Sign in to follow this  
Malcolm

Important Enough for It's Own Thread.... Energy

Recommended Posts

An inability to be a leader on pipelines will be the ruin of Justin Trudeau

Canada is a mockery for importing 700,000 barrels of oil a day in eastern Canada while being unable to move oil from Alberta to eastern markets.

 

The issue of pipelines is a key in Canada’s latest crossroads of national seriousness. The country didn’t arise from an anti-colonial revolution, like others in the Americas, or from a unique cultural homogeneity like Norwegians, Finns, Israelis and Czechs. It was a group of British-settled or occupied territories strung along the American border and hastily put together when the U.S. emerged united at last and with the greatest army and generals in the world after its Civil War, and unencumbered with any affection for the British Empire.

 

John A. Macdonald, the great and racially tolerant founder of the country, and George-Étienne Cartier and George Brown, conceived the only transcontinental, bicultural, parliamentary confederation in the history of the world, and secured its approval by squabbling colonial legislators in what are now four provinces (Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick), and by the British Parliament. Benjamin Disraeli was chancellor of the Exchequer, deputy prime minister and leader of the House of Commons in a government officially led by the Earl of Derby, who as colonial secretary had completely misjudged the issue of responsible government in Canada after the 1837 rebellion. Disraeli and William Ewart Gladstone, in the midst of their great rivalry of more than 35 years (during which they served as prime minister and chancellor a total of 13 times) had little knowledge of Canada, were skeptical about its survival, and Gladstone generally thought the Empire was nonsense anyway. They interrupted the intense debate over the Second Reform Bill, vastly expanding the British electorate, to put Macdonald’s British North America Act through. The colonial secretary, Lord Carnarvon, said they were creating what would eventually be one of the world’s great nations, and the governor general of Canada, Viscount Monck, spoke in the House of Lords in support of it with some eloquence.

 

Macdonald was nominated and elected the first prime minister but realized the new country needed a national purpose beyond not being American. He soon unveiled his “national policy,” which consisted of setting up more provinces, imposing a tariff that would facilitate the creation of a manufacturing industry, and most ambitiously, building a transcontinental railway that would connect the new country and be the spine of it. This was an immense undertaking: the Americans were pursuing the same objectives but they could lay track on farmland and gentle hills all the way to the Rocky Mountains and had a huge capital market to finance their railways. Canadian Pacific was largely built upon the rock of the Canadian Shield, and Canadian financial markets could finance only about a quarter of the costs. The financial centres of New York and London, where funds would have to be raised, were heavily influenced by forces connected to competing American railroads. Macdonald got his entire program through, and was followed by 15 years of Wilfrid Laurier extending rail service in the country and incentivizing immense waves of immigration. Macdonald and Laurier, prime ministers for 34 of Canada’s first 44 years as a Dominion (there were five prime ministers in the other 10 years), built a credible country, able to play an important and distinguished part in the First World War.

 

Other prime ministers were more than placemen. Robert Borden took the country through the First World War (though he used the English majority to impose conscription on French Canada). Mackenzie King ran always as a figure of French-English conciliation, and got the country through the Second World War without a major split, running a very distinguished war effort, and even taking the lead in urging president Harry Truman and British prime minister Clement Attlee into the Cold War after the Igor Gouzenko affair broke in Canada in 1946. Louis St. Laurent presided over peace and prosperity in the Fifties, Lester Pearson was a wide-ranging reformer. The only reason Pierre Trudeau entered pubic life was to defeat the Quebec separatists, and he did it when no one else could. Brian Mulroney tried unsuccessfully to complete the constitutional process but did succeed in putting through free trade and in moving the basis of federal income from taxes on income to taxes on goods and services, both vital achievements. Jean Chrétien and Paul Martin eliminated the federal deficit and passed the Clarity Act, making provincial secession more complicated after almost losing the 1995 Quebec independence referendum. Stephen Harper tried to shrink the public sector durably by reducing HST. Other leaders governed too briefly to leave much of a mark.

 

Canada appears completely dysfunctional; a chump among the world’s nations we so tiresomely lecture on their moral duties

 

For two-and-a-half years, the Justin Trudeau government has been preoccupied with full-body immersion in politically correct pandering to native people, gender warriors, and eco-alarmists, in fiscal extravagance, collective apologies, and Peter Pan posturing in the world. In strategic terms, Canada is a mockery for importing 700,000 barrels of oil a day in eastern Canada while being unable to move oil from Alberta to eastern markets. The accomplished financier and philanthropist Seymour Schulich last week sent round a letter to a Vancouver newspaper from a man in Seattle thanking Canada for the gift of “$100 million a day” because of the low oil price forced on Alberta by British Columbia, by preventing Alberta from exporting oil to world markets. The failure to supply our eastern provinces and to access fully the trans-Pacific markets, squabbling and envious provinces, and the lack of any effective federal leadership are a disgrace that makes Canada appear completely dysfunctional; a chump among the world’s nations we so tiresomely lecture on their moral duties.

 

http://nationalpost.com/opinion/conrad-black-an-inability-to-be-a-leader-on-pipelines-will-be-the-ruin-of-justin-trudeau

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Jaydee
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YVR Gas station just posted the highest price per litre in north America EVER.  $1.61 /Litre.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, boestar said:

YVR Gas station just posted the highest price per litre in north America EVER.  $1.61 /Litre.

 

Gets even worse...

 

“ 173.3 cents per litre on Haida Gwaii

Gas prices in Masset B.C. increased by five cents per litre overnight Saturday to 173.3 cents per litre. “

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/gas-prices-vancouver-north-america-high-1-65-1.4640601

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

Gets even worse...

