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Jaydee

Conservatives....The Future of Ontario

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1 hour ago, deicer said:

Still, why isn't Ford showing up to answer questions? 

Cool, you finally noticed. There has been a precedent set with dodging questions and it seems to have previously gone unnoticed, along with a bunch of other stuff... some guy with nice hair I think. Can we expect more attendance checks and some closer monitoring in future?

 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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1 hour ago, deicer said:

Are you  referring to the bottle blond who spends most of his time watching TV in his bedroom.

Nope, this one is Canadian. Most other Canadians would rejoice if he locked himself in his bedroom and watched TV.

Maybe reruns of Captain Kangaroo on a continuous loop until the fall of 2019. 

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So you are therefore suggesting the elimination of carbon taxes did SFA to the price paid at the pumps?

 

Believe what you want though....

Edited by Jaydee

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If you look back to when the tax came off, gas in Ontario dropped to $1.24/litre.  Removing the tax took off 5 cents a litre.

It is disingenuous at best to credit the rest of the huge drop to Ford.

Believe what you want though.....

https://thenectarine.ca/business/ontario-gas-prices-dropping-5-cents-tonight-after-ford-government-removes-cap-and-trade-tax/

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The only surprise here is that ANYONE in their right mind would still contribute to this disaster. If anything they should be dissolved, deregistered !!

 

Ontario Liberal party struggling to raise money since June election

Ontario’s Liberal party has been struggling to raise money in the seven months since the June election, according to financial statements filed with Elections Ontario.

The party was trounced during the summer election, earning a total of seven seats and leaving the Liberals without official party status.

The downsized caucus resulted in the loss of a legislative research and hiring budget, as well as fewer speaking opportunities in Question Period. It also left them with an uphill fundraising climb.

 

https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/ontario-liberal-party-struggling-to-raise-money-since-june-election-1.4232728

Edited by Jaydee

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6 hours ago, Jaydee said:

earning a total of seven seats and leaving the Liberals without official party status

I have a 7 passenger SUV they could rent for caucus meetings.

....although they would have to coordinate with the Alberta NDP after the 2019 election

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On 12/28/2018 at 10:57 AM, Jaydee said:

The only surprise here is that ANYONE in their right mind would still contribute to this disaster. If anything they should be dissolved, deregistered !!

 

Ontario Liberal party struggling to raise money since June election

Ontario’s Liberal party has been struggling to raise money in the seven months since the June election, according to financial statements filed with Elections Ontario.

The party was trounced during the summer election, earning a total of seven seats and leaving the Liberals without official party status.

The downsized caucus resulted in the loss of a legislative research and hiring budget, as well as fewer speaking opportunities in Question Period. It also left them with an uphill fundraising climb.

 

https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/ontario-liberal-party-struggling-to-raise-money-since-june-election-1.4232728

The stole enough from us.  What did they spend it on?

 

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Another mess that is only getting worse.....for all that Toronto brags about, with a growing population, the heart of Canada’s economic engine, etc. .... health care must be getting to a crisis point.

“Across the province people spend an average of 16 hours in the emergency room before getting admitted. That’s more than two hours longer than three years ago.”

Just don’t get sick in Toronto.

https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/01/03/i-thought-we-were-in-a-third-world-country-ontario-emergency-room-wait-times-spike/

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1 hour ago, st27 said:

Another mess that is only getting worse.....for all that Toronto brags about, with a growing population, the heart of Canada’s economic engine, etc. .... health care must be getting to a crisis point.

“Across the province people spend an average of 16 hours in the emergency room before getting admitted. That’s more than two hours longer than three years ago.”

Just don’t get sick in Toronto.

https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/01/03/i-thought-we-were-in-a-third-world-country-ontario-emergency-room-wait-times-spike/

You are far better off in the big picture to spend an hour or two driving to a smaller community hospital where the wait times are significantly less. Been there done it...

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yep....people from Brampton crowd out our small hospital ER.  Pisses me off

 

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I recall reading somewhere that trudeau along with all the other federally elected people and their families are entitled to a much higher standard of care than anyone dependent on the public system; they don't have to mix with us, or wait for care.

And without any apparent consideration for the plight of the people, trudeau has recommitted to adding the medical needs of 350K + people to health care systems annually right across the Country for as long as he occupies the throne.

Even stranger, the provincial leadership doesn't seem too interested in pointing this observation out directly to the pm either?

 

 

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Quote

LeBlanc, the MP for the Beauséjour riding in New Brunswick, announced the diagnosis in a statement posted to Twitter on Wednesday. 

The statement, which was co-signed by his physician, Dr. Nicholas Finn, says the condition is a chronic disease that must be closely monitored but can be controlled. 

