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Jaydee

Trudeaus ILLEGAL Immigration Policy Totally Out of Control

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On 10/18/2019 at 9:15 AM, st27 said:

While police are not describing this break-and-enter spree as crime tourism

Even though that's exactly what it is. 

Think about it for just a moment, people travel from half a world away to the GTA, go on crime sprees and then leave, passing all "after action reports" to the next group to arrive through brokers who take a cut of the proceeds.... and why wouldn't they?

The brokers set these folks up with what they need (lodgings, transportation etc) and coach them on the administrative aspects of "doing crime right in Toronto." Really now, what did you think was going to happen? Enjoy the show...

Edited by Wolfhunter

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Did Justin anticipate this?  and if so what is in place to help?

Hospital patients in Canada lacking English need access to interpreters, study says

Interpreters trained in medical terminology are more often provided for patients in Canada's larger centres, but a new study says lack of access to interpretation could result in unsafe health care through missed diagnoses and medical errors.

Risks include missed diagnoses, medical errors, research finds

The Canadian Press · Posted: Nov 04, 2019 8:50 AM PT | Last Updated: 7 hours ago
 
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The lead author of a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association says patients with a chronic disease and limited English are more likely to return to the emergency room or be readmitted to hospital because of poorer understanding of discharge instructions and not taking medication as required. (Shutterstock)
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Waking up with worsening pain had Surjit Garcha worried, but the red blisters on her stomach were so alarming that she went to her neighbour's home to try to explain, in her limited English, that she needed help.

Garcha, who lives alone, doesn't have the English skills to call her doctor's office and felt more comfortable going to someone she trusts.

Her neighbour took her to the emergency department in Delta, B.C., where Garcha learned she had shingles, a viral infection that can include complications such as scarring and vision and hearing loss in older adults.

 

Garcha, now 82, said the intense pain was bad enough, but not being able to understand what was wrong with her made her feel even more vulnerable.

"The employees who bring food to patients would leave it outside the door, because they could catch what I had and no visitors could come in my room,'' she said in Punjabi about her experience three years ago.

Garcha's only solace was that a nurse spoke Punjabi, but it wasn't until her daughter arrived from Seattle the next day that she had any contact with a family member.

Interpreters trained in medical terminology are more often provided for patients in Canada's larger centres, but a researcher from the University of Toronto said lack of access to interpretation could potentially result in unsafe health care through missed diagnoses and medical errors, suggesting language services should be a priority.

Dr. Shail Rawal, lead author of a study that includes data from Toronto General and Toronto Western hospitals, said patients with a chronic disease and limited English are more likely to return to the emergency room or be readmitted to hospital because of poorer understanding of discharge instructions and not taking medication as required, compared with those who are proficient in the language and were discharged with similar health concerns.

 
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Toronto physician and researcher Dr. Shail Rawal is the lead author of a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggesting hospitals across Canada provide professional interpreters for patients with limited English skills. (The General Medicine Inpatient Initiative/Handout via the Canadian Press)

The study was published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association and includes data for all patients discharged from the two hospitals with acute conditions, pneumonia and hip fracture, and chronic conditions heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, between January 2008 and March 2016, amounting to 9,881 patients.

 

"We saw that if you had heart failure and limited English proficiency you were more likely to come back to the emergency room to be reassessed in 30 days after you were discharged,'' said Rawal, an assistant professor in the University of Toronto's department of medicine and a staff physician at the University Health Network, which includes the two hospitals.

"Patients who had limited English proficiency and heart failure or chronic obstructive lung disease were more likely to be readmitted to hospital in the 30 or 90 days after discharge,'' she said.

The quality of care or the level of access to interpretation ... should not vary based on which hospital you happen to present at with your illness.- Dr. Shail Rawal

For those with pneumonia or hip fracture, the data showed no difference in return to hospital regardless of patients' ability to speak English, Rawal said.

"Our thinking is that those are acute conditions that have a pretty standard treatment, whether it be surgery and then rehabilitation or a course of antibiotics, whereas the two chronic conditions require a lot of patient-centred counselling and patient management plans.''

Of the 9,881 patients:

  • 2,336 had limited proficiency in English.
  • Nearly 36 per cent spoke Portuguese.
  • Just over 23 per cent spoke Italian.
  • Cantonese, Mandarin and Chinese were the primary languages for about 14 per cent of patients.
  • Greek and Spanish were the least spoken languages.
  • 18.5 per cent of the study subjects' languages were listed as "other.''

Rawal said patients at the two hospitals have around-the-clock access to interpretation in various languages by phone and in-person interpretation is also available but must be pre-booked and is typically offered during business hours.

