Sign in to follow this  
Jaydee

Canadas Immigration Policy Totally Out of Control

Recommended Posts

On 10/18/2019 at 9:15 AM, st27 said:

While police are not describing this break-and-enter spree as crime tourism

Even though that's exactly what it is. 

Think about it for just a moment, people travel from half a world away to the GTA, go on crime sprees and then leave, passing all "after action reports" to the next group to arrive through brokers who take a cut of the proceeds.... and why wouldn't they?

The brokers set these folks up with what they need (lodgings, transportation etc) and coach them on the administrative aspects of "doing crime right in Toronto." Really now, what did you think was going to happen? Enjoy the show...

Edited by Wolfhunter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did Justin anticipate this?  and if so what is in place to help?

Hospital patients in Canada lacking English need access to interpreters, study says

Interpreters trained in medical terminology are more often provided for patients in Canada's larger centres, but a new study says lack of access to interpretation could result in unsafe health care through missed diagnoses and medical errors.

Risks include missed diagnoses, medical errors, research finds

The Canadian Press · Posted: Nov 04, 2019 8:50 AM PT | Last Updated: 7 hours ago
 
shutterstock-huge-file.jpg
The lead author of a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association says patients with a chronic disease and limited English are more likely to return to the emergency room or be readmitted to hospital because of poorer understanding of discharge instructions and not taking medication as required. (Shutterstock)
362
comments

Waking up with worsening pain had Surjit Garcha worried, but the red blisters on her stomach were so alarming that she went to her neighbour's home to try to explain, in her limited English, that she needed help.

Garcha, who lives alone, doesn't have the English skills to call her doctor's office and felt more comfortable going to someone she trusts.

Her neighbour took her to the emergency department in Delta, B.C., where Garcha learned she had shingles, a viral infection that can include complications such as scarring and vision and hearing loss in older adults.

 

Garcha, now 82, said the intense pain was bad enough, but not being able to understand what was wrong with her made her feel even more vulnerable.

"The employees who bring food to patients would leave it outside the door, because they could catch what I had and no visitors could come in my room,'' she said in Punjabi about her experience three years ago.

Garcha's only solace was that a nurse spoke Punjabi, but it wasn't until her daughter arrived from Seattle the next day that she had any contact with a family member.

Interpreters trained in medical terminology are more often provided for patients in Canada's larger centres, but a researcher from the University of Toronto said lack of access to interpretation could potentially result in unsafe health care through missed diagnoses and medical errors, suggesting language services should be a priority.

Dr. Shail Rawal, lead author of a study that includes data from Toronto General and Toronto Western hospitals, said patients with a chronic disease and limited English are more likely to return to the emergency room or be readmitted to hospital because of poorer understanding of discharge instructions and not taking medication as required, compared with those who are proficient in the language and were discharged with similar health concerns.

 
hospital-language-barriers-dr-shail-rawa
Toronto physician and researcher Dr. Shail Rawal is the lead author of a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggesting hospitals across Canada provide professional interpreters for patients with limited English skills. (The General Medicine Inpatient Initiative/Handout via the Canadian Press)

The study was published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association and includes data for all patients discharged from the two hospitals with acute conditions, pneumonia and hip fracture, and chronic conditions heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, between January 2008 and March 2016, amounting to 9,881 patients.

 

"We saw that if you had heart failure and limited English proficiency you were more likely to come back to the emergency room to be reassessed in 30 days after you were discharged,'' said Rawal, an assistant professor in the University of Toronto's department of medicine and a staff physician at the University Health Network, which includes the two hospitals.

"Patients who had limited English proficiency and heart failure or chronic obstructive lung disease were more likely to be readmitted to hospital in the 30 or 90 days after discharge,'' she said.

The quality of care or the level of access to interpretation ... should not vary based on which hospital you happen to present at with your illness.- Dr. Shail Rawal

For those with pneumonia or hip fracture, the data showed no difference in return to hospital regardless of patients' ability to speak English, Rawal said.

"Our thinking is that those are acute conditions that have a pretty standard treatment, whether it be surgery and then rehabilitation or a course of antibiotics, whereas the two chronic conditions require a lot of patient-centred counselling and patient management plans.''

Of the 9,881 patients:

  • 2,336 had limited proficiency in English.
  • Nearly 36 per cent spoke Portuguese.
  • Just over 23 per cent spoke Italian.
  • Cantonese, Mandarin and Chinese were the primary languages for about 14 per cent of patients.
  • Greek and Spanish were the least spoken languages.
  • 18.5 per cent of the study subjects' languages were listed as "other.''

