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Kip, any problem with this? off-topic

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I don't scuba but even I can see lots of problems with this:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/scorkl-breathe-underwater-with-total-freedom-gadgets-technology#/

 

Here's an interesting analysis of the device (start video at :29 second mark to avoid long channel intro): 

 

Edited by seeker

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Totally agree with the second video.....

Someone is gonna die using this thing .....even in scuba people die because they feel they can dive "outside" the envelope....for example, there will always be those that want to see how deep they can go with this thing and as long as they can keep clearing their ears they can probably go a long way, probably in excess of 100 feet. The problem is coming back up...Every dive we do, we stop at 15 feet to "gas-off" before doing the last part of the ascent.....normally 3-5 minutes,.to prevent  the possibility of an embolism. There will be those that want to challenge each other to see who can go the deepest and will not have enough air for the safety stop.

Sport divers are limited to 130 feet and need only a 5 min stop at 15 feet but no matter how deep the dive is , (under 130 feet)  you must do the 15 foot stop

 I did chase a shark once, (wanted a good photo) , and went to 170 feet but then I had to do decompression stops on the way up, as well as the 15 foot stop. ( we all use computers that tell us the numbers while we dive but if doing a deep dive we also have the manual plastic charts as back-up)

The other big factor is the use of the bicycle pump to replenish the mini-tank !!! The second video pretty much sums it up and I agree with everything the fellow said 

Something not mentioned is the possibility of developing a leak while pumping up the SCORKLE tank. Even if they get to 3000 PSI, a rupture would turn the gear into deadly missiles.

ADDED....What happens and you are horsing around underwater and someone kicks the bottle out of your mouth  and it sinks away???? In group dives I have seen folks all trying to see the "creature" someone found and regs have been kicked out of another divers mouth......fortunately qualified divers, in fact all scuba divers mouth regulators are attached to their tank, which is attached to their body and getting the reg back is no problem . An arm sweep maneuver is done to get your reg back.

IMHO....Don't even think of buying this deadly toy....

Want to go under water..?? .take an authorized course, get qualified, and yes, complete personal  gear is expensive, but you can rent complete and safe  gear from dive shops.

Edited by Kip Powick
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Kip - if you had the patience to watch that second video then congratulations, you more tolerant than I. (I could only take about one minute of his s-l-o-w droning voice.)

As to the point of this post - that SCORKL thing will never replace real SCUBA gear; and if somebody tries to use it on dives then deaths will surely follow.

However I can see a use for it - as an aid when snorkeling. Last time I was in Australia and snorkeling over the Great Barrier Reef with my trusty underwater camera there were several missed shots when I ran out of time and breath.  If I could have held my breath for another 75 seconds the photos would have been perfect.

So, I can see a use for a SCORKL if used for snorkeling. 

 

Quick question: how long have you two been diving? I was PADI certified in the 1960's.

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Hi John...

The difference between the majority of any Scorkl users and us is ....EXPERIENCE and COMMON SENSE.

We both are qualified divers and understand how we "might" use it as an aid but personally, I would use my 'spare air" if I had to.

With the younger crowd, I see too many "dares" and "challenges"

 

Started diving in 1957 and was diving 'alone'for many years.......left it when I joined the RCAF and did a few 'unsupervised " dives but then marriage happened and I finally got my wife qualified in 1996 and I became really  certificated in 1996...qualified as a Dive Master in 1999

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I usedd to have a Spare Air when I was active in Diving.  I have since sold it.  I used to use it solo on occasion for short little romps that exceeded my breath holding time.  As Kip said Common sense needs to be used.  I would only us it in the shallows to extend down time when snorkling and the like but never use it as a SCUBA tank. 

Of course it normally just stayed attached to my BC until I actually NEEDED it which was rarely.

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1 hour ago, John S. said:

Kip - if you had the patience to watch that second video then congratulations, you more tolerant than I. (I could only take about one minute of his s-l-o-w droning voice.)

 

In the comments the guy who posted this video mentions that he is a stoke survivor - that would explain the slow cadence.  One trick that many people don't know about youtube is that you can change the playback speed - just go to the settings tab on the bottom right and change the speed to 1.5X and this will solve your frustration.  (I do this with most videos since I can get the information with less time spent.)