"The quality of care or the level of access to interpretation, in my view, should not vary based on which hospital you happen to present at with your illness,'' she said.

"Currently, that is the case, that depending on what hospital you go to in our city, in our province or across the country, you will have varying levels of access to professional interpretation services and I think that in a linguistically diverse country the language needs of patients and families should be met by institutions.''

 
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The study included data from Toronto General Hospital. 'The quality of care or the level of access to interpretation, in my view, should not vary based on which hospital you happen to present at with your illness,' said lead author Shail Rawal. (David Donnelly/CBC)

Family members often step in to interpret and alleviate a patient's anxiety but may end up having to rearrange their schedules while waiting for nurses, doctors or specialists to show up at the bedside, Rawal said.

However, she said previous research studies have shown that families are less accurate in their interpretation than professionals and sometimes may not wish to translate what a clinician is saying, perhaps to lessen the impact if the prognosis would be too upsetting.

Kiran Malli, director of provincial language services for the Provincial Health Services Authority in British Columbia, said patients in Vancouver and the surrounding area have access to 180 languages through interpreters who work at hospitals and publicly funded long-term care homes.

The top three languages are Cantonese, Mandarin and Punjabi, Malli said.

In-person and phone interpretation is provided without a pre-booked appointment. The health authority started a pilot project last year to provide services by phone to family doctors' offices, she said.

 
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Patients at Vancouver General Hospital and surrounding areas have access to 180 languages through interpreters who work at hospitals and publicly funded long-term care homes. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Another pilot on video-remote interpreting at hospitals, which Malli said would greatly benefit patients needing sign language — which is already being provided — will also start soon and benefit those living in isolated parts of the province.

A few scattered grassroots programs were available in B.C. in the 1990s but the current standardized one didn't start until 2003, she said.

"It was getting pretty evident that we needed to do something a little more than just pulling up any bilingual person or calling on the overhead paging [system] to say 'If anybody speaks Cantonese could you please come to emergency,''' Malli said of the current program's genesis.

"Research shows us that as people get older, even if you know English when you're younger, you tend to revert back to your mother tongue as you age,'' she said, adding elderly people in medical distress tend to forget the English skills they have.

"I do think we are seeing more elderly patients for that reason,'' she said.

It's unfair for health-care staff to expect family members to act as interpreters because, just like English-speaking patients' relatives, their role should be to support their loved ones and not to be burdened further, Malli said.

"If we are looking at equity, as family I should just be there to support my family member through whatever it might be rather than act as their language conduit,"

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1 hour ago, Marshall said:

Did Justin anticipate this?  and if so what is in place to help?

Do you think he even cares?

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And how many new hospitals, doctors, nurses etc is trudeau funding to accommodate the goals of his immigration/family reunification targets?? Most of these newcomers (yup, I said newcomers, as opposed to old stock) head for Toronto,Montreal or Vancouver to an already clogged healthcare system.

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France 'takes back control' with non-EU migrant quotas

File pic of a worker weldingImage copyright Getty Images Image caption France currently has strict conditions for employers to take on foreign workers (file pic)

France is to impose quotas on the number of foreign workers from outside the EU, as part of measures aimed at addressing concerns about immigration, asylum and integration.

"We want to take back control of our migration policy," said Prime Minister Edouard Philippe.

Access to medical care will be cut for those who have no right to stay.

Migrant tent camps that have sprung up in areas of north-eastern Paris are to be cleared by the end of the year.

France is one of many European countries that have struggled to respond to an influx of irregular migrants and the government is under pressure to react to the political challenge from the far-right National Rally of Marine Le Pen.

 

What is the situation now?

The number of asylum requests rose by 22% in 2018 to 122,743.

Police stand by before operation at Grande-Synthe on 17 September 2019 Image caption This camp near the French port of Dunkirk was cleared in September amid concerns that migrants were trying to cross the Channel

In a sign that the government was taking a tougher tone on migration, the prime minister said France was not an island and taking back control meant that when France said yes it meant yes, and no really meant no.

Mr Philippe did not openly challenge existing EU asylum rules although he made clear that immigration, along with the environment, had to be priorities for EU institutions and the main incentive was "sovereignty".

"Taking back control of our migration policy means fighting back against abuses of the right of asylum, against irregular migration. Our country will therefore play its part so that Europe rebuilds," he said.

Mr Philippe's reference to taking back control of migrant policy echoed language used by pro-Brexit campaigners ahead of the 2016 UK referendum on leaving the EU.

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The dangers faced by migrants who cross the Channel

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Media captionThe dangers faced by migrants who cross the Channel

He said the government had found a fair balance between "rights and duties" without giving in to populism.

Several European countries have tightened their migrant policies in response to the influx into the EU that reached a peak in 2015.

