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Jaydee

Canadas Immigration Policy Totally Out of Control

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More of what I fear is Trudeau/Hussein’s grand scheme for the future of Canada. This interview was with a British MP who has has first hand experience with the European migrant issue....and she speaks out against the UN compact ... a good backgrounder. Gets to the real impacts around the :24 min mark.

 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4KA_SzIc1DA#

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On 11/30/2018 at 10:23 AM, Jaydee said:

 

The answer should be obvious....

781391E6-C44D-49C8-A2F0-0FB4B4141B29.jpeg

Yeah.  It is obvious that this clueless individual has done ZERO research and doesn't have a clue.

 

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Trudeau's goal is to become the first North American Secretary-General of the UN.  Everything he's doing here in the backwoods of Canada is simply padding his resume and he'll spend as much of your money and trample on as much of your future as it takes to get there.

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So let’s get this straight....the way to save the world is to NOT have kids, Don’t Drive, walk everywhere, Never go on a vacation, use Green energy which is horribly expensive and totally unreliable. The only things I can actually afford to do is buy lightbulbs which apparently means diddly squat.

Just what exactly are we trying to save? It certainly isn’t living...no family, no fun, walk everywhere and eat vegetables for the rest of my life. Seems like an agonizingly slow death by a thousand cuts if you follow the Trudeau crowd.

Screw that **bleep**...I prefer to go out with the next Big Bang...at least I will have “lived” until my last breath.

 

https://phys.org/news/2017-07-effective-individual-tackle-climate-discussed.html

 

 

163231BA-55F9-4A38-B78C-9BDA67F9CFF9.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee

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I agree Jaydee.....every time I start my boat, with its 2 x 8.1 litre gas engines, I smile and think of Trudeau and Climate Barbie, and open another beer. 🌴🌴🌴🍺🍺🍺

The Danish government seems to be taking the right approach, imo. This will send a message to their migrant population.

https://nationalpost.com/news/world/danes-plan-to-detain-foreign-criminals-on-deserted-island

I think we have more than enough suitable locations to host a population.

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10 hours ago, seeker said:

Trudeau's goal is to become the first North American Secretary-General of the UN.

Take him NOW

 

  • Thanks 1

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Just spit balling here..........but....if the turd signs on to the UN compact on migrants/migration, would the migrants who wandered in at Roxham rd be given a free pass. It would allow the turd to claim he has solved Canada’s refugee crisis.

on the downside, he would piss off all those who are legally waiting to enter the country through legal immigration channels.

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1 hour ago, st27 said:

Just spit balling here..........but....if the turd signs on to the UN compact on migrants/migration, would the migrants who wandered in at Roxham rd be given a free pass. It would allow the turd to claim he has solved Canada’s refugee crisis.

on the downside, he would piss off all those who are legally waiting to enter the country through legal immigration channels.

Seems to me they have already been given a free pass. 

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This Compact gives migrants the right to migrate, the right to health care, etc. and even though “non-binding”, gives a reference for judges to base decisions on since the country has signed and agreed in principle to the compact.

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John Ivison: The UN’s global pact on migration sounds nice — but don’t sign it

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎5, ‎2018, ‏‎4 hours ago | John Ivison

The late Christopher Hitchens called conspiracy theories the “exhaust fumes of democracy” — the unavoidable result of large amounts of information circulating among a large number of people.

The latest conjectural haze drifting in from the fringes of the political spectrum is that the United Nations’ agreement on migration, which Canada is set to sign in Morocco next week, will see this country lose control of its borders.

The Rebel’s Ezra Levant called the UN’s global compact on migration “dangerous” — “a done deal cooked up by unelected bureaucrats with no regard for national sovereignty.”

Andrew Scheer, the Conservative leader, said his party strongly opposes Justin Trudeau’s plan to sign Canada onto the compact, saying it will open the doors to foreign bureaucrats to direct immigration policy. He was specifically concerned about an objective in the compact that deals with how media report on migration issues. The section calls for an effort to eliminate “all forms of discrimination” in public discourse about migration issues — which, if enforceable, would be an existential threat to The Rebel.

After question period on Wednesday, Scheer asked for unanimous consent for a statement that urged the government not to sign the compact and which blamed the UN for the torrent of refugees that has crossed into Canada from the U.S. Not surprisingly, he did not get it.

For now at least, Scheer’s fears are overdone. The potential limitations on media reporting, for example, are not enforceable. Chris Alexander, a former Conservative immigration minister, pointed out that the compact is a political declaration, not a legally binding treaty. “It has no impact on our sovereignty,” he wrote on Twitter.

spain_migrants.jpg?w=640

Migrants sit on the deck of the Nuestra Madre de Loreto, a Spanish fishing vessel, as it carryied 12 migrants rescued off the coast of Libya on Friday, Nov. 30, 2018.

Trudeau made the same point on Wednesday, as he boasted about Canada’s “global leadership” and its adoption of “open policy.”

It’s hard to find anything particularly offensive in the compact — it says refugees and migrants are entitled to universal human rights; that countries should improve co-operation on international migration to save lives and keep migrants out of harm’s way. It is explicit that it is not legally binding and the sovereign rights of states to determine their own migration policy is re-affirmed.

Still, I remain unconvinced that Canada should sign on. The compact also says that states should “determine their legislative and policy measures for the implementation of the global compact.” The very act of signing creates an expectation that the signatories will take action. It’s not nothing.

We have heard in the past about UN declarations being merely “aspirational.” As it turned out, they have become much more than that.

Take the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which was also sold as a non-binding, aspirational document.

