, for his penetrating and enterprising reporting that exposed loopholes and inequities in the U.S. tax code, which was instrumental in bringing about reforms.

·         2002The New York Times, for public service, for "A Nation Challenged," a daily special section covering the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks, the war in Afghanistan and America's campaign against terrorism. The section, which included biographical sketches of the victims, also appeared online; The New York Times, for its informed and detailed reporting that profiled the global terrorism network and the threats it posed, a distinguished example of explanatory reporting; The New York Times, for its photographs chronicling the pain and the perseverance of people enduring protracted conflict in Afghanistan and Pakistan, a distinguished example of feature photographyThe New York Times, for its consistently outstanding photographic coverage of the terrorist attack on New York City and its aftermath, a distinguished example of breaking news photography; Gretchen Morgenson, for her trenchant and incisive Wall Street coverage, a distinguished example of beat reporting; Barry Bearak, for his deeply affecting and illuminating coverage of daily life in war-torn Afghanistan, a distinguished example of reporting on international affairs; Thomas Friedman, for his clarity of vision, based on extensive reporting, in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat.

·         2003Clifford J. Levy, for investigative reporting, for his "Broken Homes" series that exposed the abuse of mentally ill adults in state-regulated homes.

·         2004The New York Times, for public service, for its series written by David Barstow and Lowell Bergman that examined death and injury among American workers and exposed employers who break basic safety rules.

·         2005Walt Bogdanich, for national reporting, for his investigative series about the corporate cover-up of responsibility for fatal accidents at railway crossings.

·         2006Nicholas D. Kristof for commentary on bringing the genocide in Darfur to the world's attention; Joseph Kahn and Jim Yardley for international reporting for their examination of China's legal system; James Risen and Eric Lichtblau for national reporting for their coverage of the United States' government's secret eavesdropping program.

·         2007Andrea Elliott for feature writing for coverage of an immigrant imam striving to serve his faithful in America.

·         2008: Amy Harmon for explanatory reporting on the social impact of genetic tests; Walt Bogdanich and Jake Hooker for investigative reporting on how contaminated ingredients from China make their way into consumer goods, including medicine.

·         2009David Barstow for his tenacious reporting that revealed how some retired generals, working as radio and television analysts, had been co-opted by the Pentagon to make its case for the war in Iraq, and how many of them also had undisclosed ties to companies that benefited from policies they defended.

2010s[edit]

·         2010Michael Moss, in Explanatory Reporting, for an investigative feature on food safety (e.g., contaminated meat); Matt Richtel, in National Reporting, for a series on the dangers of distracted drivingSheri Fink of ProPublica in collaboration with The New York Times Magazine, in Investigative Reporting, for “The Deadly Choices At Memorial” about Hurricane Katrina survivors (award shared with the Philadelphia Daily News).[4][5]

·         2011Clifford J. Levy and Ellen Barry, in International Reporting, for their “Above the Law” series, which examined abuse of power in Russia, showing how authorities had jailed, beaten or harassed citizens who opposed them; and David Leonhardt, in Commentary, for his weekly column “Economic Scene” which offered perspectives on the formidable problems confronting America, from creating jobs to recalibrating tax rates.[6]

·         2012: David Kocieniewski, in Explanatory Reporting, for his series on tax avoidance; and Jeffrey Gettleman, in International Reporting, for his reports on famine and conflict in East Africa.[7][8]

·         2013David Barstow and Alejandra Xanic von Bertrab, in Investigative Reporting, for describing bribery by Walmart in Mexico; New York Times staff, in Explanatory Reporting, for examining global business practices of Apple Inc. and other technology companies; David Barboza, in International Reporting, for exposing corruption in the Chinese government; and John Branch, in Feature Writing, for "Snow Fall," a multimedia presentation about avalanches.[9]

·         2014Tyler Hicks, in Breaking News Photography, for his compelling pictures that showed skill and bravery in documenting the unfolding terrorist attack at Westgate mall in Kenya; Josh Haner, in Feature Photography, for his moving essay on a Boston Marathon bomb blast victim who lost most of both legs and now is painfully rebuilding his life[10]

·         2015: Eric Lipton, in Investigative Reporting, for reporting that showed how the influence of lobbyists can sway congressional leaders and state attorneys general, slanting justice toward the wealthy and connected; New York Times staff, in International Reporting, for courageous front-line reporting and vivid human stories on Ebola in Africa, engaging the public with the scope and details of the outbreak while holding authorities accountable (Team members named by The Times were Pam BelluckHelene CooperSheri Fink, Adam Nossiter, Norimitsu OnishiKevin Sack, and Ben C. Solomon.); and Daniel Berehulak, in Feature Photography, for his gripping, courageous photographs of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa[11]

·         2016Tyler Hicks, Mauricio Lima, Sergey Ponomarev and Daniel Etter for breaking news photography for coverage of the ongoing migrant crisis in Europe and the Middle East, and Alissa Rubin for international reporting for her coverage of the lives of women and girls in Afghanistan including the horrific murder of young Afghan woman who was beaten to death by a mob after being falsely accused of burning a QuranJohn Woo and Adam Ellick produced a powerful accompanying video about the murder.[12]

·         2017C.J. Chivers, in Feature Writing, for showing, through an artful accumulation of fact and detail, that a Marine’s postwar descent into violence reflected neither the actions of a simple criminal nor a stereotypical case of PTSD.