Greece has seen a recent surge in numbers crossing from Turkey to the Aegean islands and last week parliament in Athens passed new measures aimed at speeding up the asylum process.

Mr Macron's government is considered centrist, drawing from both left and right, and the measures have not met with universal approval. Justice Minister Nicole Belloubet went on national radio on Wednesday to warn that she had "never considered quotas to be the answer".

How the quota system will work

Currently, employers who wish to hire from abroad have to follow a cumbersome system of explaining why a job cannot go to a French citizen.

The government has indicated it will adopt a new approach towards hiring migrant workers from outside the EU, with a view to the policies adopted by Canada and Australia. Australia uses a points-based system that focuses on professional and personal characteristics. Canada does too, with a cap on the number of workers applying for a visa without a job offer.

Labour Minister Muriel Pénicaud said on Tuesday that France had to recruit according to its needs and that quotas would be decided annually, with help from regional governments, job centres and social partners. The current number of migrant workers being offered visas is 33,000.

"We welcome [migrant workers] now, but not necessarily in jobs that are stretched. Conversely there are some jobs that are stretched which cannot be filled," she said.

The quotas will not take into account specific countries and migrant workers will be given a visa for a specific period and a specific job.

Although unemployment at 8.5% is relatively high for Western Europe, it has fallen from the rate of 10% when President Emmanuel Macron came to power in May 2017.

What are the other measures?

Many of the measures focus on migrants who do not have the right to stay in France.

The period of health cover will be reduced from 12 months to six, and those seeking asylum will have to wait three months before they can apply for basic cover.

France is keen to attract bigger numbers of students, doubling the current number to half a million by 2027. The prime minister said France was currently the world's fifth biggest host country for international students and risked losing out to countries such as China.

Rules on family reunions will be unchanged although the government has pledged to combat fraudulent reunions.

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16 minutes ago, Marshall said:

"We want to take back control of our migration policy," said Prime Minister Edouard Philippe.

Access to medical care will be cut for those who have no right to stay.

Migrant tent camps that have sprung up in areas of north-eastern Paris are to be cleared by the end of the year.

France is one of many European countries that have struggled to respond to an influx of irregular migrants and the government is under pressure to react to the political challenge....

It always seems (to me) that the backlash is worse than doing it right in the first place and that change is demanded  by the very voters who insisted on creating the problem.

The Second Law of Liberal Dynamics states:

The volume of screaming (racist, xenophobe, etc) is inversely proportional to cost borne by the screamer.  

 

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My recently developed feeling on the matter is this;

First decide how much money your country can afford to spend on immigrants.  Then figure out how many immigrants your country can successfully integrate per year.  Whichever is the smaller number is the number you take each year.  Then close the loopholes; illegal border crossings, chain migration, etc so that you get the best (most suited) immigrants.   Lots of statements about how we "need" immigrants due to labour shortages - the shortages are not in Toronto, Vancouver or Montreal so then decide where those immigrants will go; Timmins, Thunder Bay, Flin Flon, etc.  You want to immigrate to Canada - fine, you and your family are welcome - in Prince Albert.

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47 minutes ago, seeker said:

My recently developed feeling on the matter is this;

First decide how much money your country can afford to spend on immigrants.  Then figure out how many immigrants your country can successfully integrate per year.  Whichever is the smaller number is the number you take each year.  Then close the loopholes; illegal border crossings, chain migration, etc so that you get the best (most suited) immigrants.   Lots of statements about how we "need" immigrants due to labour shortages - the shortages are not in Toronto, Vancouver or Montreal so then decide where those immigrants will go; Timmins, Thunder Bay, Flin Flon, etc.  You want to immigrate to Canada - fine, you and your family are welcome - in Prince Albert.

At the same time we need to get serious re our requirements :

1. must be fluent in either of our 2 official languages. (includes family members)

2. Sponsors must be held accountable for the surety that they said they would provide for the immigrants.

3. Jobs (as seeker said, they must be forced to go to where the jobs are.

etc etc etc.  

 

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Liberals plan new program to allow communities to pick immigrants

Municipal nominee program is meant to help fill local labour needs

Kathleen Harris · CBC News · Posted: Jan 02, 2020 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 11 hours ago
 
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The federal government plans to create a new municipal nominee program to allow communities to select immigrants to fill labour gaps. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)
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The federal government plans to bring in a new immigration program that will allow cities and towns to pick newcomers based on local labour needs.

The Liberals promised to create a municipal nominee program during the election campaign. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau instructed new Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino to begin work on the project in his recent mandate letter.