 

“ 173.3 cents per litre on Haida Gwaii

Gas prices in Masset B.C. increased by five cents per litre overnight Saturday to 173.3 cents per litre. “

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/gas-prices-vancouver-north-america-high-1-65-1.4640601

Ah the benefits of a Carbon Tax and limiting the supply of product from Canadian Sources.  However since we in Alberta love to share, our gas in YYC is presently at 1.31 or so a liter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KINDER MORGAN PIPELINE TALKS HEAT UP AS DEADLINE NEARS

 

  • Calgary Herald
  • 1 May 2018
  • DON BRAID Don Braid’s column appears regularly in the Herald dbraid@postmedia.com Twitter: @DonBraid
getimage.aspx?regionKey=fI0oZpVnIQV13nkJK%2bpLlQ%3d%3dDARRYL DYCK/THE CANADIAN PRESS People listen as religious leaders and more than 100 members of diverse faith communities participate in a protest against the expansion of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline, at the company’s facility in Burnaby during the weekend.

Here we are in May, Kinder Morgan’s deadline month for staying with the Trans Mountain pipeline project.

The company vows to pull out by May 31 unless the B.C. government gives clear signs the project won’t be further obstructed.

With pressure building fast, federal and Alberta officials are meeting almost daily to work out some kind of ownership or backstop deal.

They convene in Ottawa and keep in regular contact with the company.

At this point, it seems unlikely that B.C. Premier John Horgan will meet Kinder Morgan’s condition by the end of the month — or ever.

These parties are farther apart than North and South Korea.

Last week, Horgan’s crew introduced new proposals to impose permits on bitumen shipments.

Kinder Morgan said the proposals “signal the province’s continued intention to frustrate the project.”

Both the Trudeau and Alberta governments have promised to save the Trans Mountain expansion with direct investment, and even public ownership, if necessary.

That’s what the talks in Ottawa are all about. They are said to be intense but positive.

To the Albertans, it’s understood that Ottawa will take the lead on any deal to buy out Kinder Morgan. If the feds are going to rescue this project, they want the credit.

The province’s role would be supportive, but could still include a large investment.

Predicting what happens in the next couple of weeks is risky business because the situation is “extremely volatile,” as one official said.

A key unknown is the impending Federal Court ruling on the validity of the National Energy Board approval.

The decision is running very late, forcing all the negotiations right up against Kinder Morgan’s deadline. “We could get it almost any second,” says another official.

There’s some chance that a solid court win for Alberta and Ottawa could change the dynamic, putting pressure on Horgan to ease up.

The Trudeau government might then break the logjam with a major promise: an increase in federal spending on marine safety, for instance.

If there’s a crack of light, Kinder Morgan might even extend its deadline.

But at this point, Horgan seems in no mood to relent. If he wants a friendship pact by May 31, he would hardly launch his own court reference on April 26.

The other possibility — a Federal Court decision with negative implications for the project — would likely kill any remaining hope of Kinder Morgan staying around.

As all this plays out, it’s very unlikely that Alberta will deploy Bill 12 to cut shipments of oil, gasoline and diesel fuel to the B.C. Interior and Lower Mainland. Polls in B.C. show growing support for the pipeline; it’s now at 54 per cent, according to one survey.

Many British Columbians worry about the implications of blocking an approved national project. Arguments about killing investment in B.C. are also taking hold.

Among 88 national signatories to an urgent letter asking Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to get the pipeline built, 19 were from B.C. organizations, including construction, tourism, chambers of commerce, oil and gas, mining, boards of trade, mayors and others.

A sudden choking of oil supply to B.C., even under new provocation from Horgan, could incite a backlash against Alberta and halt the surging support for the pipeline.

Alberta officials are already looking beyond May 31 to the sales job Premier Rachel Notley will face if the province spends billions on an ownership stake.

They’re calculating sales revenues that could come to the province once the pipeline is operating.

The idea of selling shares to the public — as the PCs once did with Alberta Energy Co. — is still being considered.

There’s risk in any public investment like this. But you can bet Kinder Morgan wouldn’t have stayed around this long if it didn’t expect massive profits.

The only certainty today is that the pipeline project won’t die on May 31. Failure could kill two governments. A lot of money will be spent to prevent that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the complaints about the proposed Kinder Morgan expansion is the increase in tanker traffic.   what will be the increase in tankers traffic  from the YVR fuel farm expansion with the tankers arriving from Asia?  The article talks about South Korea perhaps supplying the fuel but they are a net importer of oil 

Quote

South Korea relies on imports to meet about 97 per cent of its energy demand as a result of insufficient domestic resources, and the country is one of the world's leading energy importers.

https://maritime-executive.com/article/south-korea-hungry-for-oil-and-gas-2014-04-04#gs.=a3e6sY

New $150 million jet fuel pipeline project underway

Days could be numbered for current Kinder Morgan pipeline that supplies YVR with jet fuel

By Nelson Bennett | June 20, 2017 image.gif.b61667d98aeb334d4a1fd405432b2483.gif
 
Artist’s rendering of the new marine terminal and fuel receiving facility on the south arm of the Fraser River | Vancouver Airport Fuel Facilities Corp.

While debate rages over the Kinder Morgan Canada (TSX:KML) Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, another pipeline that has also generated controversy – one that could actually cut into Kinder Morgan’s business – is now under construction.

Last month, site preparation began in Richmond for a new tank farm that is part of a $150 million jet fuel terminal and pipeline that will supply airlines operating out of Vancouver International Airport (YVR) with jet fuel.

Once built, it could make obsolete the 48-year-old Kinder Morgan pipeline that currently supplies most of the airport’s fuel.