Rawal said patients at the two hospitals have around-the-clock access to interpretation in various languages by phone and in-person interpretation is also available but must be pre-booked and is typically offered during business hours.

"The quality of care or the level of access to interpretation, in my view, should not vary based on which hospital you happen to present at with your illness,'' she said.

"Currently, that is the case, that depending on what hospital you go to in our city, in our province or across the country, you will have varying levels of access to professional interpretation services and I think that in a linguistically diverse country the language needs of patients and families should be met by institutions.''

 
toronto-general-hospital-entrance.jpg
The study included data from Toronto General Hospital. 'The quality of care or the level of access to interpretation, in my view, should not vary based on which hospital you happen to present at with your illness,' said lead author Shail Rawal. (David Donnelly/CBC)

Family members often step in to interpret and alleviate a patient's anxiety but may end up having to rearrange their schedules while waiting for nurses, doctors or specialists to show up at the bedside, Rawal said.

However, she said previous research studies have shown that families are less accurate in their interpretation than professionals and sometimes may not wish to translate what a clinician is saying, perhaps to lessen the impact if the prognosis would be too upsetting.

Kiran Malli, director of provincial language services for the Provincial Health Services Authority in British Columbia, said patients in Vancouver and the surrounding area have access to 180 languages through interpreters who work at hospitals and publicly funded long-term care homes.

The top three languages are Cantonese, Mandarin and Punjabi, Malli said.

In-person and phone interpretation is provided without a pre-booked appointment. The health authority started a pilot project last year to provide services by phone to family doctors' offices, she said.

 
vancouver-general-hospital.jpg
Patients at Vancouver General Hospital and surrounding areas have access to 180 languages through interpreters who work at hospitals and publicly funded long-term care homes. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Another pilot on video-remote interpreting at hospitals, which Malli said would greatly benefit patients needing sign language — which is already being provided — will also start soon and benefit those living in isolated parts of the province.

A few scattered grassroots programs were available in B.C. in the 1990s but the current standardized one didn't start until 2003, she said.

"It was getting pretty evident that we needed to do something a little more than just pulling up any bilingual person or calling on the overhead paging [system] to say 'If anybody speaks Cantonese could you please come to emergency,''' Malli said of the current program's genesis.

"Research shows us that as people get older, even if you know English when you're younger, you tend to revert back to your mother tongue as you age,'' she said, adding elderly people in medical distress tend to forget the English skills they have.

"I do think we are seeing more elderly patients for that reason,'' she said.

It's unfair for health-care staff to expect family members to act as interpreters because, just like English-speaking patients' relatives, their role should be to support their loved ones and not to be burdened further, Malli said.

"If we are looking at equity, as family I should just be there to support my family member through whatever it might be rather than act as their language conduit,"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Marshall said:

Did Justin anticipate this?  and if so what is in place to help?

Do you think he even cares?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And how many new hospitals, doctors, nurses etc is trudeau funding to accommodate the goals of his immigration/family reunification targets?? Most of these newcomers (yup, I said newcomers, as opposed to old stock) head for Toronto,Montreal or Vancouver to an already clogged healthcare system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

France 'takes back control' with non-EU migrant quotas

File pic of a worker weldingImage copyright Getty Images Image caption France currently has strict conditions for employers to take on foreign workers (file pic)

France is to impose quotas on the number of foreign workers from outside the EU, as part of measures aimed at addressing concerns about immigration, asylum and integration.

"We want to take back control of our migration policy," said Prime Minister Edouard Philippe.

Access to medical care will be cut for those who have no right to stay.

Migrant tent camps that have sprung up in areas of north-eastern Paris are to be cleared by the end of the year.

France is one of many European countries that have struggled to respond to an influx of irregular migrants and the government is under pressure to react to the political challenge from the far-right National Rally of Marine Le Pen.

 

What is the situation now?

The number of asylum requests rose by 22% in 2018 to 122,743.

Police stand by before operation at Grande-Synthe on 17 September 2019 Image caption This camp near the French port of Dunkirk was cleared in September amid concerns that migrants were trying to cross the Channel

In a sign that the government was taking a tougher tone on migration, the prime minister said France was not an island and taking back control meant that when France said yes it meant yes, and no really meant no.

Mr Philippe did not openly challenge existing EU asylum rules although he made clear that immigration, along with the environment, had to be priorities for EU institutions and the main incentive was "sovereignty".

"Taking back control of our migration policy means fighting back against abuses of the right of asylum, against irregular migration. Our country will therefore play its part so that Europe rebuilds," he said.

