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Jaydee

Canadas Immigration Policy Totally Out of Control

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Times have changed....in previous times, people made their own way through traditional skills, farming, construction, etc. Those types of opportunities seem to be lacking. Today, the present government is creating  a problem from a social and fiscal pov that will deeply impact the taxpayers.

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42 minutes ago, Airband said:

 

Quote

A quote from the article.  This increase is partly due to the so-called Canadian Experience Class — a centrepiece of the previous Conservative government's economic immigration reforms, which fast-tracks permanent residency for newcomers who already have work experience in Canada.

I wonder how the Libs will twist this to make themselves look good?  :D

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2 hours ago, Malcolm said:

 

I wonder how the Libs will twist this to make themselves look good?  :D

 

They will find a way.

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As many thought, making it easier to become a citizen did open a door. Let us hope the majority of those who were not eligible under the old rules become actual residents of Canada.

Canadian citizenship applications surge after government relaxes language, residency rules

17,500 applications filed in week after requirements revised, compared with 3,653 in an average week

By Kathleen Harris, CBC NewsPosted: Dec 28, 2017 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Dec 28, 2017 5:00 AM ET

There was a surge in applications for Canadian citizenship after the government relaxed rules around residency and language proficiency. (Craig Edwards/CBC)

There was a spike in applications for Canadian citizenship after the government relaxed the rules around residency requirements and language proficiency this fall.

Figures from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship provided to CBC News show there was an average of 3,653 applications a week in the six months before changed were brought in Oct. 11.

The number shot up to 17,500 applications the week after the new requirements kicked in. There were 12,530 applications submitted the week after that, but data for subsequent weeks is not yet available.

Citizenship applications

"Reducing the physical presence requirement gives more flexibility to applicants to meet the requirements for citizenship and encourages more immigrants to take the path to citizenship," said Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship spokeswoman Nancy Caron. "This helps individuals who have already begun building lives in Canada achieve citizenship faster."

In recent years, there has been an average of 200,000 citizenship applications submitted each year.

Fluctuations in application rates are expected after rule changes, so the department put resources in place to handle "surge capacity" and keep processing times below the 12-month service standard, Caron said.

Andrew Griffith, a former senior immigration official, author and fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, said it's too early to tell if the jump in numbers represents a blip or part of a longer-term trend. But he believes an increased rate of citizenship fosters social cohesion and eases community tensions as immigrants have a deeper connection to the country and to Canadian society.

'Integration journey'

"We want people to become citizens because we believe that's part of the integration journey," he said. "That helps them feel part of Canada and ultimately should improve all the economic, social and political outcomes of the country."

 

The new rules include:

  • The required length of physical presence in Canada is reduced to three out of five years, from four out of six years.
  • A portion of time spent in Canada before permanent resident status will count toward residency requirements, which will give credit to temporary workers and students.
  • The age range for language and knowledge requirements is reduced to 18 to 54 years old, from the previous requirement of 14 to 64.

 

But Griffith said high fees remain a barrier for some to apply for citizenship, especially those in the family reunification or refugee categories with stretched finances.

Processing fee hikes

The processing fee jumped to $630 in 2014-2015, which includes a $100 "right of citizenship" fee. That is still much lower than the fees in the U.K., the U.S. and the Netherlands, but is higher than New Zealand, Germany, Australia and France.

Griffith said reducing costs would reflect the fact that promoting citizenship provides not just personal benefit, but a benefit to the greater Canadian society when people can fully participate, including in the political process.

Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen, who marked the changes taking effect at an event in October, said they will make the path to join the "Canadian family" easier and more flexible.

"As a country that's committed to the settlement and integration of newcomers successfully so they can restart their lives and make contributions to our society, we have to ensure the path to citizenship for permanent residents," he said at the time.

People can be deemed ineligible for Canadian citizenship if they have a criminal record or are facing charges in or outside Canada, or if they have had citizenship refused or revoked in past.

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34 minutes ago, Malcolm said:

so they can restart their lives and make contributions to our society,

Lovely...f/as get requests all the time from passengers to fill out their customs decs for them...they dont understand the language... This card is usually accompanied by their CANADIAN passport!!!