LeBlanc is scheduled to begin treatments next week, the statement said.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/dominic-leblanc-leukemia-diagnosis-1.4435564

Alan Rock, Minister of Health, (a few years ago)was diagnosed with prostate cancer and was on the table literally the next day.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/rock-gets-on-with-life-after-prostate-cancer/article4146229/

Forgive me for being skeptical that there are two types of care in Canada, depending whether you have been elected.

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1 hour ago, DEFCON said:

I recall reading somewhere that trudeau along with all the other federally elected people and their families are entitled to a much higher standard of care than anyone dependent on the public system; they don't have to mix with us, or wait for care.

And without any apparent consideration for the plight of the people, trudeau has recommitted to adding the medical needs of 350K + people to health care systems annually right across the Country for as long as he occupies the throne.

Even stranger, the provincial leadership doesn't seem too interested in pointing this observation out directly to the pm either?

 

 

we have been adding 250,000 on average per year for the last 50 years

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And a linear decline in the standard of care has gone hand in hand with the artificially increasing population, which should be a matter of some concern to Canadians I'd think. 

In the meantime, unwilling to acknowledge the difficulties & shortcomings of the health care system, like a twit, trudeau continues on blindly content to make an already intolerable situation even worse.

 

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2 hours ago, st27 said:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/dominic-leblanc-leukemia-diagnosis-1.4435564

Alan Rock, Minister of Health, (a few years ago)was diagnosed with prostate cancer and was on the table literally the next day.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/rock-gets-on-with-life-after-prostate-cancer/article4146229/

Forgive me for being skeptical that there are two types of care in Canada, depending whether you have been elected.

Re Prostate Cancer, it all depends on your Gleason Score, mine was high and I was operated on within 2 weeks of the results of the report.  https://www.cancer.org/treatment/understanding-your-diagnosis/tests/understanding-your-pathology-report/prostate-pathology/prostate-cancer-pathology.html

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Finally some teeth to back up existing legislation. When you start threatening their financing, administrators usually start paying attention. Now the only step remaining is to clear out the indoctrinators that currently pass for educators .

Free speech policy mandatory on campuses in new year

The province’s colleges and universities will be required to have a free speech policy in place in the new year.

Stephanie Rea — spokesman for Training, Colleges and Universities Minister Merrilee Fullerton — said the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) will assess each institution’s policy in January to advise the Minister whether it meets the minimum standard.

The Minister expects all colleges and universities will be in compliance as of Jan. 1, she said.

“The objective of the Ontario Campus Free Speech Policy is to ensure that each publicly-assisted college and university has a strong and clear free speech policy that is consistent across institutions,” Rea said in an email. “The policy will not only protect free speech but ensure that hate speech, discrimination and other illegal forms of speech are not allowed on campus.”

Conservative students have long complained that their voices are being censored on campuses.

And in 2017, Wilfrid Laurier University graduate student Lindsay Shepherd was told she was creating an unsafe environment for her students when she aired an episode of TVO’s The Agenda that featured University of Toronto Professor Jordan Peterson discussing his position on changes to the Canadian Human Rights Act.

shepherd1000.jpg?quality=60&strip=all&strip=all

Lindsay Shepherd speaks during a rally in support of freedom of expression at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ont. on Friday November 24, 2017. (Dave Abel/Toronto Sun) Dave Abel/  Postmedia Network

Premier Doug Ford promised during the spring provincial election campaign that he would require every publicly-funded post secondary institution adopt a free speech policy or face funding cuts.

 

https://torontosun.com/news/provincial/free-speech-policy-mandatory-on-campuses-in-new-year

 

Edited by Jaydee

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Doug Ford doing what Kathleen Wynne promised but failed miserably at...

 

PCs launch review of Ontario auto insurance system

The Ontario government is reviewing the province’s auto insurance system in a bid to lower rates for drivers.

It says it will examine practices in other jurisdictions to find ways to make improvements and introduce more competition in the system.

The Progressive Conservative government also says it will consult with drivers, insurance companies and other stakeholders until Feb. 15 to find ways to lower rates.

A report commissioned by the previous Liberal government found in 2016 that Ontario had the most expensive auto insurance premiums in Canada despite also having one of the lowest levels of accidents and fatalities.

The Liberals had promised an average decrease of 15 per cent in insurance rates by August of 2015 and when that self-imposed deadline passed, then-premier Kathleen Wynne admitted it had been what she called a “stretch goal.”

Finance Minister Vic Fedeli said the government will also create a regulatory framework that allows for modernization in the auto insurance sector.