Mr Philippe's reference to taking back control of migrant policy echoed language used by pro-Brexit campaigners ahead of the 2016 UK referendum on leaving the EU.

p07m4fk1.jpg
Media playback is unsupported on your device

The dangers faced by migrants who cross the Channel

Exit player
 
Media captionThe dangers faced by migrants who cross the Channel

He said the government had found a fair balance between "rights and duties" without giving in to populism.

Several European countries have tightened their migrant policies in response to the influx into the EU that reached a peak in 2015.

Greece has seen a recent surge in numbers crossing from Turkey to the Aegean islands and last week parliament in Athens passed new measures aimed at speeding up the asylum process.

Mr Macron's government is considered centrist, drawing from both left and right, and the measures have not met with universal approval. Justice Minister Nicole Belloubet went on national radio on Wednesday to warn that she had "never considered quotas to be the answer".

How the quota system will work

Currently, employers who wish to hire from abroad have to follow a cumbersome system of explaining why a job cannot go to a French citizen.

The government has indicated it will adopt a new approach towards hiring migrant workers from outside the EU, with a view to the policies adopted by Canada and Australia. Australia uses a points-based system that focuses on professional and personal characteristics. Canada does too, with a cap on the number of workers applying for a visa without a job offer.

Labour Minister Muriel Pénicaud said on Tuesday that France had to recruit according to its needs and that quotas would be decided annually, with help from regional governments, job centres and social partners. The current number of migrant workers being offered visas is 33,000.

"We welcome [migrant workers] now, but not necessarily in jobs that are stretched. Conversely there are some jobs that are stretched which cannot be filled," she said.

The quotas will not take into account specific countries and migrant workers will be given a visa for a specific period and a specific job.

Although unemployment at 8.5% is relatively high for Western Europe, it has fallen from the rate of 10% when President Emmanuel Macron came to power in May 2017.

What are the other measures?

Many of the measures focus on migrants who do not have the right to stay in France.

The period of health cover will be reduced from 12 months to six, and those seeking asylum will have to wait three months before they can apply for basic cover.

France is keen to attract bigger numbers of students, doubling the current number to half a million by 2027. The prime minister said France was currently the world's fifth biggest host country for international students and risked losing out to countries such as China.

Rules on family reunions will be unchanged although the government has pledged to combat fraudulent reunions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Marshall said:

"We want to take back control of our migration policy," said Prime Minister Edouard Philippe.

Access to medical care will be cut for those who have no right to stay.

Migrant tent camps that have sprung up in areas of north-eastern Paris are to be cleared by the end of the year.

France is one of many European countries that have struggled to respond to an influx of irregular migrants and the government is under pressure to react to the political challenge....

It always seems (to me) that the backlash is worse than doing it right in the first place and that change is demanded  by the very voters who insisted on creating the problem.

The Second Law of Liberal Dynamics states:

The volume of screaming (racist, xenophobe, etc) is inversely proportional to cost borne by the screamer.  

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My recently developed feeling on the matter is this;

First decide how much money your country can afford to spend on immigrants.  Then figure out how many immigrants your country can successfully integrate per year.  Whichever is the smaller number is the number you take each year.  Then close the loopholes; illegal border crossings, chain migration, etc so that you get the best (most suited) immigrants.   Lots of statements about how we "need" immigrants due to labour shortages - the shortages are not in Toronto, Vancouver or Montreal so then decide where those immigrants will go; Timmins, Thunder Bay, Flin Flon, etc.  You want to immigrate to Canada - fine, you and your family are welcome - in Prince Albert.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, seeker said:

My recently developed feeling on the matter is this;

First decide how much money your country can afford to spend on immigrants.  Then figure out how many immigrants your country can successfully integrate per year.  Whichever is the smaller number is the number you take each year.  Then close the loopholes; illegal border crossings, chain migration, etc so that you get the best (most suited) immigrants.   Lots of statements about how we "need" immigrants due to labour shortages - the shortages are not in Toronto, Vancouver or Montreal so then decide where those immigrants will go; Timmins, Thunder Bay, Flin Flon, etc.  You want to immigrate to Canada - fine, you and your family are welcome - in Prince Albert.

At the same time we need to get serious re our requirements :

1. must be fluent in either of our 2 official languages. (includes family members)

2. Sponsors must be held accountable for the surety that they said they would provide for the immigrants.

3. Jobs (as seeker said, they must be forced to go to where the jobs are.

etc etc etc.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this