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'Safe zone' for women aims to stop New Year's refugee sex attacks in Berlin

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/12/31/safe-zone-for-women-set-up-at-berlin-new-years-eve-event.html

New Year's Eve celebrations in Berlin will see a "safe zone" for women for the first time in the city's history. Organizers of the Brandenburg Gate party are hoping to prevent mob attacks similar to those that occurred in Cologne two years ago. Hundreds of women were attacked by gangs of men with migrant backgrounds during New Year's Eve celebrations in 2015.

The incident happened after Germany had accepted a record influx of more than one million migrants.

The German capital will this year have a "safety zone" where Red Cross helpers will look after women who feel harassed or threatened.

Additional safety precautions, including a ban on large bags, rucksacks, glass bottles and alcoholic drinks, will also be enforced.

COLD PUTS SOME NEW YEAR'S EVENTS ON ICE

Berlin police have issued advice to women attending the celebrations, encouraging them to seek help if they feel threatened and to avoid carrying a valuable bag.

About 500 security personnel will be at the Brandenburg Gate party, as well as more than 1,000 extra police officers patrolling the city.

Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to turn out for the celebrations.

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I see the Police in Berlin are concerned that by establishing a "Safe Zone" it could in the future lead to baning women from mixing with males.  Of course what we are seeing in Europe and sadly creeping into Canada is a complete culture gap regarding women in general and in particular how they should be treated by men. 

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OMG, and we thought our present Federal Government could not learn , apparently they have. ;)

 

After Trump pulls protected status for 200,000 Salvadorans, Canada says: Please don’t come here

 
‎Today, ‎January ‎10, ‎2018, ‏‎3 hours ago | Washington Post

OTTAWA – When the Trump administration issued an immigration ban on citizens of seven majority Muslim countries a year ago, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sent out an unambiguous tweet about Canada’s stance on refugees and asylum seekers.

“To those fleeing persecution, terror and war, Canadians will welcome you, regardless of your faith. Diversity is our strength,” Trudeau wrote on Jan. 28.

But when U.S. Homeland Security announced this week that it was withdrawing Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for 200,000 Salvadorans, giving them 18 months to sort out their immigration status permanently or face deportation, the reaction from the Canadian government was more muted.

Fearing an influx of newcomers crossing “irregularly” into Canada from the United States, the Canadian government has embarked on an information campaign to discourage Salvadorans from trekking north, as thousands of Haitians did when threatened with a loss of protected status last summer.

Pablo Rodriguez is heading to Los Angeles this week for a pre-emptive strike against misinformation about Canada’s immigration system circulating in the Spanish-language press that officials worry could inspire a new wave of asylum seekers.

The government announced that it was planning to send Pablo Rodriguez, a Spanish-speaking member of Parliament, to California in the coming days to speak to community groups, lawyers and Spanish-language media. His message is simple: If you don’t qualify for refugee or asylum status, don’t try to cross into Canada.

“Canada has a robust and structured immigration system that must be respected,” Argentina-born Rodriguez told La Presse newspaper in a French-language interview. “Before leaving your job, pulling your child from school and selling your house to come to Canada, make sure you understand the rules and the laws. Because if you don’t fill these criteria, chances are you’ll be returned, not to the U.S. but to your native country.”

The government also says there are plans for a “targeted digital campaign” aimed at TPS-affected communities.

Last summer, when rumors swirled through the Haitian community that they were going to lose the TPS designation in place since the 2010 Haiti earthquake (the designation was lifted in November), a wave of Haitians headed to the Canadian border. As many as 250 people a day crossed “irregularly” along a rural road in upstate New York into neighboring Quebec, prompting a crisis of sorts, with authorities forced to put a temporary tent encampment at the border and house migrants at Montreal’s Olympic stadium.

Following an outreach program to the Haitian community in places like Miami, the influx of migrants has slowed. Only 60 or so migrants now cross into the country in Quebec per day and most of those crossing are from Nigeria, not Haiti, according to Scott Bardsley, spokesman for Canadian Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale.