 

The plan is to give local communities, chambers of commerce and labour councils a say in the selection of immigrants, helping them match newcomers with labour needs in various communities. At least 5,000 new spaces will be created for the program, according to the mandate letter.

Mendicino said this new pathway to permanent residency is another example of innovation in Canada's immigration programs, one that allows the system "to draw on local experiences, expertise, capacities to understand where are the labour shortages, where are the economic opportunities and how that information can help us select individuals who wish to come to Canada to ply their trade, to fulfil their opportunity."

 
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Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino will oversee the government's plan to bring in 1 million immigrants over the next three years. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press)

According to data provided by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), the worker-to-retiree ratio in Canada is now 4:1, but is projected to fall to 2:1 in 2035.

Over the last decade, 75 per cent of Canada's population growth has come from immigration, and by 2031, immigration is expected to account for 80 per cent of Canada's population growth, says IRCC.

The government already has a provincial nominee program to attract people with specific skills, education or work experience that could contribute to the economy of a specific region.

Other pilot programs have targeted newcomers to fill jobs in Atlantic Canada and in rural and remote communities.

Leah Nord, director of workforce strategies and inclusive growth for the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, said labour gaps persist across the country and nearly half a million jobs are going unfilled in many sectors.

'The way to go'

She said she welcomes the proposed municipal nominee program, adding that "devolving" the decision-making process to those who best understand local needs is "definitely the way to go."

Under the federal program, a high number of immigrants wind up in the country's biggest cities such as Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Ottawa and Halifax.

This program would help attract and retain skilled workers in smaller and mid-sized communities by aligning immigration intake with the job skills the local community needs, Nord said.

"One of the greatest ways to ensure immigration integration is a success is to have a job, to have labour market integration," she said. "And that comes from the employer, from the chambers, from the business point of view. Having them involved in the beginning and making them those liaisons is key to success."

Nord said she expects that under the new program, many newcomers will arrive with job offers already in hand, freeing them up to set down roots in the community and "hit the ground running."

Aging population

Pedro Antunes, chief economist for The Conference Board of Canada, said a municipal nominee program will allow communities to micro-target immigrants in sectors like construction or resource development.

At a time of aging demographics and declining fertility, he said, immigrants are crucial to Canada's labour market.

"The economic migrants play a big, big role ... in helping us grow our workforce at a time when, if not for immigration, we'd actually be seeing a decline in the number of workers in Canada," he said.

A May 2019 report from the Conference Board said that by 2030, more than nine million baby boomers will reach retirement age.

Between 2018 and 2040, nearly 12 million people are expected to leave Canadian schools and become workers — far short of the 13.4 million workers leaving the workforce.

Immigration is 'formative solution'

The report says immigration will remain a "formative solution" and account for all of Canada's net labour force growth.

Mendicino's mandate letter also tasks him with implementing Canada's immigration levels plan to bring a million new permanent residents to Canada over a three-year period. 

"This continues our modest and responsible increases to immigration, with a focus on welcoming highly skilled people who can help build a stronger Canada," his mandate letter reads.

Mendicino is also responsible for working with the provinces and territories to deliver high-quality settlement services to ensure the successful integration of new Canadians, and to measure outcomes with data collection.

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Thats not how it should work.  New immigrants should be able to pick where they settle, not be sent to City X like cattle or slaves.

 

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5 minutes ago, boestar said:

Thats not how it should work.  New immigrants should be able to pick where they settle, not be sent to City X like cattle or slaves.

 

With Trudeau’s new plan....who’s going to get stuck paying for the free loaders no community wants?  Yep...TAXPAYERS !!

Send them to Ottawa...they will fit in quite nicely there.

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What freeloaders?  Is that just a broad brush or what?

 

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1 hour ago, boestar said:

  Is that just a broad brush or what?

 

 

and then this.....how about protecting Canadians first and foremost as a National Policy ??

 

The RCMP was worried about anti-immigrant backlash in the wake of an alleged Kingston terrorist plot and raised concerns about a rise in protests due to "the government's position on immigration," new internal documents show.

Last January, the national police force charged a minor following a series of raids at two homes in Kingston after getting a tip from the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation — an operation dubbed "Project Salento."

Police also arrested an adult male in connection with an alleged plan to detonate explosives at an undisclosed location, but later released him. He was from Syria originally and came to Canada with his family in 2017 through a private refugee sponsorship program after living in Kuwait for 10 years.

On the day of the arrests, the RCMP, with the Kingston Police, drafted a public engagement strategy, a copy of which was obtained through an access to information request.

"The arrest of a Syrian refugee may cause some negative reaction on the Syrian population and immigrant population due to current anti-immigration sentiments," the strategy document reads.

"Families and communities are deeply affected when police take enforcement action during a national security investigation due to the stigma attached to 'terrorism'."

