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Pratt and Whitney GTF problems, again...

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Airbus Stops Taking PW1100G Engines

A series of unexpected in-flight shutdowns has prompted Airbus to halt accepting Pratt & Whitney PW1100G engines for the A320neo family.
Feb 10, 2018Jens Flottau and Aaron Karp | Aviation Daily
 

FRANKFURT – Airbus decided to stop accepting additional Pratt & Whitney PW1100G engines equipping its A320neo family aircraft, after a higher than normal number of inflight shutdowns and aborted take-offs were reported on aircraft using the latest build-standard engines.

The problem involves the knife-edge seal in the high-pressure compressor aft hub and can potentially appear on engines starting with serial number P770450. 33 aircraft, according to Airbus and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). Airbus says around one third of the in-service fleet of A320neos and A321neos has those engines installed so far, eleven of which are understood to have all two engines of the problematic standard and 21 just one of them. Pratt & Whitney had no immediate comment on the latest Airbus decision.

The problem could become much bigger if the engine supplier cannot find a quick fix, as the delivery schedule of  future A320neo aircraft will likely be seriously affected in that case.

The issue is the latest in a string of problems that have bedeviled the GTF program. The A320neo’s planned 2015 entry into service was pushed into 2016 because of GTF issues, and both Airbus and Bombardier have blamed Pratt for A320neo-family and C Series aircraft delivery delays as Pratt & Whitney struggled to ramp up production as fast as needed and as fixes to address reliability and durability shortfalls were simultaneously introduced. According to Pratt & Whitney, the latest issues do not involve engines for the Embraer E2 family and the Bombardier C Series, but are limited to the Airbus application.

The exact consequences of the Airbus decision are not yet clear, partly because the spare pool of PW1100G may include an unidentified number of engines that need no modification and can therefore be used. But Airbus has still parked around 30 otherwise completed aircraft at its manufacturing sites in Toulouse and Hamburg awaiting engines.

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) on Feb. 9 issued an emergency airworthiness directive (EAD) warning of a potential “dual engine” inflight shutdown on A320neo-family aircraft powered by Pratt & Whitney PW1100G geared turbofan (GTF) engines. Industry sources say a total of four such incidents or inflight shutdowns have been reported so far, but the actual number could be higher.

A Pratt spokesperson said the issue relates to a “limited sub-population” of PW1100G engines.

The EASA said that “several occurrences of inflight shutdown and rejected takeoff have been reported on certain” A320neo-family aircraft powered by GTF engines.

There are 113 A320neo family aircraft powered by the Pratt engines in service (the CFM Leap-1A engine is also an option on A320neo-family aircraft). Both A320neos and A321neos are affected.

EASA said aircraft with two affected engines can only operate three more cycles before one of them has to be replaced with a substitute that does not the aft hub issue. It is also said extended-range, twin-engine operations (ETOPS) can online be performed with two unaffected engines. Airbus has issued an Alert Operators Transmission (AOT) providing instructions “to de-pair the affected engines and discontinue [ETOPS] for aircraft fitted with affected engines,” according to EASA.

Neither the aircraft manufacturer nor the agency disclosed what airlines are operating aircraft with affected engines. However, Indian low-cost carrier Indigo confirmed it has grounded three A320neos after the EASA EAD was issued.

“We have identified the potentially affected engines and communicated with our customers,” the Pratt spokesperson said. “As a precaution, aircraft with these engines will be addressed in a manner consistent with the operational instructions issued by Airbus, and coordinated between Airbus and Pratt & Whitney as needed.”

Airbus said in a statement that Pratt is “investigating the root cause of this new finding with the full support of Airbus.”

 

http://aviationweek.com/commercial-aviation/airbus-stops-taking-pw1100g-engines

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The C-series and the Embraer E2 are a smaller version and don't seem to have the same problems as the Airbus does.