·         2017: The New York Times staff, in International Reporting, for agenda-setting reporting on Vladimir Putin’s efforts to project Russia’s power abroad, revealing techniques that included assassination, online harassment and the planting of incriminating evidence on opponents.

·         2017: Daniel Berehulak, in Breaking News Photography, for powerful storytelling through images published in The New York Times showing the callous disregard for human life in the Philippines brought about by a government assault on drug dealers and users. (Moved into this category from Feature Photography by the nominating jury.)

·         2018Jodi KantorMegan TwoheyEmily Steel, and Michael S. Schmidt in Public Service, for "explosive, impactful journalism that exposed powerful and wealthy sexual predators, including allegations against one of Hollywood’s most influential producers, bringing them to account for long-suppressed allegations of coercion, brutality and victim silencing, thus spurring a worldwide reckoning about sexual abuse of women." (Received jointly with Ronan Farrow of "The New Yorker".) [13]

·         2018: Staff, in National Reporting, for "deeply sourced, relentlessly reported coverage in the public interest that dramatically furthered the nation’s understanding of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and its connections to the Trump campaign, the President-elect’s transition team and his eventual administration." (Received jointly with the Washington Post.)[13]

·         2018: Jake Halpern and Michael Sloan, in Editorial Cartooning, for "an emotionally powerful series, told in graphic narrative form, that chronicled the daily struggles of a real-life family of refugees and its fear of deportation."[13]

·         2019: David BarstowSusanne Craig and Russ Buettner, in Explanatory Reporting, for "an exhaustive 18-month investigation of President Donald Trump’s finances that debunked his claims of self-made wealth and revealed a business empire riddled with tax dodges."[14]

·         2019: Brent Staples, in Editorial Writing, for "editorials written with extraordinary moral clarity that charted the racial fault lines in the United States at a polarizing moment in the nation’s history."[14]

2020s[edit]

·         2020: Dar Yasin, for Photojournalist.

·         2020: Mukhtar Khan, for Photojournalist.

·         2020: Staff, in International Reporting.

·         2020: Brian M. Rosenthal, for investigative journalism.

·         2020: Nikole Hannah-Jones, for commentary.

I really don't care what the New York Times creds are or are not, does any one else care? 

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Good Afternoon All:

From the New York Times:

How Misinformation ‘Superspreaders’ Seed False Election Theories - The New York Times (nytimes.com)

 

Researchers have found that a small group of social media accounts are responsible for the spread of a disproportionate amount of the false posts about voter fraud.

By Sheera Frenkel

Nov. 23, 2020, 12:09 p.m. ET

On the morning of Nov. 5, Eric Trump, one of the president’s sons, asked his Facebook followers to report cases of voter fraud with the hashtag, Stop the Steal. His post was shared over 5,000 times.

By late afternoon, the conservative media personalities Diamond and Silk had shared the hashtag along with a video claiming voter fraud in Pennsylvania. Their post was shared over 3,800 times.

 

That night, the conservative activist Brandon Straka asked people to protest in Michigan under the banner #StoptheSteal. His post was shared more than 3,700 times.

Over the next week, the phrase “Stop the Steal” was used to promote dozens of rallies that spread false voter fraud claims about the U.S. presidential elections.

New research from Avaaz, a global human rights group, the Elections Integrity Partnership and The New York Times shows how a small group of people — mostly right-wing personalities with outsized influence on social media — helped spread the false voter-fraud narrative that led to those rallies.

That group, like the guests of a large wedding held during the pandemic, were “superspreaders” of misinformation around voter fraud, seeding falsehoods that include the claims that dead people votedvoting machines had technical glitches, and mail-in ballots were not correctly counted.

“Because of how Facebook’s algorithm functions, these superspreaders are capable of priming a discourse,” said Fadi Quran, a director at Avaaz. “There is often this assumption that misinformation or rumors just catch on. These superspreaders show that there is an intentional effort to redefine the public narrative.”