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/kingston-terrorism-anti-immigration-atip-1.5392098

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5 hours ago, Jaydee said:

With Trudeau’s new plan....who’s going to get stuck paying for the free loaders no community wants?  Yep...TAXPAYERS !!

Send them to Ottawa...they will fit in quite nicely there.

Most immigrants do really well after a period of time. They do proportionately better than a lot of "freeloading" people born here. Many have advanced training received abroad - credentials Canada won't recognize. So they do work of a lesser nature in order to feed their families. My dentist's assistant is a fully qualified dentist from Colombia - but it would require her to basically go through a university dental program in Canada to practise as a dentist here. Not saying that's reasonable or unreasonable - just that immigrants are willing to make sacrifices many native born Canadians won't. They will drive cabs, make beds and more. And don't give me the malarky that they will all vote Liberals. Jason Kenney when he was federal immigration minister was building bridges with the South Asian communities around Toronto and that might have won the Conservatives the 2015 election - or at least made it closer - if not for campaign missteps like snitch lines. 

You've got to get over the hangup that everything that the comes from the Liberals is bad, because in some cases, those policies or decisions would be perfectly fine for a Conservative government to make. The Liberals added the express visa program for tech workers - I don't see the "Open for Business" faction of the Conservatives opposing such a concept; I'd suspect they would be very receptive. And the Liberals are adding a small - 5,000 max per year - class for workers required to fill local employment needs. Again, that's nothing a Conservative government would feel uncomfortable about if it were an idea they came up with. Donald Trump has spent four years arguing that legal immigration in the US should be more like the Canadian and Australian systems.

The fact is we have an aging society. Today, there is something like a four to one ratio of working age people to retirees in Canada, and that is going to fall to 2-1 in the 2040s before it begins to reverse. That makes our health care system in particular - not to mention other basic government programs - impossible for such a ratio of working cohort to retirees to bear. Japan has always had an aversion to immigration, and now has to build out its work force with "guest workers" who ultimately add nothing, and invest nothing, in that country. Immigration is an engine of economic growth. Immigrants supply labour - something providing skills we need, sometimes doing unskilled work native born citizens won't do. But it's a net positive, although I suppose if you fear change of any kind - not that life is every frozen in time - immigration by people who don't look like you, speak like you, or think like you is intimidating. 

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/canada-economy-global-ranking_ca_5e0f619be4b0843d361182c2?ncid=other_twitter_cooo9wqtham&utm_campaign=share_twitter

Edited by dagger

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” The federal government plans to bring in a new immigration program that will allow cities and towns to pick newcomers based on local labour needs.”

I truly wish every illegal immigrant Trudeau allows to flood our borders have the same outcome as your example.

But alas that is not the case as the post here shows

 Refugees and asylum seekers are occupying 36% of the shelter spaces  in their case in hotel rooms or for 200 of them in the $1-million per month airy well-lit former North York Hydro building on Yonge St.“

meanwhile....

 Hardcore homeless are being shoved 100 at a time into airless $2.5-million Sprung warehouses in Liberty Village or on Strachan Ave. where beds are so close together diseases and illnesses are rampant, as is theft.”

https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/levy-street-sleepers-sign-of-decay-not-growth

 

 

 

Back to my original hypothesis...Who will have to foot the bill for the ones no community wants to touch with a 10’ pole ?

Answer.... The Canadian taxpayer. 
 

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25 minutes ago, Marshall said:

We should not confuse "Legal Immigrants" vs "Illegal ones". 

I figured that anyone following this thread would have figured that out by now, but apparently not so I changed the title of the thread to reflect such.

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2 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

I figured that anyone following this thread would have figured that out by now, but apparently not so I changed the title of the thread to reflect such.

👍     Sometimes you have to point out the obvious 😀 

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On 1/3/2020 at 10:15 AM, dagger said:

Most immigrants do really well after a period of time. They do proportionately better than a lot of "freeloading" people born here. 

Only 25% of Syrian refugees who arrived in 2015/16 are employed.

 

 

https://www.thepostmillennial.com/statistics-canada-less-than-25-of-syrian-refugees-are-currently-employed/

 

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Denmark's 'ghetto plan' and the communities it targets

Residents of largely Muslim neighbourhoods face increased penalties for crimes and 'Danish values' lessons for children.

Jamila Versiby Jamila Versi
3 hours ago
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Windows in Mjolnerparken are covered in stickers from Almen Modstand, a group organising against forced re-locations. The stickers read: 'Our home is not for sale!' [Jamila Versi/Al Jazeera]
Windows in Mjolnerparken are covered in stickers from Almen Modstand, a group organising against forced re-locations. The stickers read: 'Our home is not for sale!' [Jamila Versi/Al Jazeera]

At the end of each year, the Danish government publishes a list of what it classifies as the country's "ghettos". There are currently 28.