“The previous government’s failed system of stretch goals on auto insurance is clearly broken,” he said. “Auto insurance rates in Ontario are among the highest in the country, and action is needed.”

 

https://torontosun.com/news/provincial/pcs-launch-review-of-ontario-auto-insurance-system

 

 

 

 

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Why we need a 'progressive' government and not a conservative one...

How Missouri’s minimum wage rates will trump Ontario’s wages of sin

Happy New Year, unless you live on Ontario’s minimum wage.

In which case, tough luck.

Ontario’s law mandating a $1 increase to the minimum wage, as of Jan. 1, has been formally rescinded by Premier Doug Ford. Instead, he legislated a 31-month freeze on the hourly minimum of $14.

Better luck in America, where the minimum wage is on the march while Ontarians stay frozen in time.

New York welcomed the New Year with a $15 minimum wage, catching up to San Francisco, but still lagging Seattle, which bumped it up to $16 last week.

Ah, that’s in U.S. funds. At prevailing rates, New York’s $15 minimum is worth about $20 in Canadian currency.

You can do the math. Seattle’s minimum wage workers ($21.25 after conversion) earn about 50 per cent more than their Ontario counterparts — with no sign of an economic slowdown after several years of pay hikes on the west coast.

Ah, you say. Ontario is different.

Weren’t we warned of the high price to be paid by workers earning higher wages — the proverbial and political wages of sin?

TD Bank predicted 50,000 to 150,000 jobs lost by the end of 2019 if Ontario went from the old $11.60 an hour to $14 and then $15.

The Ontario Chamber of Commerce countered with an even more apocalyptic study claiming 185,00 jobs were “at risk” from raising the minimum wage last year.

When big banks and big business raise the alarm about workers losing their jobs, presumably they have the best interests of our economy at heart, not their own self interest. Right?

But what if they’re wrong — not so much ideologically, but empirically and economically?

Never mind the awkward tweet from the chamber’s president, Rocco Rossi, ringing in Jan. 1 with pictures of champagne and pastries in which he joked about “celebrating New Year’s the 1 percenter way! Let them eat cake:-)”

Even with an emoticon tagged on to it, the tweet from a business mouthpiece who has spent the past two years leading the charge against a decent minimum wage came across as rich. Rossi responded to the resulting online storm with a prompt apology, doubtless discovering that Twitter means always having to say you’re sorry.

But isn’t there a larger lesson to be learned, beyond his faux pas, over the fallacious premises underpinning his study projecting maximum risks from a minimum wage? Let’s measure the chamber’s research against reality, projections versus performance:

On Jan. 4, Statistics Canada brought in the New Year with a look back at the unemployment data. Precisely how many jobs were lost over the 12 months from December 2017 to last month — when the minimum wage rose from $11.60 to $14 an hour?

Answer: Ontario’s total employment went up, not down, as our economy grew by 77,500 jobs — pushing unemployment to a remarkably low 5.4 per cent last month.

What role did the admittedly sharp wage increase of $2.40 an hour increase play in the changes? We know that business economists feared the worst — up to 185,000 jobs lost by the chamber’s count — but labour economists took a different view.

They argued, during the minimum wage debate, that traditional fears of job shocks are not just overstated but under-researched. There is precious little evidence showing that higher wages lead to lower employment from jobs leaving the country.

It’s not just the upside — the rapid economic stimulus from putting a few more dollars in the pockets of the lowest-paid workers who live paycheque to paycheque, spending any extra money directly on essentials. It’s also the limited downside in today’s service economy.

Despite the doomsday scenarios from small business owners, if a Tim Horton’s outlet has to raise its prices to meet its payroll there is minimal risk of a minimum-wage increase shipping those jobs out of country: Customers can’t go cross-border shopping for a double double, and domestic competitors can’t undercut them if everyone has to pay the same minimum wage.

Even in Donald Trump’s America, economic reality is overtaking political rhetoric. In Arkansas and Missouri, state legislators who refused to approve minimum wage hikes were overruled by voters in ballot initiatives last fall.

Ah, but those are low-wage states, you say? True, Missouri’s minimum wage rose from a paltry $7.85 to $8.60 an hour on New Year’s Day.

But Missouri will keep raising it over the next five years, reaching $12 an hour in 2023 (about $16 in Canadian funds) — well ahead of Ontario’s $14 rate, which will only be adjusted for inflation starting in late 2020 (adding about 30 cents a year assuming an annual inflation rate of 2 per cent).

Happy 2019. By 2023 we’ll know precisely how far once-proud Ontario has fallen behind the mighty state of Missouri.

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Also take into account that the $15 minimum wage in the US has more buying power than the equivalent in Ontario (canada for that matter) since the taxes are far less in the US than here.