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I would never buy such a thing, lots of dangers not to mention that it costs something in the neighbourhood of $1000.  I can imagine some legitimate uses however.  The first video at 1:45 shows a guy clearing a rope from a lower unit.  At really shallow depths, like 5-10 feet, it could serve a useful purpose on rare occasions.  Of course the initial cost, the effort to pump it up (which would be much more difficult that they show), the danger of catastrophic failure and the temptation to go deeper are deal-breakers.  Kinda like having a handgun in your house for self-defence - on very rare occasions it might prove useful but the rest of the time it's a dangerous thing to have around.

Edited by seeker

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Snarled a rope around one of the props on my boat ...no dive gear.

Had to go under about 4 feet and stay there and use a box cutter to get the rope off my prop shaft and prop.

Cut 5 feet of garden hose from extra hose onboard , put on a kids dive mask, had the wife hold one end of the hose above water  and spent about 15 minutes dicing and slicing the rope with the other end of the hose in my mouth.

Not the best way to breathe as exhaling was a bit leaky with just a small kids mask on ...but got the job done :P

Then I always carried dive gear on-board..."rescued' a few cell phones, glasses, cameras, and even a wrist watch for folks. The best  incident was a sailor who fouled his anchor in about 30 feet of water out at Main Duck island.  Geared up, went down and untangled his anchor from some rocks and not 5 feet from his anchor was another Kingston Plow anchor that someone fouled and just cut the line.. Retrieved that anchor, which I later sold for $300.00, and the first guy gave me a bottle of wine for saving his anchor !!

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Years ago I dove in a quarry with my brother. We recovered over 350 beer bottles which we returned for refund.  Not a bad haul.   

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28 minutes ago, boestar said:

Years ago I dove in a quarry with my brother. We recovered over 350 beer bottles which we returned for refund.  Not a bad haul.   

A friend of mine took himself and a few buddies and burned up mattresses. They then took the springs and metal arrangement and dumped them in favourite fishing holes. A week later they dove down on all the springs and took home an abundance of great fishing lures !!

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Yes....but only inhaling and exhaling through my nose with this little kids mask on.

Cant inhale and exhale through a tube that long as the exhalation breath would not clear the tube by the time I was ready to inhale.

 

All the best to you...off to KG to see three granddaughters:o

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A build up of CO2 will cause what is known as shallow water blackout which will lead to drowning.  While good in principle a system like this should have a pressure fed air source in order to prevent the CO2 build up.

I wear a CPAP mask when I sleep.  The Tube is over 6 feet long.  Exhalation is exhausted through vents in the mask so the delivery of clean air is continuous.  Something along those line would be required to be safe.  At that point you may as well just SCUBA.

 

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At one of the islands we go to they do have helmets that allow folks to walk underwater and they  are pressure fed air and exhaust through an exhalation valve in the helmet. A patrolling scuba diver ensures they do not venture off the prescribed path.

Never done it but folks that don't want to scuba find it fun.

I think it was called AquaNautas ............30 minutes = $45.00 USD...... probably no deeper than 15 feet

Naturally you can get your own video and photos for,  think about $40.00 USD

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For the once-a-year vacation this is probably good value, especially is it's properly supervised.

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for not much more you can take a PADI resort course (suicide course) and go SCUBA diving on a local charter.  Might not be the best option but neither is sucking air through a hose.

 

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4 hours ago, boestar said:

for not much more you can take a PADI resort course (suicide course) and go SCUBA diving on a local charter.  Might not be the best option but neither is sucking air through a hose.

 

But that's what you do when scuba diving;) if you don't suck with your reg.....you don't get air.:lol:

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I could see this thing being useful as a home safety device; place one in the dresser beside each of the beds in your home for use during egress from a smoke filled house fire.

 

 

 

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Don't know about this thing...actually looks like what we call a "pony" bottle but any tank related to scuba has to be visually checked each year and have a pressure test every 3 -5 years. I know for a fact that one can get extremely sick if sucking air from a tank that has been sitting a long time, and which DID NOT HAVE a CLEAN, (filtered),and  DRY  fill so I don't know how often this thing would have to be purged and then filled again using  this bicycle pump gizmo.

Personally I would rather rely on smoke and CO alarms and have an escape route planned..(we always did for all our entire family) 

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if you fill it yourself then who enforces the visual and hydro?  These things will never be checked.  They will kill people.

 

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