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CSeries engine problem just an oil seal leak: Pratt & Whitney

Pratt & Whitney officials, as well as Bombardier, are downplaying the engine problem that grounded the new CSeries commercial jets, causing Bombardier to leave them out of its showing at the Farnborough International Airshow currently on in the UK. The cause of the engine failure during a recent ground test has been identified only as a “rear compartment, oil seal issue.” It had previously been reported that the problem was more serious, having to do with the low-pressure turbine, a key component of the engine. But P&W have characterized as “minor modifications” the changes they have put in place in the engine.

The engine, called the PurePower® PW1500G, which was certified by Transport Canada in February 2013, is a geared turbofan (GTF) type engine. This type of engine has been selected for several new narrow-body jet programs in development, including the Bombardier CSeries, Airbus A320neo, Mitsubishi Regional Jet and the Embraer E2 Jets. According to P&W, the PW1500G delivers a 20 per cent fuel burn advantage over other aircraft now flying. The company also claims reduced emissions and reduced noise as benefits of the new technology. Since September 2010 the engine has had 4,000 hours of testing, including 340 hours of flight testing.

Pratt-Whitney-PurePower-geared-turbofan-engine-compressors-fan-gearbox-Bombardier-CSeries-Farnborough-Airshow-EDIWeekly PurePower® PW1500G engine from Pratt & Whitney. The company has invested billions of dollars in the technology and says it will begin service in 2015 on five major aircraft platforms, including the Bombardier CSeries.

The geared turbofan engine involves a high-speed, low-pressure turbine and high-pressure compressor. In describing the seal problem in the engine’s oil system, the president of P&W Commercial Engines, David Brantner said that the fan-drive gear system, the company’s proprietary technology, is “rock solid.”

The upstream intake fan is followed by a reduction gearbox that allows the low- and high-pressure turbines and compressors to run faster than the fan.

P & W issued a press statement about its geared turbofan engine program at Farnborough, saying that it has invested “billions of dollars” in the program  and plans to see its entry into service begin in 2015 and continue over the next four years on five “major aircraft platforms.”

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/bombardier-cuts-cseries-delivery-forecast-blaming-engine-shipments

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2 hours ago, Malcolm said:

CSeries engine problem just an oil seal leak: Pratt & Whitney

Pratt & Whitney officials, as well as Bombardier, are downplaying the engine problem that grounded the new CSeries commercial jets, causing Bombardier to leave them out of its showing at the Farnborough International Airshow currently on in the UK. The cause of the engine failure during a recent ground test has been identified only as a “rear compartment, oil seal issue.” It had previously been reported that the problem was more serious, having to do with the low-pressure turbine, a key component of the engine. But P&W have characterized as “minor modifications” the changes they have put in place in the engine.

The engine, called the PurePower® PW1500G, which was certified by Transport Canada in February 2013, is a geared turbofan (GTF) type engine. This type of engine has been selected for several new narrow-body jet programs in development, including the Bombardier CSeries, Airbus A320neo, Mitsubishi Regional Jet and the Embraer E2 Jets. According to P&W, the PW1500G delivers a 20 per cent fuel burn advantage over other aircraft now flying. The company also claims reduced emissions and reduced noise as benefits of the new technology. Since September 2010 the engine has had 4,000 hours of testing, including 340 hours of flight testing.

Pratt-Whitney-PurePower-geared-turbofan-engine-compressors-fan-gearbox-Bombardier-CSeries-Farnborough-Airshow-EDIWeekly PurePower® PW1500G engine from Pratt & Whitney. The company has invested billions of dollars in the technology and says it will begin service in 2015 on five major aircraft platforms, including the Bombardier CSeries.

The geared turbofan engine involves a high-speed, low-pressure turbine and high-pressure compressor. In describing the seal problem in the engine’s oil system, the president of P&W Commercial Engines, David Brantner said that the fan-drive gear system, the company’s proprietary technology, is “rock solid.”