Numerous regulatory delays and opposition from the City of Richmond put the project several years behind schedule and more than doubled its original estimated capital cost, from $70 million to $150 million.

The project was at first slated to be finished in 2012. It is now expected to be completed in 2019 – provided there are no more delays in getting some of the outstanding permits that are still needed.

“The environmental assessment process did take quite a lot longer than we anticipated,” said Adrian Pollard, spokesman for the Vancouver Airport Fuel Facilities Corp. (VAFFC), the consortium of 25 airlines that is financing the project. “So we suffered some delays just due to regulatory requirements.”

The project involves building a new marine terminal on the south arm of the Fraser River, a tank farm and a 15-kilometre pipeline that will run through Richmond along Highway 99 and stretch west to Lulu Island.

The new terminal will be able to receive Panamax vessels, which will allow the consortium to source jet fuel from Asia.

Airlines operating at YVR get most of their jet fuel from a 48-year-old pipeline owned by Kinder Morgan, but only about 40% of the jet fuel moving through that pipeline comes from the former Chevron refinery, which is now owned by Parkland Fuel Corp. (TSX:PKI). The rest comes by barge from the Cherry Point Refinery in Washington state, and by tanker truck.

Because the Kinder Morgan airport pipeline is maxed out, it sometimes means up to 45 tanker trucks per day must augment the airport’s supply of jet fuel during peak periods, Pollard said.

The problem will only get worse as air traffic at YVR continues to grow.

“This project is being justified again and again, year after year, with the growth and statistics coming out of the airport,” Pollard said.

In the 10 years since the jet fuel pipeline project was first proposed, passenger numbers at YVR have grown by nearly 30%, and total passenger numbers are expected to grow to 35 million by 2037 from 22.3 million in 2015.

The airlines that belong to the consortium now rely on two refineries for all of their fuel. YVR has six to eight days of fuel storage capacity. The new tank farm will add a few more days.

The big concern for airlines is that if either or both refineries ever halted production for an extended time, they would have only about a week of fuel stored.

Once the VAFFC project is completed, the consortium will be able to buy jet fuel on the open market. South Korea is one likely supplier, said Rob Smith, energy director for IHS Markit.

He expects having access to new markets for jet fuel will drive prices down, which will affect both the refinery in Burnaby and Kinder Morgan.

The new pipeline might mean that the days are numbered for the Kinder Morgan pipeline that now supplies YVR, because airlines will be able to supply all of their own fuel.

It’s not clear what Kinder Morgan’s plans are for its jet fuel pipeline. The company did not return calls by press time.

“The airlines are the end customer,” Pollard said. “They’re financing this project; naturally they’re going to use it. And the capacity on that existing line will decline to such a point where it’s not really economical to maintain it.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YVR currently imports jet fuel from Washington state via barge.  Building a big expensive facility to bring it in by tanker (at higher cost) just shows that airport authorities have too much money to spend.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
May 2, 2018 4:00 am
Updated: May 2, 2018 6:41 am

B.C. continues to be ‘divided’ on Trans Mountain pipeline expansion

img_56751.jpg?quality=60&strip=all&w=40& By Richard Zussman Online Journalist based at B.C. Legislature  Global News 
 

British Columbians continue to be torn on how they feel about the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. In a poll released on Wednesday, Ipsos Global Public Affairs found that 55 per cent of people in the province polled support the project while 37 are opposed.

But when you dig into the issue more, 63 per cent of British Columbians are concerned about a tanker incident while 82 per cent said they want to see more federal money to protect the coast.

READ MORE: Support for the Trans Mountain expansion grows amidst pipeline dispute

“It is a divided province on these issues. Support is up, the project, British Columbians see it as in the public interest. But you can see even with 55 per cent supporting, there is not a mood for the federal government to bring down the hammer, there is not a mood here to have the provincial government to immediately backtrack on its position,” said Braid.

“We still see lots of British Columbians worried about tanker traffic and environmental protection and wanting to see the federal government do more than they have already promised.”

The poll was conducted for Global News between April 24 and 30. For the survey, 1,907 Canadians were interviewed online and weighting was used to balance demographics to ensure the sample reflected the composition of the adult population.

WATCH HERE: Poll shows support for Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion growing in B.C.

WEB_1800_Kinder_Morgan_Poll_tnb_1.jpg?w=670&quality=70&strip=all

The British Columbia government is opposed to the $7.4-billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion because of concerns over increased tanker traffic off the B.C. coast. The Kinder Morgan pipeline would increase the flow of bitumen nearly three times per day from north of Edmonton to Burnaby.

The company has said it will back away from the project on May 31 if it cannot get assurances from the federal government it will be built.

The province asked the B.C. Court of Appeal last week to review draft legislation that would allow the government to restrict permits for companies that want to increase the flow of bitumen by pipeline or rail through B.C. The B.C. government has vowed to use “all the tools in the tool shed” to stop the project.

As for Premier John Horgan, 48 per cent of British Columbians polled believe he is doing poorly on this issue while 39 per cent believe he is doing well.

“Having 39 per cent saying you are doing a good job on this issue is not that bad when you are a government that was elected with the support of 40 per cent of British Columbians,” said Braid. “If you look deeper into the numbers, 72 per cent of supporters think he is doing a good job. A slight majority of Greens do as well.”

READ MORE: Mixed results in poll over Trans Mountain pipeline debate

Horgan does not fare as well when the entire country weighs in. Just 23 per cent of Canadians polled believe the B.C. premier is doing well, while 43 per cent say he is doing poorly.

As for the federal government’s decision to use tax dollars to help ensure the pipeline gets built, 42 per cent of British Columbians support that idea.