Areas where more than 50 percent of residents are immigrants or descendants of "non-Western countries" can be designated a "ghetto" based on the following criteria: income, percentage of those employed, levels of education and proportion of people with criminal convictions.  

Denmark is currently executing its controversial national "ghetto plan" - One Denmark without Parallel Societies: No Ghettos in 2030 - introduced by the previous government in March 2018, and now passed into a set of harsh laws and a housing policy.

This involves the physical demolishment and transformation of low-income, largely Muslim neighbourhoods. Residents of these areas - working-class, immigrant and refugee communities - say the measures are aimed at containing as well as dispersing them.

The term "ghetto", with its negative connotations of festering crime, unemployment and dysfunction is a source of anguish for residents who believe the plan stigmatises them further while offering no improvements to their conditions. Anger, confusion and a feeling of betrayal are mounting among those deemed to be living in "ghettos".

Residents of "ghettos" are now subject to a different set of rules. Penalties for crimes can be doubled. Certain violations, for example, which are normally finable offences could mean imprisonment.

Laws passed last March require children from the age of one to spend at least 25 hours a week in childcare to receive mandatory training in "Danish values". There was even a proposal from the far-right Danish People's party that "ghetto children" should have a curfew of 8pm, although that was rejected by the parliament.

But perhaps one of the most insidious rules is that public housing in so-called "hard ghettos" will be limited to only 40 percent of total housing by 2030. This means that public housing is now either being torn down, redeveloped or rented to private companies. The fear is that thousands across Denmark may have to leave their homes. By some reports, that number could be more than 11,000 people.

Poul Aaroe Pedersen, a spokesperson at the Ministry of Transport and Housing, which is overseeing the housing changes, said in an email that the aim "is to prevent parallel societies" by integrating "socially disadvantaged residential areas" with the surrounding community through the development of different types of housing.

Pederson said it is not possible to provide an exact number for how many people would need to move.

According to lawyer Morten Tarp, two communities, one in the city of Helsingor and the other in the town of Slagelse, whose residents he is working to support, will receive the country's first housing contract termination notices in early 2020.

Mjolnerparken, a so-called "hard ghetto", is a four-block housing complex situated in Norrebro, a lively, multicultural and gentrifying district in Copenhagen.

There, 260 residencies will be sold. Residents have been informed through the housing association that they will have to move and are being encouraged to relocate to other areas. Many are uncertain about what will happen next.

We visited Mjolnerparken and spoke to four residents about how the regulations are affecting their lives and their fears for the future.

Lisbeth Saugmann, 76, pensioner: 'I'm being forcibly relocated'

Lisbeth
Lisbeth Saugmann grew up and spent most of her life in low-income housing, referred to by some as 'ghettos' [Jamila Versi/Al Jazeera] 

Lisbeth has lived in the residence for elderly people in Mjolnerparken for almost a decade. She has been informed by the housing association that she will have to move.

"I was born in Arhus and spent most of my life in public housing and shared houses. Then eight years ago, I decided to move here, because my family all moved to Copenhagen. I wanted to live with others, because, you know, when you're new in a place it can be a bit overwhelming and the older you get it can be harder to make new friends. So I was happy to find a place here. 

"I've been very happy here. I really like Norrebro. I like that it's such a mix of people. I'm very glad to not be, sorry to say it like this, living with a bunch of rich as**oles.

"We found out about the 'ghetto plan' when all the politicians and police came here, but they never spoke to us. They want to sell Mjolnerparken, but there are other "ghettos" in the country where they want to tear down healthy houses just because they don't like the people living there.

"I was a kindergarten teacher. I've dealt a lot with kids that weren't very stimulated, but that has nothing to do with skin colour. You have to use other methods to solve it. All the research will tell you this [plan] won't do anything.

"In the other housing associations where I lived, we had the same [social] problems, but everyone was white. They [the authorities] went in and they gave more opportunities for jobs and that helped.

"I see it [the plan] as something that's harming people, cutting at emotional ties and economically, it's also just a waste of money. That's how it is for people who don't earn a lot, or are sick, or aren't in some way a part of the system.

"People are very sad. I think friendships are going to fall apart, and I think it will expose some vulnerabilities from people who are already struggling, especially if they're told, 'You can't live here because we don't like you.'

"I'm being forcibly relocated. In the seniors' residence, we've been able to get confirmation that we won't be separated as a group. And we're the group that's white. I think that's been part of the reason we're getting different treatment than the others.