The upstream intake fan is followed by a reduction gearbox that allows the low- and high-pressure turbines and compressors to run faster than the fan.

P & W issued a press statement about its geared turbofan engine program at Farnborough, saying that it has invested “billions of dollars” in the program  and plans to see its entry into service begin in 2015 and continue over the next four years on five “major aircraft platforms.”

http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/bombardier-cuts-cseries-delivery-forecast-blaming-engine-shipments

That article is from 2016...

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I don't understand why it took the engineering community so long to come up with geared fans as they don't appear to be a big jump in technology? If you look at the PW engine in cross section, it has a lot in common with the very old RR Dart design.

  

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Thanks Blues

Even though the Dart picture isn't very clear it's easy to see the common theme in the designs; i.e., fan - in line gear box - LPC - HPC - Cans - HPT - LPT- exhaust.

I am aware that the higher the hp, the more problematic the gearbox becomes, but that doesn't seem to be an issue with the new generation designs.

 

 

   

Edited by DEFCON

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22 minutes ago, DEFCON said:

Thanks Blues

Even though the Dart picture isn't very clear it's easy to see the common theme in the designs; i.e., fan - in line gear box - LPC - HPC - Cans - HPT - LPT- exhaust.

I am aware that the higher the hp, the more problematic the gearbox becomes, but that doesn't seem to be an issue with the new generation designs.

 

 

   

Sorry that was the clearest photo I could find of the RR Dart, however interesting comparison between old and new. 

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note etops ban

mergency Airworthiness Directive
AD No.: 2018-0041-E
Issued: 09 February 2018
Note: This Emergency Airworthiness Directive (AD) is issued by EASA, acting in accordance with
Regulation (EC) 216/2008 on behalf of the European Union, its Member States and of the
European third countries that participate in the activities of EASA under Article 66 of that
Regulation.
This AD is issued in accordance with Regulation (EU) 748/2012, Part 21.A.3B. In accordance with Regulation (EU) 1321/2014 Annex I, Part M.A.301, the
continuing airworthiness of an aircraft shall be ensured by accomplishing any applicable ADs. Consequently, no person may operate an aircraft to which
an AD applies, except in accordance with the requirements of that AD, unless otherwise specified by the Agency [Regulation (EU) 1321/2014 Annex I,
Part M.A.303] or agreed with the Authority of the State of Registry [Regulation (EC) 216/2008, Article 14(4) exemption].
Design Approval Holder’s Name:
AIRBUS
Type/Model designation(s):
A320 and A321 aeroplanes
Effective Date: 09 February 2018
TCDS Number(s): EASA.A.064
Foreign AD: Not applicable
Supersedure: None
ATA 72 – Engine – Operational Restrictions
Manufacturer(s):
Airbus
Applicability:
Airbus A320-271N, A321-271N and A321-272N aeroplanes, all manufacturer serial numbers (MSN).
Definitions:
For the purpose of this AD, the following definitions apply:
Affected engine: International Aero Engines model PW1127G-JM, or PW1127GA-JM, or
PW1130G-JM, or PW1133G-JM, or PW1133GA-JM engines, having Engine Serial Number (ESN)
P770450 or subsequent.
Reason:
Several occurrences of engine in-flight shut-down (IFSD) and Rejected Take-Off (RTO) have been
reported on certain Airbus A320neo family aeroplanes. While investigation is ongoing to determine
the root cause, preliminary findings indicate that the affected engines, which have high pressure
compressor aft hub modification embodied from ESN P770450, are more susceptible to IFSD.
This condition, if not corrected, could lead to dual engine IFSD.
EASA AD No.: 2018-0041-E
TE.CAP.00111-006 © European Aviation Safety Agency. All rights reserved. ISO9001 Certified.
Proprietary document. Copies are not controlled. Confirm revision status through the EASA-Internet/Intranet.
An agency of the European Union
Page 2 of 2
To address this potentially unsafe condition, Airbus issued Alert Operators Transmission (AOT)
A71N014-18, providing instructions to de-pair the affected engines and discontinue Extended range
Two-engine aeroplanes Operations (ETOPS) for aircraft fitted with affected engines.
For the reasons described above, this AD requires implementation of operational restrictions.
This AD is considered to be an interim action and further AD action may follow.
Required Action(s) and Compliance Time(s):
Required as indicated, unless accomplished previously:
Operational Restrictions:
(1) Within 3 flight cycles (FC) from the effective date of this AD, do not operate an aeroplane
having two affected engines installed.
(2) Within 1 FC from the effective date of this AD, for an aeroplane having at least one affected
engine(s) installed, ETOPS operations are not allowed.
(3) Inserting a copy of this AD in the ETOPS Configuration, Maintenance and Procedures (CMP) of
concerned aeroplane models and, thereafter, operating that aeroplane on ETOPS accordingly, is
acceptable to comply with paragraph (2) of this AD.
Ref. Publications:
Airbus AOT A71N014-18 original issue, dated 09 February 2018.
The use of later approved revisions of above-mentioned document is acceptable for compliance
with the requirements of this AD.
Remarks:
1. If requested and appropriately substantiated, EASA can approve Alternative Methods of
Compliance for this AD.
2. The results of the safety assessment have indicated the need for immediate publication and
notification, without the full consultation process.
3. Enquiries regarding this AD should be referred to the EASA Safety Information Section,
Certification Directorate. E-mail: ADs@easa.europa.eu.
4. For any question concerning the technical content of the requirements in this AD, please
contact: AIRBUS – Airworthiness Office – EIAS; Fax +33 5 61 93 44 51;
E-mail: account.airworth-eas@airbus.com.