As for the federal government using penalties against British Columbia if they don’t support the project, 37 per cent polled in B.C. support that idea while 73 per cent of Albertans belief their western neighbours should be punished.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Fido said:

YVR currently imports jet fuel from Washington state via barge.  Building a big expensive facility to bring it in by tanker (at higher cost) just shows that airport authorities have too much money to spend.

Not funded by the airport authorities but rather by the airlines.

Quote

“The environmental assessment process did take quite a lot longer than we anticipated,” said Adrian Pollard, spokesman for the Vancouver Airport Fuel Facilities Corp. (VAFFC), the consortium of 25 airlines that is financing the project. “So we suffered some delays just due to regulatory requirements.”

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Canada gaining reputation as 'a country that can't get its big projects done,' says Jean Charest

 

Former Quebec premier Jean Charest says past trouble with the Keystone XL pipeline project and the ongoing standoff between Alberta and B.C. over Trans Mountain are sending a message to business leaders that Canada is a country that struggles to get big projects completed.

Charest made the remarks in an interview with CBC News Network's Power & Politics. He said that over the last five years, the U.S. business press had linked Canada and Keystone XL in most news reports.

"For Canada there is a bigger message here that isn't just about this pipeline," Charest told host Vassy Kapelos. "The general impression it has left, not just in the United States but elsewhere in the world, is that Canada is a country that can't get its big projects done.

"That's the impression that's out there in the world right now and we need to be conscious of that."

 

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/charest-pipeline-keystone-trans-mountain-1.4644063

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keystone XL Could still win slow pipeline race

TransCanada project has had a strange and detour-filled journey since 2008

  • Calgary Herald
  • 2 May 2018
  • CHRIS VARCOE Chris Varcoe is a Calgary Herald columnist. cvarcoe@postmedia.com
getimage.aspx?regionKey=mtYvbQgmdZRYCzGu4%2fyIIQ%3d%3dJEFF MCINTOSH/THE CANADIAN PRESS Work on preparing for construction of the Keystone XL pipeline has begun and will increase as the permitting process advances through 2018, says TransCanada CEO Russ Girling.

Imagine placing several turtles on a racetrack.

The starter’s pistol sounds and one wanders off course, while the others plod ahead. But the slowest poke of all finds its way back on course and threatens to take the lead.

That’s a good way to picture TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline project today.

It’s impossible to definitively say which of the two largest pipeline proposals to move Canadian oil out of the country will be built first: the Trans Mountain expansion or Keystone XL.

But after facing an odyssey unlike any other, the once-dead Keystone project is back in the hunt.

“It looks at this point that Keystone will be the one,” said industry analyst Jennifer Rowland of Edward Jones.

“After all the years of pushback and delay, ironically that could be pipeline that gets done before anything else, especially before Trans Mountain.”

Today, the Trans Mountain expansion is surrounded by problems. Proponent Kinder Morgan is seeking some certainty from governments against the risk of further delay as it enters a heavy construction season.

The approved project was expected to be built by late 2020. Without a deal, Kinder Morgan could walk away from the development by the end of this month.

While adding less incremental capacity, Enbridge’s Line 3 replacement project appears to be the most progressed pipeline, although it hit a snag last week.

An administrative judge recommended Minnesota’s Public Utilities Commission only let it move ahead through the state on a different route than the one the company proposed.

In Canada’s Not So Amazing Pipeline Race, Keystone XL may represent this country’s best shot to end the transportation bottleneck with a significant increase in take-away capacity from Alberta.

“It’s pretty much got all of the decisions in place, it just needs a final go ahead from TransCanada,” analyst Martin King of GMP FirstEnergy said Tuesday.

It’s been a strange, detour-filled journey for TransCanada Corp. since the project was filed with regulators in 2008, proposing to take Western Canadian oil south to refiners in the U.S. Gulf Coast.

If built, the US$8-billion development would move 830,000 barrels of oil per day out of the Hardisty area to Steele City, Neb., where it connects with the company’s existing pipeline system.

After becoming a lightning rod for anti-oil activists, the project appeared finished when the Obama administration wouldn’t give it a presidential permit in 2015.

However, U.S. President Donald Trump endorsed Keystone XL last spring. Regulators in Nebraska approved an alternate pipeline route in November, giving the project momentum.

In January, TransCanada announced it had secured enough commercial commitment from shippers to position the project to proceed.

However, it still hasn’t made a final investment decision.

After the company’s annual meeting Friday, CEO Russ Girling said TransCanada’s firm 20-year contracts mean the project will be nearly fully utilized after factoring in capacity for spot shippers.

TransCanada is now negotiating with Nebraska landowners regarding the new approved route. It’s also keeping an eye on various appeals of permits and lawsuits in Nebraska and South Dakota brought against U.S. regulators and government agencies.

Work on preparing for construction has begun and will increase as the permitting process advances through 2018, he said.

“We look at all of those things as potentially dovetailing by year end,” Girling told shareholders.

For the industry, the prospect of sending more barrels south to the U.S. would be significant.

It would alleviate the current bottleneck in Canada and require less oil to move by rail, shrinking the price discount affecting Western Canadian producers.

The U.S. Gulf Coast is the world’s largest consuming market for heavy oil, with refiners gobbling up 2.8 millions barrels per day last year.

However, heavy oil imports to the region from Mexico and Venezuela are falling and there is demand for Canadian product.

“Although the U.S. has all this tight oil, they happen to be the world’s largest market for heavy sour crude, which is Canada’s largest-growing export segment. So it does match up and it’s a benefit to both,” said analyst Kevin Birn of IHS Markit.

Trans Mountain has other benefits that make the project strategically important for Canada.