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I have a favourite restaurant my wife and I frequent. Before the mandatory Liberal minimum wage increases our bill used to come in around $47 give or take. Since then the EXACT SAME ORDER costs $62 > $63.  A 25% increase ..:head:  ...Meanwhile my pension increased a whooping 1/2 % on January 1st this year. )

It’s not the restaurant fault and it’s not the employees fault..they had no choice but to comply....This is what happens when an out of control socialist government forces price increases in an area where free and fair enterprise should have control over. At some point citizens will say NFW and adjust their spending habits. Who will be the losers then ? the servers ?  the cooks ? the delivery person ? the people who clean ? The suppliers > etc etc....it certainly won’t be some socialist freak show called Kathleen Wynne.

 

The ripple effect of Ontario’s minimum-wage increase

 

The economic impact of Ontario's minimum-wage hike on the province's lowest earners has received a great deal of attention, but the effect is felt more broadly by employers who face labour cost increases.

Ontario increased its minimum wage to $14 from $11.60 on Jan. 1 and plans another hike – to $15 an hour – next year. As predicted, some businesses responded immediately by reducing hiringcutting employee work hours, reducing benefitsand charging higher prices. Further, Ontario experienced a decline of more than 59,000 part-time jobs in January, as highlighted by Statistics Canada. While it is too early to attribute this decline to any specific factor, the sharp wage hike is unlikely to have helped.

The hikes also likely spread beyond those earning a minimum wage; an increase in the minimum wage ripples through the wage distribution and potentially leads to higher incomes for other workers.

Many workers who earned close to the minimum wage prior to the increase likely also saw higher paycheques. Their remuneration needs to go beyond the new minimum wage to reflect their experience and ability. Otherwise, non-experienced minimum-wage employees and more experienced or higher-skilled workers receive the same pay, skewing incentives in the workplace.

Similarly, employers may raise all wages to maintain a relative hierarchy of wages according to employee skill levels. This broader wage adjustment may be necessary for businesses to remain competitive in the labour market and reduce turnover.

 

In these scenarios, business owners may substitute low-skilled employees with high-skilled workers because of an increase in the relative price of low-skilled labour. As such, raising the minimum wage could also increase the demand for skilled labour and, consequently, their wages.

How far does this ripple effect spread across the wage spectrum and how wide is its impact?

A Canadian study shows that raising the minimum wage significantly affects wages up to the 15th percentile of the wage-distribution ladder, that is, of the wages of the lowest 15 per cent of earners. The further wages of workers are from the minimum wage, the more the effect of any increase in minimum wage is mitigated.

As such, a minimum-wage increase has the potential to reduce income inequality, as more workers at the bottom of wage distribution earn wages close to middle-class wages. However, depending on its size, an increase in the minimum wage can have sharply different outcomes on the distribution of overall earnings.

In a C.D. Howe Institute study, Professor Joseph Marchand of the University of Alberta argued the poverty impact of a minimum-wage hike depends on whether minimum-wage workers kept the nature and working hours of their employment unchanged. It is best, as a result, to introduce such hikes when the economy is strong.

study that looked at the effect of minimum-wage increases on wage inequality across Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development-member countries also shows the minimum-wage hike actually begins to increase income inequality beyond a certain "maximum-effectiveness" level. After reaching this level, additional wage increases are too high, insofar as they can be accompanied by significant job losses and actually increasing inequalities as a result.

Furthermore, a higher minimum wage results in higher labour costs that are eventually passed onto customers, causing inflationary pressures. Thus, while raising the minimum wage seems to have no initial ripple effect on wages at the middle or top of the wage distribution, the impact on inflation eventually results in higher wages across the wage ladder.

The January weakness in Ontario's labour market will no doubt spur a debate on whether the province has exceeded the threshold at which higher minimum wages actually exacerbate, rather than reduce, inequalities. It would be wise to consider giving the labour market more time to adjust to the recent increase before rushing forward with the plan for a second increase, to $15 an hour, next January.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/rob-commentary/the-ripple-effect-of-ontarios-minimum-wage-increase/article38017258/

 

Edited by Jaydee

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While your article was from early 2018, here is more up to date information.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ontario-minimum-wage-freeze-employment-law-analysis-1.4877043

The problem with freezing the minimum wage is that now companies are finding it hard to hire and retain workers.  I am only going by my workplace, but when your full time new hires can't afford to live in the city where they work, it is a problem.  Poaching by other companies once the new hires are trained, just by offering a higher hourly rate, is a huge problem too.

As well, the evidence from every other jurisdiction that has raised it's minimum wage just backs up that it is a benefit to the local economy.

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