 

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The biggest part of the GTF system is the planetary gearbox just aft of the fan.  The core engine is just a regular jet engine.

 

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  • & safety
  • India grounds 11 A320neos with PW1100G engines

India grounds 11 A320neos with PW1100G engines

  • 13 March, 2018
  • SOURCE: Flight Dashboard
  • BY: Aaron Chong
  • Singapore

India's Director General of Civil Aviation has ordered the immediate grounding of 11 Airbus A320neos fitted with Pratt & Whitney PW1100G engines following recent aborted take-offs and in-flight shutdowns.

The DGCA says that A320neos with engine serial numbers 450 and beyond will be grounded.

These comprise eight IndiGo A320neos and three GoAir aircraft.

The DGCA has also ordered the airlines not to refit the engines even though there are spares in their inventories.

The grounding follows the emergency landing of an IndiGo A320neo in in Ahmedabad on a service from Lucknow on 12 March. The aircraft "experienced [a] technical glitch with its Number 2 engine", says the carrier.

Two similar cases occurred recently, the DGCA notes: a Jammu-bound GoAir A320neo returned to Leh on 24 February and a Kolkata-bound IndiGo A320neo returned to Mumbai on 5 March.

The DGCA has been informed by the European Aviation Safety Agency that it is evaluating "some interim proposals," and will be revising the emergency airworthiness directive "in due course as soon as current affected engines will be modified with a safer interim design".

P&W expects to replace all the affected engines "by early June", adds the DGCA, even though "there is no concrete proposal in place at this stage to address the issue".

The regulator says it "will continue to be in touch with the stakeholders and review the situation in due course as and when the issue is addressed by EASA and P&W".

Flight Fleets Analyzer shows that IndiGo operates 29 A320neos within its fleet of 157 aircraft and has 398 of the type on order. Meanwhile, GoAir operates 13 of the re-engined narrowbody and has 131 on order.   Story Link: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/india-grounds-11-a320neos-with-pw1100g-engines-446704/

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How can operators retain ETOPS authorization utilizing a power plant with such a high failure rate?

I know there are different versions of the LEAP engine but the reliability of this one seems to exceed statistical reliability for ETOPS.