It offers the industry market diversification, with the ability to send Western Canadian oil to the Pacific coast where it can be shipped to export markets in Asia.

Cenovus Energy CEO Alex Pourbaix, one of the country’s largest oilsands producers, said getting a route to tidewater makes Trans Mountain critical, but creating more capacity to the world’s largest heavy oil refining centre means Keystone XL is important.

Pourbaix, a former TransCanada executive, is optimistic the project will be built.

“I’ve had many discussions with Russ Girling at TransCanada and I’m confident from those discussions that TransCanada feels that the legal challenges they’re dealing with in Nebraska are manageable,” he added.

So why hasn’t the company made a decision to sanction the project yet?

Retired TransCanada executive Dennis McConaghy believe the pipeline firm is being cautious, trying to ensure it can start construction without suffering a major delay from a U.S. court ruling.

Both Trans Mountain and Keystone XL are marching to “similar but separate risks related to the courts right now,” he said.

“Quite honestly, I think right now if I was going to handicap them, I’d be a little more optimistic about Keystone XL,” said McConaghy.

Of course, building pipelines out of Canada isn’t a race. It’s more of a steeplechase — conducted in the middle of a mine field.

Two projects, Energy East and Northern Gateway, have already detonated. The remaining proposals have challenges ahead.

But Keystone XL is back in the game, even if it’s taken a decade to get to this point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Malcolm said:

Not funded by the airport authorities but rather by the airlines.

 

My bad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

.

Pollution from Canadian refineries an ‘embarrassment’ compared with U.S.

Canadian refineries pump out far higher levels of some key pollutants compared with their U.S. counterparts.

Wed., May 2, 2018 - Toronto Star

By Robert Cribb - Investigative Reporter
Carolyn Jarvis - Global News
Andrew Bailey -Toronto Star Data Analyst

The Imperial Oil refinery in Sarnia, Ont., and the Marathon Petroleum refinery in Detroit, Mich., have much in common: geography, climate and production levels.

What separates them is a 90-minute drive, a national border and starkly different emission levels for some key pollutants.

Sarnia’s Imperial Oil refinery emitted 10 times more fine particulate matter, seven times more carbon monoxide and 49 times more sulphur dioxide than the Detroit plant.

Those findings, based on 2014 data from the Canadian and U.S. governments, analyzed and published for the first time in a Toronto Star/Global News/National Observer investigation, are part of a national trend showing Canadian refineries pump out far higher levels of some key pollutants compared to their U.S. counterparts.

The average Canadian refinery produced less oil while emitting substantially higher rates of sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides compared with the U.S. average in 2014, the data shows. For example:

  •  Canada’s tiny fleet of 15 refineries emitted 62 per cent more sulphur dioxide (SO2) than 127 U.S. plants combined in 2014. Fourteen out of 15 refineries in Canada would have to cut their sulphur dioxide emissions by at least half to meet the average level of emissions in the U.S., the data shows. Of those, nine of them would need a reduction of 90 per cent or more to reach the U.S. average. Exposure to SO2 can harm the respiratory system and make breathing difficult, especially for those with asthma.
  • 11 of the 15 Canadian refineries would need to cut nitrogen oxides emissions by at least half to reach the U.S. average.
  •  Nine of the 15 would need at least a 50 per cent reduction in carbon monoxide emissions to reach the U.S. average.

In 2001, federal, provincial and industry officials agreed to move Canadian refinery emissions in line with U.S. benchmarks, a goal that remains far from complete 17 years later.

“It’s almost mind-boggling when you look at these numbers,” said Elaine MacDonald, an environmental engineer with the non-profit EcoJustice. “It would be quite an embarrassment to Canada for this data to be made public because it does show how far behind we are compared to the U.S.”

The key culprit behind the Canada/U.S. emissions gap, say experts, is less rigorous industry regulation and enforcement in Canada.

While federal oversight in the U.S. includes a strict regulatory regime with stiff penalties for oil companies, Canadian refineries are managed under a patchwork of provincial and municipal air regulations. There remains no federal cap for key pollutants; the result of years of impasse between oil companies, non-governmental organizations and government over how to address the emissions imbalance with the U.S.

Responding to the findings of this investigation, the Liberal government acknowledged the need for tougher air pollution emission measures in Canada, saying it is taking steps now to address it.

'A “key condition” of reaching lower targets, he said, is preserving the “competitiveness of the Canadian refining sector.”

.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
May 3, 2018 2:20 pm
Updated: May 3, 2018 2:59 pm

Federal government to intervene in B.C.’s Trans Mountain pipeline reference question

By Amy Judd and Richard Zussman Global News
THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

The federal government has announced it will intervene in the constitutional reference question filed by the government of British Columbia about the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, issued a statement Thursday saying:

“The Government of Canada will intervene in the constitutional reference question filed by the Government of British Columbia under the BC Constitutional Questions Act.

“We are confident in Parliament’s jurisdiction and will intervene on the question in order to defend our clear jurisdiction over interprovincial pipelines.”

In late April, the B.C. government asked the B.C. Court of Appeal to determine whether it can pass legislation that would require companies to get permits from the provincial government before increasing the flow of bitumen through the province.

If the appellate court approves, the new provincial rules would derail the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.

Back in February, B.C. asked the federal government to do a joint legal reference, but Ottawa declined. At the time, B.C. Premier John Horgan said that forced the province to “go it alone” in the court case.

READ MORE: B.C. government asking courts to rule on new permitting system to restrict bitumen flow

“We have asked the courts to confirm B.C.’s powers within our jurisdiction, to defend B.C.’s powers within our jurisdiction, to defend B.C.’s interests, so that there is clarity for today and for the generations to come,” said B.C. Premier John Horgan.