Across Facebook, there were roughly 3.5 million interactions — including likes, comments and shares — on public posts referencing “Stop the Steal” during the week of Nov. 3, according to the research. Of those, the profiles of Eric Trump, Diamond and Silk and Mr. Straka accounted for a disproportionate share — roughly 6 percent, or 200,000, of those interactions.

While the group’s impact was notable, it did not come close to the spread of misinformation promoted by President Trump since then. Of the 20 most-engaged Facebook posts over the last week containing the word “election,” all were from Mr. Trump, according to Crowdtangle, a Facebook-owned analytics tool. All of those claims were found to be false or misleading by independent fact checkers.

The baseless election fraud claims have been used by the president and his supporters to challenge the vote in a number of states. Reports that malfunctioning voting machinesintentionally miscounted mail-in votes and other irregularities affecting the vote were investigated by election officials and journalists who found no evidence of widespread voter fraud.

The voter fraud claims have continued to gather steam in recent weeks, thanks in large part to prominent accounts. A look at a four-week period starting in mid-October shows that President Trump and the top 25 superspreaders of voter fraud misinformation accounted for 28.6 percent of the interactions people had with that content, according to an analysis by Avaaz.

“What we see these people doing is kind of like setting a fire down with fuel, it is designed to quickly create a blaze,” Mr. Quran said. “These actors have built enough power they ensure this misinformation reaches millions of Americans.”

In order to find the superspreaders, Avaaz compiled a list of 95,546 Facebook posts that included narratives about voter fraud. Those posts were liked, shared or commented on nearly 60 million times by people on Facebook.

 

Avaaz found that just 33 of the 95,546 posts were responsible for over 13 million of those interactions. Those 33 posts had created a narrative that would go on to shape what millions of people thought about the legitimacy of the U.S. elections.

A spokesman for Facebook said the company had added labels to posts that misrepresented the election process and was directing people to a voting information center.

“We’re taking every opportunity to connect people to reliable information about the election and how votes are being counted,” said Kevin McAlister, a Facebook spokesman. The company has not commented on why accounts that repeatedly share misinformation, such as Mr. Straka’s and Diamond and Silk’s, have not been penalized. Facebook has previously said that President Trump, along with other elected officials, is granted a special status and is not fact-checked.

Many of the superspreader accounts had millions of interactions on their Facebook posts over the last month, and have enjoyed continued growth. The accounts were active on Twitter as well as Facebook, and increasingly spread the same misinformation on new social media sites like Parler, MeWe and Gab.

Dan Bongino, a right-wing commentator with a following of nearly four million people on Facebook, had over 7.7 million interactions on Facebook the week of Nov. 3. Mark Levin, a right-wing radio host, had nearly four million interactions, and Diamond and Silk had 2.5 million. A review of their pages by The Times shows that a majority of their posts have focused on the recent elections, and voter fraud narratives around them.

None of the superspreaders identified in this article responded to requests for comment.

One of the most prominent false claims promoted by the superspreaders was that Dominion voting software deleted votes for Mr. Trump, or somehow changed vote tallies in several swing states. Election officials have found no evidence that the machines malfunctioned, but posts about the machines have been widely shared by Mr. Trump and his supporters.

Over the last week, just seven posts from the top 25 superspreaders of the Dominion voter fraud claim accounted for 13 percent of the total interactions on Facebook about the claim.

Many of those same accounts were also top superspreaders of the Dominion claim, and other voter fraud theories, on Twitter. The accounts of President Trump, his son Eric, Mr. Straka and Mr. Levin were all among the top 20 accounts that spread misinformation about voter fraud on Twitter, according to Ian Kennedy, a researcher at the University of Washington who works with the Elections Integrity Partnership.

Mr. Trump had by far the largest influence on Twitter. A single tweet by the president accusing Dominion voting systems of deleting 2.7 million votes in his favor was shared over 185,000 times, and liked over 600,000 times.

Like the other false claims about voter fraud, Mr. Trump’s tweet included a label by Twitter that he was sharing information that was not accurate.

Twitter, like Facebook, has said that those labels help prevent false claims from being shared and direct people toward more authoritative sources of information.

Earlier this week, BuzzFeed News reported that Facebook employees questioned whether the labels were effective. Within the company, employees have sought out their own data on how well national newspapers performed during the elections, according to one Facebook employee.

On the #StoptheSteal hashtag, they found that both The New York Times and The Washington Post were among the top 25 pages with interactions on that hashtag — mainly from readers sharing articles and using the hashtag in those posts.

Combined, the two publications had approximately 44,000 interactions on Facebook under that hashtag. By comparison, Mr. Straka, the conservative activist who shared the call to action on voter fraud, got three times that number of interactions sharing material under the same hashtag on his own Facebook account.

Jacob Silver contributed reporting.

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