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I can't imagine anyone still is with these engines installed.

 

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Fixing faulty GTF seal to cost $50 million: P&W

  • 16 March, 2018
  • SOURCE: Flight Dashboard
  • BY: Stephen Trimble
  • Washington DC

A new design flaw discovered in January on about 100 Pratt & Whitney engines for the Airbus A320neo family will cost the engine manufacturer $50 million to resolve, P&W chief executive Bob Leduc said on 16 March.

P&W has resumed shipments of PW1100Gs to Airbus with a previous design of a knife edge seal in the high pressure compressor that does not have the flaw, Leduc says.

Of the 55 geared turbofans already delivered to Airbus’ assembly lines with the faulty knife edge seal, 22 have been shipped back to P&W to be fixed, he adds. The remaining 33 engines still at Airbus will be returned to P&W by the end of April, he says.

Around the same time, P&W also plans to have fixed the roughly 45 engines already delivered to airlines with the design flaw in the knife edge seal, Leduc says.

Despite the focus on fixing the affected engines, P&W still plans to keep deliveries on track to Airbus. In previous years, P&W had discussed plans to deliver 750-800 engines in 2018, but Leduc declines to provide an updated delivery forecast, saying the estimate would give competitors data on the company’s financial losses with each unit delivered. But Leduc did provide a long-range delivery estimate.

"Over the next three years we will deliver over 2,500 engines. That I will tell you," he says.

The $50 million cost to recover from the knife edge seal problem will increase the company’s losses on geared turbofan engine deliveries this year to "closer to $1.2 billion", Leduc says.

The knife edge seal was discovered in January after four aircraft experienced engine shutdowns on take-off or during flight.

Leduc says the engine’s original knife edge seal was delivered with a design flaw that required an inspection after a certain interval of flight hours.

A redesigned knife edge seal was introduced in the production system late last year, but made the problem worse. Instead of merely an inspection requirement, the redesigned knife edge seal caused the engine to shutdown.

P&W built and delivered about 100 engines with the flawed knife edge seal before the more serious shutdown problem was discovered.  Story Link: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/fixing-faulty-gtf-seal-to-cost-50-million-pw-446840/

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The knife edge seals are what prevents the air from going under the stators in the compressor section. The main rotor (a drum) which has the blades on it, turns while the stators do not. In order to seal in between the drum and the stators the rotor has knive edges which ride on a crushable Labyrinth seal preventing compressed air from leaking out.

image.png.6c4fb4786e66ef946523c0f2bef5058a.png

It cuts through the Labyrinth Seal on the bottom of the stators.

image.png.7b45e8bca4c203ee8d077dcaccfcc622.png

Edited by mrlupin
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On 2/12/2018 at 6:53 PM, DEFCON said:

Thanks Blues

Even though the Dart picture isn't very clear it's easy to see the common theme in the designs; i.e., fan - in line gear box - LPC - HPC - Cans - HPT - LPT- exhaust.

I am aware that the higher the hp, the more problematic the gearbox becomes, but that doesn't seem to be an issue with the new generation designs.

 

 

   

These are to diametrically opposed engine philosophies.  The Dart engine is a centrifugal flow engine and the P&W is an axial flow design.  The P&W accessory drive is external to the engine core and the dart is up front of the core.  The Dart drives a shaft and the P&W is a Turbo fan.

There is about as little in common as you can get.

On the P&W the gearbox behind the fan is just a planetary gear reduction system to reduce the speed of the fan in relation to the LPT.  For all intents and purposes the remainder of the engine is the same as any Turbofan engine.

 

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On 3/16/2018 at 4:32 PM, conehead said:

Good pics Mr lupin.  Is that finger attached to yourself?

Lol

It's not my finger... these are pictures I use when teaching borescope inspection... It's a CFM56 top case. Since knife edges and labyrinth seal are hard for some to imagine, seeing them with the top case off makes things fall into perspective.

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