"But we still have to pay much higher rent than we can afford. Especially now that I'm getting older, how will I pay for my medicine?

"It's a nightmare. Everyone's so confused about it. It makes me feel unsafe. People are talking about it all the time, even when you go to take the trash out.

"This place is going to be refurbished and they'll sell it for three times the price to rich people. 

"I don't know what a 'parallel society' is. I mean, maybe there are different realities. Maybe it's the rich towns versus here, for example, because they live a completely different reality than we do. I don't think there's any parallel society here."

Asif Mehmood, 52, taxi driver: 'Here, you never sleep hungry, you're never alone'

Asif Mehmood
'They're making us move here and here and there. I feel like they're kicking us out of Denmark,' Asif Mehmood says [Jamila Versi/Al Jazeera]

Asif came to Denmark from Pakistan at the age of 20 and moved to Mjolnerparken with his wife and daughter in 1994. They raised their three daughters there. They have been told they have to leave and have received an offer of new housing.

"I really like Mjolnerparken. Here, you never sleep hungry, you're never alone. If you forget your wallet when you go to the store, someone will let you take the food home, because we know each other here. You can never do that in the city centre. We live in the best place you can be - there's a train station, bus stations. My wife is ill. We live next to three different hospitals, all five minutes away. That makes it very easy.  

"I'm very dependent on people here. If I'm at work and my wife or daughters have a small problem, I can call one of my friends to come help out. It's a huge support network.

"People can call it what they want, but it's not a 'ghetto'. They're [the government] the ones who built this place and now they're starting to call it a 'ghetto'. That's not fair. Now that it's become this hip place, they want people to move out and they use criminality as an excuse.

Then they'll move us out from Copenhagen to the countryside and, eventually, they'll just kick us out of the country.

ASIF MEHMOOD, TAXI DRIVER

"If there's crime, let's fix it. But with this plan, they want to tear down the buildings.

"Just because we all have a different skin colour and wear different clothes doesn't mean we're criminals.

"There are places like Allerod, with much more crime than here, but they don't call it a "ghetto" because they're white. It doesn't make sense.

"Now they want us all to move to Wilders Plads [in Copenhagen] and pay double the rent there. So won't Wilders Plads become a 'ghetto' if all the same people move there? And what about those of us who can't afford double the rent?

"Then they'll move us out from Copenhagen to the countryside and, eventually, they'll just kick us out of the country, like Inger Stojberg [far-right politician and ex-immigration minister] wants. But excuse me, we're 99 percent Danish citizens living here. Even if they don't think we look Danish.

"Now Bo-Vita [the housing association] has been sending us these brochures saying, 'M is so happy, because now that he's moved, he finally has a sofa.' What the hell? You've seen that I have not one but two sofas. They need to find me a place that I can afford and that has an elevator for my wife.

"I'm lucky. I make an OK amount. We've gotten a new housing offer but it's on the other end of town and far from the hospitals. And what about everyone else? They aren't telling us anything. Everyone is very uncertain."

Anonymous, 45: 'We're going to fight to stay'

One 45-year-old woman was interviewed anonymously. She arrived in Denmark as a Palestinian refugee when she was a teenager.  

"I was born in Lebanon in 1974. In 1988 we moved to Denmark. First, we were in the asylum centre, and then we moved to Humlebaek [a coastal town] and lived in our own family home.

"But we didn't like it. My parents were lonely. So we applied to come to Mjolnerparken. First my husband, my new-born and I moved in, then my parents moved in next to us.

"We moved here to be in a social place. We really like being here. My five children grew up here with the other second-generation kids. My oldest child is 25 and the youngest seven. The oldest two have their own business and my daughters are studying public administration. 

"I work in a canteen, but I've applied for an internship in an office instead. I don't really like working in the kitchen. And I'm a carer for my mum. 

"Children can't find work if they live in Mjolnerparken. Lots of kids from outside the area - faces we don't know - come and make problems. Everything is stacked against the boys from around here. They don't feel Danish enough, they're spoken down to, they don't get jobs, so then they have to do something else. 

I felt Danish until recently. Now I feel I'm not a part of this society.

ANONYMOUS

"When we moved here it was peaceful. Then the ethnic Danes moved out and suddenly it [got] a much worse reputation than it is.

"I've lived here 25 years. I think I'd be depressed if I moved from here, because I have so many good memories - bad memories too, of course. It's not good for children to move. Especially if you're forced to do it. 

"I felt Danish until recently. Now I feel I'm not a part of this society. The politicians created their 'parallel society', with the bad reputation they've given Mjolnerparken so that ethnic Danes don't want to live here. It's the fault of the housing association that they moved in so many immigrant families and now they're saying it's a problem.