Hursh Jaswal, an aide to Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen, said that while those migrants needing protection will be allowed to stay, the others will be removed. He noted that only 8 per cent of completed asylum claims made by Haitians who entered Canada over the past year were accepted. The vast majority of claimants are still awaiting a hearing.

In a news conference Tuesday, Hussen said the government was not expecting a surge of Salvadorans but has plans in place just in case.

“We are not being complacent,” he said. “We are making sure we are prepared for any eventuality, including a future influx of asylum seekers crossing our border irregularly and, in that regard, we are using the lessons that we learned in the summer to do so.”

Under the terms of the Canada-U. S. Safe Third Country Agreement, most migrants are required to request refugee protection in the first safe country they arrive in. For many migrants crossing into Canada from the United States, that means they are legally blocked from entering Canada at a regular border point. But if they cross “irregularly” through the undefended frontier, they are arrested but can immediately make a refugee claim. After undergoing a security check, they can stay in the country until they get a hearing.

Refugee claimants can work and receive health care while waiting for their hearings. According to the Canadian Broadcasting Corp., 14,467 people crossed into Canada outside legal border points in the first nine months of 2017, with half coming from Haiti.

Angela Ventura, spokeswoman for the El Salvador Association of Windsor, Ontario, said she has already been getting calls from Salvadorans living in the United States, anxious to know whether they should come to Canada if they’re forced to leave the United States.

“I advise them to do it legally, not illegally,” said Ventura, a paralegal by training who has been in Canada for 28 years.

She said she has pleaded with the Canadian government to consider allowing these Salvadorans to come to Canada not simply as refugees.

“They have been in the U.S. for 17 or 18 years. They are reliable workers with mortgages,” she said. “If somebody has a small business in California, why not allow them to establish a small business in Canada?”

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“She said she has pleaded with the Canadian government to consider allowing these Salvadorans to come to Canada not simply as refugees.

“They have been in the U.S. for 17 or 18 years. They are reliable workers with mortgages,” she said. “If somebody has a small business in California, why not allow them to establish a small business in Canada?”

As soon as somebody mentions Salvadoran, why I am I cringing? Oh yeah, a small cultural entity known as MS 13.....check it out. 

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31 minutes ago, st27 said:

“She said she has pleaded with the Canadian government to consider allowing these Salvadorans to come to Canada not simply as refugees.

“They have been in the U.S. for 17 or 18 years. They are reliable workers with mortgages,” she said. “If somebody has a small business in California, why not allow them to establish a small business in Canada?”

As soon as somebody mentions Salvadoran, why I am I cringing? Oh yeah, a small cultural entity known as MS 13.....check it out. 

Pretty wide brush you are painting with.

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"There is no question that Canadian authorities are concerned about the worst gang elements from Central America migrating north and escaping some of the heat down here," Mr. Morales said.

That comment was from 8 years ago.....how many Canadians have heard of this gang??   they are here, we do not need more problems.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/canada-is-a-haven-to-gangsters-on-the-run/article18441715/

 

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You’re right Boestar....didn’t mean to imply it was just the Salvadorans that have a criminal element....there are the Nigerians and the Somalis too.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/shadowy-black-axe-group-leaves-trail-of-tattered-lives/article27244946/

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/why-so-many-somali-canadians-who-go-west-end-up-dead/article4365992/

Haitians....nuff said.

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Yep ... but Justin would have his gullible idolizers believe diversity is somehow a proven national strength while unity of purpose etc. remains the  past realm of ideologically challenged know-nothing Canadians.

 

 

 

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Again... We have been letting these immigrants in for decades at the rate of about 200,000 a year.  Doesn't matter which government is in power.

 

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3 hours ago, boestar said:

Again... We have been letting these immigrants in for decades at the rate of about 200,000 a year.  Doesn't matter which government is in power.

 

but the Libs have upped the ante 

Canadian government wants 310,000 immigrants in 2018, 340,000 a ...  

The federal government is aiming to bring a total of 310,000 newcomers to Canada in 2018, it was revealed on Wednesday, with increases every year thereafter until 2020.