“Our government will continue to stand up for the right to protect B.C.’s environment, economy and coast.”

The government is asking the court to review proposed amendments to the Environmental Management Act that would give the province the power to regulate impacts of heavy oils, like bitumen, when spilled. The province is also asking the court to determine whether the effects of a spill will endanger human health, the environment or communities.

READ MORE: ‘We’ve made our decision’: B.C. First Nation speaks up for Trans Mountain pipeline

There is no timing on how long the court may take to receive submissions, schedule a hearing, then release a decision.

Kinder Morgan has imposed a May 31 deadline on the federal government to ensure that B.C. is on board with the $7.4-billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. The expansion would nearly triple the volume of bitumen flowing through the pipeline to Burnaby, B.C., from north of Edmonton.

There are three formal questions the government has placed before the Court of Appeal regarding the draft legislation. The questions are:

  1. Is it within the legislative authority of the Legislature of British Columbia to enact legislation substantially in the form set out in the attached Appendix?
  2. If the answer to question 1 is yes, would the attached legislation be applicable to hazardous substances brought into B.C. by means of interprovincial undertakings?
  3. If the answers to questions 1 and 2 are yes, would existing federal legislation render all or part of the attached legislation inoperative?

Link to article: https://globalnews.ca/news/4185517/federal-government-intervene-trans-mountain-pipeline-reference-question/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update - May 2018

Vancouver gas prices are now the highest in North America, thanks to the Provincial NDP carbon tax.

fQULWNqUpoc23dQ.jpg

And they are expected to keep on rising…

Justin Trudeau reacted to this news by saying that the record high gas prices they're seeing in BC are "exactly what we want." 

 

 

Edited by Jaydee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And if anybody has been watching question period....the issue is the cost of the liberals carbon tax plan. There was a freedom of information request for the governments own study, but the numbers relating to impact were redacted out. Hold on to your wallets....(.I love it when they say revenue neutral )

 

https://globalnews.ca/news/4186177/cost-families-carbon-tax-bill-morneau/

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

What happens when you have a businessman  in charge instead of a Flake feminist!

 

Energy industry insiders announced Friday that the United States is poised to become the world’ largest oil exporter; surpassing Saudi Arabia for the first time as early as next year.

 

According to Citigroup, the US currently produces approximately 8.3 million barrels of crude and refined oil per day compared with Saudi Arabia’s 9.3 million barrels.

Expanding American business and energy operations throughout the country are expected to boost those figures within months.

“Saudi Arabia has also trimmed its oil production more than 100 percent of the output cuts it agreed to under the January 2017 production deal. In March, Saudi crude production was at 9.91 million bpd, below the deal’s output target of 10.058 million bpd,” writes OilPrice.

The new projections fulfill a major campaign promise from President Donald Trump, who vowed to open new areas and unleash energy sector businesses to help make the United States energy independent.

 

https://www.hannity.com/media-room/america-first-us-to-become-worlds-top-oil-exporter-next-year/

 

 

Edited by Jaydee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jaydee said:

 

 

What happens when you have a businessman  in charge instead of a Flake feminist!

 

Energy industry insiders announced Friday that the United States is poised to become the world’ largest oil exporter; surpassing Saudi Arabia for the first time as early as next year.

 

According to Citigroup, the US currently produces approximately 8.3 million barrels of crude and refined oil per day compared with Saudi Arabia’s 9.3 million barrels.

Expanding American business and energy operations throughout the country are expected to boost those figures within months.

“Saudi Arabia has also trimmed its oil production more than 100 percent of the output cuts it agreed to under the January 2017 production deal. In March, Saudi crude production was at 9.91 million bpd, below the deal’s output target of 10.058 million bpd,” writes OilPrice.

The new projections fulfill a major campaign promise from President Donald Trump, who vowed to open new areas and unleash energy sector businesses to help make the United States energy independent.

 

https://www.hannity.com/media-room/america-first-us-to-become-worlds-top-oil-exporter-next-year/

 

 

And they can export their oil without fear of running out because they can always tap our oil which remains in the ground because of US funded lobbyists that have been successful in getting pipelines delayed or indeed cancelled.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that it has been outed, will the attacks begin?

The B.C. pipeline project you've never heard of — and why it may succeed

While you've likely never heard of the Eagle Spirit Energy pipeline, despite many obstacles it may be the next pipeline across B.C. that gets built, according to the project's CEO.

CEO of Eagle Spirit Energy pipeline project says even West Coast tanker ban can't stop it

Mike Laanela · CBC News · Posted: May 05, 2018 4:00 AM PT | Last Updated: an hour ago
 
eagle-spirit-energy-pipeline.jpg
The proposed route for the Eagle Spirit Energy Pipeline would run about 1,562 kilometres from Fort McMurray to a terminal at either Grassy Point, B.C. or Hyder, Alaska. (Eagle Spirit Energy)

You've likely never heard of the Eagle Spirit Energy pipeline, but for the past five years the project's leader has been quietly working on the plan to build the next pipeline across northern B.C.

"We are now putting together a very solid commercial plan for how we are going to do this," said CEO Calvin Helin earlier this week.

Helin is a member of the Lax Kw'alaams First Nation located on the north coast near Prince Rupert. That's where the proposed pipeline linking Alberta's oil sands with the West Coast would terminate.

 
calvin-helin.jpg
Calvin Helin is a member of the Lax Kw'alaams First Nation and CEO and president of Eagle Spirit Energy. (CBC)

At 1,500 kilometres in length, the pipeline would carry up to two million barrels of medium to heavy crude oil a day from Fort McMurray to tide water on the West Coast.