"But it doesn't make sense. Blocks 1 and 4 aren't being sold, so they will still be a 'ghetto'. But they will be renovated, so some families will probably not come back, because the rent will be more expensive.

You get three new housing offers and if you don't say yes, you don't get any help. But we're not going to apply for offers. We are going to sue either the Copenhagen municipality or the state which is administrating the plan. The lawyers [who are helping us] are figuring that out. We are more than 50 citizens who don't want to move and who will sue. If we fail, I'll know we've tried."

Samiah Qasim, 27, social worker: 'They don't see me as Danish any more'

Samiah Qasim
'Lately I don't feel so safe any more,' Samiah Qasim says [Jamila Versi/Al Jazeera]

Samiah's parents are originally from Palestine. Her immediate family is not having to leave their home, but her parents-in-law are. When her daughter is one, she will have to begin compulsory lessons in "Danish values". Samiah recently organised a "lets ghettogether" party to invite people to come and see Mjolnerparken. 

"I was born and bred in Blagardsgade [also in Norrebro], which is a former 'ghetto'. I've lived in Mjolnerparken for six years with my husband and my two children. His parents live here too. My husband has a master's from Copenhagen Business School.

"I really liked growing up in Blagardsgade. I felt really safe. I was very sceptical about moving to Mjolnerparken because of negative things I had heard from the media, but we needed a place to stay so we took it, and actually, I have become very happy about it.

"There's a good community. You have all the shops and transport you need and there are cheap apartments. The only problem is the gangs. 

"We used to have a gang problem in Blagardsgade, but then came more shops and cafes. It became really cosy and green. Suddenly there was a lot of activity for the boys - clubs and internships and job offers, so they didn't have time to step into the gang area. That made a huge difference. 

"I don't think they can be more wrong about the 'ghetto' laws. Firstly, there's nothing wrong with the buildings which they're selling or tearing down. It's the people that live in those buildings who are struggling. And that's where you need to use the resources to provide support like they did in Blagardsgade and do preventative work.

My daughter is six months old and I just got a letter saying that since I'm from a 'ghetto' area, I have to sign up to send my child to this institution for 25 hours a week to learn 'Danish values'.

SAMIAH QASIM

I feel I have to fight. How can we change this law or even get it removed?

Lately, sometimes, I fear that a crazy person will push me on to the train tracks just because I've got a headscarf, and suddenly they don't see me as Danish any more. It wasn't like that eight years ago. The politicians have just created hate, fear and division, and that's very frightening to witness. 

My daughter is six months old and I just got a letter saying that since I'm from a 'ghetto' area, I have to sign up to send my child to this institution for 25 hours a week to learn 'Danish values'.

If we refuse, we don't get any benefits or child support. The only exception is if the municipality steps in. So if I say my child is not ready at the age of one but will be ready at one year and three months, it becomes society's decision.

This has nothing to do with me as a mother. It is based simply on my address. If I moved over to the other side of the road, I would not be having any of these problems.

I don't feel this law makes us feel included - it's the opposite. You're saying to kids from a young age that they are not good enough, that they have to do extra to be accepted by society.

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and the fearless wimp does nothing...

RCMP say 16,503 people illegally entered Canada’s border in 2019 

The RCMP intercepted 16,503 people illegally crossing into Canada from the U.S.-Canada border in 2019, according to new federal government data.

The number of people entering Canada via the border at unofficial ports of entry declined in 2019, but the total number of people making asylum claims jumped from 55,040 in 2018 to 63,830 according to Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada.

The increase is due to more and more people flying to Canada and then making asylum claims upon arrival at airports across the country.

The Safe Third Country Agreement between America and Canada means asylum seekers are supposed to make refugee claims in the first safe country they enter, but when individuals cross illegally into Canada they are able to bypass the agreement.

https://www.thepostmillennial.com/rcmp-say-16503-people-illegally-entered-canadas-border-in-2019/

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Re Megan and Harry and their son, they are welcome to visit but if they want to become permanent residents , then they are subject to the procedures in place to allow that. No let, no favoritism, just what is done within the act. Mind you swearing allegiance to the crown should not be a problem for them. 

 

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but the total number of people making asylum claims jumped from 55,040 in 2018 to 63,830 according to Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada.

The increase is due to more and more people flying to Canada and then making asylum claims upon arrival at airports across the country.

That is good news.....no more messy travel arrangements to the roxham road land crossing and having to get the RCMP to carry bags...now, our new poor and downtrodden can land at the airport of their choice, hop on an airport shuttle and go straight to the hotels!!

The only people who will be upset are the NYS taxi drivers who were getting the fares from PLB to 

Roxham road.

 

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