The plan reflects a new multi-year approach to immigration planning that experts say will allow for better preparation and integration.

By 2020, the yearly total will hit 340,000.

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1 hour ago, st27 said:

That might be true Boestar but the nationalities/culture/values aren’t the same as the past.

Kind of highlights the subtle differences in how leadership in US & Canada view their immigration policies:

“Why are we having all these people from sh¡thole countries come here?”

Edited by Airband

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Whether it's this new 200000 + strong wave of refugees, or the 300000 + 'immigrants' Trudeau plans to bring in during 2018, the numbers need to be considered in context; population increases of this magnitude are equivalent to adding a new city from the size of London to Quebec City to Canada this year and for who knows how long thereafter.

No matter where one stands on the issue, It's time for everyone to get involved because reality says language, competency and lack of demand will severely limit the new arrivals ability to positively participate in the Canadian economy. Iow's, meaningful employment will not be available to the arriving immigrants & refugees for years to come, if ever.

Correct me if you think my contention is somehow flawed, but I understand the facts to mean Trudeau expects taxpayers to 'work' and give up the fruits of their labour to provide for millions of people who can reasonably be expected to remain fully dependant on government aid and oversight, possibly for entire lifetimes.

 

http://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/windsor-could-see-immigrant-wave-after-trump-ends-protected-status-for-salvadorans

 

 

Edited by DEFCON

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Not a citizen, served 4 years for various crimes including "aggravated assault" and now his lawyer is asking that he be allowed to remain in Canada (with evidently support from our PM)

Abdoul Abdi to be set free, but his fight to stay in Canada isn't over

Former child refugee from Somalia has been detained on immigration grounds since Jan. 4

By Emma Smith, CBC NewsPosted: Jan 15, 2018 2:35 PM AT Last Updated: Jan 15, 2018 2:35 PM AT

Abdoul Abdi's lawyer said the decision to release his client was made at a detention review hearing on Monday. (Robert Guertin/CBC)

A former child refugee from Somalia at risk of being deported will soon be set free, but his fight to stay in Canada isn't over.

Abdoul Abdi, who spent the last week and a half detained on immigration grounds in jails in the Maritimes and Ontario after serving a four-year prison sentence, could be released as early as tomorrow, according to his lawyer, Ben Perryman.

On Monday, an Immigration and Refugee Board member ordered that Abdi be released from immigration detention and transferred to a halfway house in Toronto.

"For Mr. Abdi it means that he can have his liberty back," said Perryman. "Our position all along was that this detention has been both unlawful and unnecessary, and that it's deprived Mr. Abdi of his liberty."

The federal government wants Abdi sent back to Somalia because of his criminal past and the fact he's not a Canadian citizen. 

The 23-year-old arrived in Nova Scotia at the age of six with his aunts and sister, and was put in the care of the Department of Community Services, which never applied for citizenship on his behalf.

The difference between the hearing Monday and Abdi's first detention hearing last week is that representatives of Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale agreed with his release, said Perryman.

But Canada still wants him sent back to Somalia, he said.

"So we are still in the same position we were before, it's just that Mr. Abdi doesn't have to be in jail while that battle continues."

In an email to CBC News, a spokesperson for Goodale's department said it won't comment on specific cases due to privacy and that Canada's immigration system "has a robust assessment process and multiple safeguards."

Abdi was supposed to go to a halfway house when he got out of prison on Jan. 4 after serving about four years for crimes that included aggravated assault.

Perryman continues to fight Abdi's deportation in Federal Court.

Fatouma Abdi, Abdi's sister, has been fighting to have her brother stay in Canada where he's spent most of his life. (Robert Guertin/CBC)

Abdi's case has continued to receive national attention, and both Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil have expressed concern.

Perryman said what he finds "unfathomable" is that even with this support the deportation process continues. 

"If the highest leaders in our land at the federal and provincial level are signalling that, then there needs to be a response from Minister Goodale to end what Mr. Abdi is experiencing, and do the just thing, and I would say the moral thing, and the thing that many Canadians across the country are calling for," he said.

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