Estimates put the cost of the project, which has the backing of the Vancouver's Aquilini Investment Group, at $16 billion.

While such a proposal might seem foolhardy given the current politics in B.C., Helin is confident his proposal will succeed where others have stumbled or failed of late.

Bypassing tanker ban

One obstacle any northern pipeline would face is the federal Liberals' oil tanker ban. Bill C-48 is expected to pass final reading in the House of Commons next week.

That ban was first announced in November 2016, when the Liberal government halted Enbridge's proposed Northern Gateway pipeline across northwestern B.C. 

The Eagle Spirit project has been framed as an alternative to Northern Gateway.

If the tanker ban becomes law sometime later this year, it would seemingly render pointless any future crude oil pipelines with terminals on the North Coast.

 
tanker.JPG
Bill C-48 is expected to become law sometime this year, banning crude oil tankers from B.C.'s north coast. (Chris Corday/CBC)

But Helin says he has two possible solutions to bypass the ban.

First, his brother John Helin, who is the elected leader of the Lax Kw'alaams Band, has already launched a constitutional challenge in B.C. Supreme Court

That lawsuit claims First Nations were not properly consulted on the tanker ban, which he claims is discriminatory and infringes on their Aboriginal title.

Take it across the border

If the court challenge fails, Eagle Spirit Energy has a plan to avoid the tanker moratorium entirely, Calvin Helin says.

He said the group has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with a landowner across the U.S. border in Hyder, Alaska. The tiny town wants to host the pipeline as an alternative location for the port terminal, Helin said.

That landowner is Walter Moa, the president of Roanan Corp, who confirmed he's ready to do a deal to put the terminal on his land if necessary.

 

That would allow the supertankers to load up Alberta crude on the U.S. side of the Portland Channel, thereby avoiding Canada's jurisdiction altogether.

Both men say support in Alaska for oil projects runs deep.

"Within three weeks of that, we were contacted by the Alaskan government saying they would welcome the terminal with open arms." said Helin.

Agreements in principle in place

Another major obstacle that Helin claims he's overcome is securing agreements in principle with every one of the First Nations along the proposed route.

"That is where we have invested all of our upfront effort." said Helin, who admits it has been a challenging task getting so many First Nations on board.

"It's taken us five-and-a-half years," said Helin. who is now in the process of finalizing those agreements. "Pretty much we've just about got the whole thing done."

 
eagle-spirit-energy-project.jpg
The leaders of the Eagle Spirit Energy pipeline project say they now have agreements in principal from 35 First Nations along the pipeline route, and are moving toward signing final agreements. (Eagle Spirit energy)

Just who is signing those deals remains confidential and protected by non-disclosure agreements. CBC News has not confirmed they are in place along the entire route.

And there is some dispute.

Lax Kw'alaams's Allied Tribes said Eagle Spirit Pipeline supporters failed to consult them and the hereditary leaders support Bill C-48, the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act.

But several First Nations along the route have publicly supported the project since it was first announced in 2015, including other representatives of the Lax Kw'alaams, Gitxsan and Alberta's Treaty 8 First Nations.

Other First Nations leaders who might normally be opposed to such projects, such as Coast First Nations Board Chair Patrick Kelly, are reluctant to speak critically of it.

'That's the law and I respect it'

Even NDP MP Nathan Cullen, who represents the North Coast of B.C. and has supported the tanker ban, says if the project has First Nations support, he would be on board too.

"My highest order principles are First Nation rights and title, because that's law and I respect it." said Cullen.

He notes the First Nations approach is also getting the attention of major players in Calgary who learned from the mistakes made by Enbridge.

 
transmountain-facility-kamloops-20170327
New pipelines have faced significant obstacles in recent years, but the backers of the Eagle Spirit Energy pipeline say they have all the pieces in place for a successful project. (Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)

As for financing, Helin has already signed an agreement with Altacorp Capital, which is partially owned by the Alberta government, to raise the first $12 billion.

His next step, he says, is to put together a team of industry experts that will assemble an application to take to the National Energy Board for sometime in the next year and half.

If these obstacles can be overcome, Helin hopes the project could be completed in six years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Another giant oil company bailing  out of Canada...

 

“ Royal Dutch Shell Plc has agreed to sell out of oil-sands producer Canadian Natural RQesources Ltd.

The Anglo-Dutch company’s Shell Gas BV unit will divest all its shares in Canadian Natural for total pretax proceeds of US$3.3 billion, The Hague-based Shell said Monday. The sale serves the dual purpose of shedding one of its dirtiest assets, while reducing debt accumulated after the $50 billion purchase of BG Group Plc.

The shares are being offered at US$34.10 apiece, according to a person familiar with the matter. That’s a 2.9 per cent discount to Canadian Natural’s close on Monday in New York.

Shell had accounted for the money from the sale in its divestment program when the deal was originally announced last year and doesn’t bring the company closer to its US$30 billion target. At the end of the first quarter, Shell had completed US$26 billion of that program.

Beyond short-term debt reduction, the sale also has longer-term benefits. Chief Executive Officer Ben van Beurden has said he’s keen to demonstrate how an oil major can navigate a world focused on cutting emissions. He has repositioned Shell to focus on cleaner natural gas, shedding carbon-intensive assets such as oil sands.

The Canadian Natural sale was initially flagged last year, when oil prices were about US$20 a barrel lower. Shell said at the time it would sell almost all its production assets in Canada’s oil sands in a US$7.25 billion deal. As part of that accord, Canadian Natural agreed to issue about C$4 billion (US$3.1 billion) of its shares to Shell in payment for various assets.

Shell Gas has entered into an underwriting agreement with Goldman Sachs & Co., RBC Capital Markets, Scotiabank and TD Securities for the sale of the stake. Canadian Natural shares closed at $35.11 in New York on Monday.”

 

 

 

http://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/shell-to-sell-canadian-natural-resources-stake-for-3-3-billion-1.1072944

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jaydee said:

one of its dirtiest assets

That is certainly an unbiased statement

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now here is a funny, the BCI  (pensions for all including the politicians) evidently holds a very large number of KinderMorgan shares.

Cries of 'rank hypocrisy' as disclosures reveal B.C. government pension fund invests in Kinder Morgan

BCI manages pension investments for 569,000 British Columbians, including B.C. Premier John Horgan's pension

CALGARY — While the British Columbia government wages war against the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, its own employees are invested in the U.S. company behind the $7.4-billion project.

The British Columbia Investment Management Corp. (BCI), which manages the pension funds for B.C.’s public sector workers, owns stakes in the Canadian oil and gas industry as well as pipeline companies Kinder Morgan Inc., Enbridge Inc. and Pembina Pipeline Corp. Houston-based Kinder Morgan’s Canadian subsidiary, Kinder Morgan Canada Ltd., is developing the Trans Mountain Expansion. Kinder Morgan owns about 70 per cent of the voting interests of the Canadian unit. BCI does not hold shares in Kinder Morgan Canada.

Recent disclosures filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission show BCI has increased its exposure to Kinder Morgan in recent months even as the province has escalated its efforts to block the project, according to data gleaned by the Financial Post. The most recent SEC filings show BCI purchased an additional 21,214 shares during the fourth quarter of 2017 in Kinder Morgan, which recently suspended work on the pipeline.

The purchases bring BCI’s total stake in Kinder Morgan to 1,122,716 shares, a position worth more than US$18 million at current prices. BCI’s total net assets under management as of Dec. 31 were $135.5 billion.

B.C. Premier John Horgan declined to comment on what effect his government’s opposition to the pipeline expansion might have on BCI pension investments, which also include major oilsands producers Suncor Energy Inc. and Cenovus Energy Inc., both of which have signed up to ship oil through the expanded pipeline between Alberta and B.C.

B.C. organizations that support the pipeline described the government’s stance, given BCI’s investments in the sector, as “rank hypocrisy.”

“Even if you bike to work every day, your food and supplies are delivered to you via trucks using oil and gas and in many cases your retirement funds are directly tied to this vital industry,” Kris Sims, B.C. director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, said in an email. “The B.C. government needs to wake up to this reality and fast before they do further damage to Canadians.”

BCI manages the pensions  for the province’s teachers, provincial government and municipal government employees and also manages assets for several B.C. government agencies and bodies. All told, BCI manages pension investments for 569,000 British Columbians as well as the insurance benefit funds for 2.3 million workers in the province through WorkSafe BC. Janice Toker, spokesperson for the Victoria-based Crown corporation, said in an email “we do not publicly discuss our investment strategy.”

A spokesperson for the provincial finance ministry said BCI “fulfills its investment role on behalf of pension boards without any direction or influence from the B.C. government or MLAs.” She confirmed BCI oversees investments for MLA’s pensions, which would include that of Horgan.

BCI’s largest energy holding is Irving, Texas-based Exxon Mobil Corp. The fund recently purchased 90,368 shares in the super major, bringing its stake to 2,035,641 shares, worth more than US$157 million.

A breakdown from Bloomberg shows 5.8 per cent of BCI’s public investments is in the energy sector, worth about $3.8 billion.

In recent months, BCI has spent millions of dollars buying up U.S. oil and gas equities, including oilfield services companies like Halliburton Co., Helmerich & Payne Inc., and Schlumberger Ltd., as well as shale producers Midland, Texas-based Concho Resources Inc., Oklahoma City-based Continental Resources Inc. and Houston’s Occidental Petroleum Corp.

“They’re playing the biggest service companies and the biggest production growth basin,” said Rafi Tahmazian, senior portfolio manager and director at Toronto-based Canoe Financial, of BCI’s recent purchase.

image.png.9eb733dd93857e4f0e2e0e1cc805b496.png

Many of the U.S. oil companies BCI has recently purchased have assets in the Permian basin in Texas, which is expected to lead global oil supply growth next year.

Tahmazian, who’s focus is on the oil and gas sector, also said that based on the composition of BCI’s biggest energy holdings, the fund seems to be taking a generalist or “index hugging” approach to the oil sector. BCI also recently increased its exposure to major U.S. producers such as Chevron Corp., Exxon, ConocoPhillips, Phillips 66, Exxon, and others. All told, BCI owns stock in more than 30 oil and gas companies.

“If the sector ran hard and they were not in energy because of political decisions, then they would be underperforming and they would be criticized,” Tahmazian said.

He also said it’s a good sign that BCI’s portfolio managers have made investing decisions rather than political decisions.

“There’s an irony that (BCI’s investment managers) with their investor policy statement is obligated to have energy exposure and when they go into it, without taking the time to understand the sector better, they’re owning the biggest of the big names and they happen to be on the front lines,” he said, noting the debate over an oilsands pipeline has divided the province.

In its annual report on ‘responsible investing’, BCI said it was a signatory to the Climate Action plan to “take action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, consistent with the goal of the Paris Agreement to keep global temperature rise well below two degrees Celsius.”

The fund also said it voted in favour of a human rights shareholder proposals at meetings of both Enbridge and Marathon and urged them to report on the due diligence process they follow to identify environmental and social risks, including indigenous rights, when reviewing potential acquisitions.

“Shareholders are concerned that legal and reputational risks related to oil and gas projects
have grown steadily,” according to the BCI report.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this