When it was introduced in 2006, the Harper government opposed the declaration’s 46 articles, on the practical grounds that previous court decisions had referenced the work of UN bodies and used them to interpret the laws of Canada. One article in the draft version could have been interpreted to mean military activities could not take place on land that had traditionally been Aboriginal.

The late Jim Prentice, who was then Indian Affairs minister, said the declaration was inconsistent with Canadian law and refused to sign. The declaration only received the Canadian government’s unqualified support in 2016 under the Trudeau government. The new prime minister had already agreed to “fully adopt and implement” the UN declaration, even though his justice minister, Jody Wilson-Raybould, called it “unworkable” and a “political distraction.”

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Justic Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould rises during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, Nov.1, 2018.

Whatever your views on the declaration, it is beyond dispute that it is not merely an “aspirational document.”

In fact, it is now the law, after NDP MP Romeo Saganash’s private members’ bill was passed by the House of Commons last May. The bill required that Canada’s laws be consistent with the declaration.

In the coming months and years, legislation and judicial interpretation will determine whether Canada’s existing jurisprudence on the duty to consult is sufficient to meet the UN declaration’s requirement on the need to secure “free, prior and informed consent” in any given area of policy. Critics argue that the passage into law of the declaration gives Indigenous Canadians rights not enjoyed by other Canadians.

What was presented as a nice thing to do to be onside with a global consensus has now evolved into a situation that could yet result in legislative gridlock, if the declaration’s provisions on the “rights of self-determination” are taken at face value.

The global compact’s intentions may be pure, but there will be consequences to its adoption that could over time impact Canada’s ability to set its own course on migration.

It won’t erase the border but it could erode sovereignty on immigration. You don’t have to inhale the exhaust fumes of the online conspiracy theories to believe that signing the UN global compact on migration is not a great idea.

jivison@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/IvisonJ

NP_Top_Stories?d=yIl2AUoC8zA NP_Top_Stories?i=SHbTo6cnwEY:XMz5TGrArZU:V_sGLiPBpWU NP_Top_Stories?i=SHbTo6cnwEY:XMz5TGrArZU:F7zBnMyn0Lo NP_Top_Stories?d=qj6IDK7rITs NP_Top_Stories?i=SHbTo6cnwEY:XMz5TGrArZU:gIN9vFwOqvQ

 

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Italy walks out on UN migration meeting saying national borders are no business of the UN

ITALY’S leaders are BOYCOTTING a controversial United Nations meeting set to make CRITICISING MIGRATION a criminal offence.

 

Italian prime minister Giuseppe Conte said decisions over migration were a matter for national governments.

He said: “Italy reserves the right to adhere to this document or not only after the parliament has decided.”

In a statement on behalf of the Italian government he said: "The migration pact is a document that deals with issues and questions our citizens are concerned by.

"For this reason, we think it advisable to task parliament with a debate and the final choice once talks have concluded.”

Mr Conte’s announcement came minutes after anti-immigration interior minister Matteo Salvini had spoken against going to the UN meeting.

Mr Salvini said: “The Italian government won’t go to Marrakech, it won’t sign anything, parliament will.”

 

https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1053045/italy-news-giuseppe-conte-UN-global-compact-for-migration-Marrakech

 

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Given the turds idealistic views on the world, the Syrian refugees, the open border at Roxham road, the intention of signing the compact on migration (not immigration), ...... at what point will he ever say no to people entering the country? When will enough be enough?

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13 minutes ago, st27 said:

When will enough be enough?

When Canadians finally wake up and he gets voted into oblivion!

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The Vote count just keeps growing.....

“ UN asks Canada to resettle more refugees displaced in Horn of Africa.”

 

The United Nations refugee agency is asking Canada to resettle more refugees from the Horn of Africa, emphasizing the needs of particularly vulnerable Somalis displaced by a decades-long conflict in the war-torn country.

Mohamed Abdi Affey, the special envoy of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees for the Horn of Africa, is in Ottawa this week to brief parliamentarians and senior government officials on the protracted refugee crisis in the East African region. He said the more than one million Somali refugees in the area – many of whom have lived in the Kenya’s massive Dadaab refugee camp for as long as 27 years – cannot be forgotten as the world is distracted by other crises.

“The Somalia refugee crisis risks being forgotten as a crisis because of global competing attention for other emergency situations in Syria, in Yemen, in South Sudan,” Mr. Affey said in an interview with The Globe and Mail Wednesday. “Part of my role has been to refocus attention and seek solutions.”

One of the UNHCR’s proposed solutions is asking countries like Canada to accept more Somali refugees, particularly the most vulnerable, such as those with medical emergencies and single mothers. Mr. Affey took that request directly to Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen, who came to Canada as a Somali refugee when he was a teenager.

“The minister has graciously welcomed the idea that as a country Canada continues to lead in this effort and that we are hoping in the years ahead … the numbers will continue to improve,” Mr. Affey said, describing his meeting with the minister this week. Mr. Hussen did not respond to The Globe’s request for an interview.

Somalia has been engulfed in a civil war since 1991 when the military regime of then-president Siad Barre was overthrown. The conflict, compounded by drought and other natural disasters in the East African country, has created one of the longest-running refugee crises in world. Meanwhile, more than 2.6 million people are displaced within Somalia itself, according to the UNHCR.

The UNHCR’s representative to Canada, Jean-Nicolas Beuze, said his agency will not tell the government how many Somali refugees it should resettle, but underlined the overwhelming global need as the world faces an unprecedented refugee crisis. Of the 25.4 million refugees worldwide, the UNHCR says less than 1 per cent will be resettled to a third country such as Canada.

Canada has seen a steady increase in the number of asylum claims from Somalia over the past five years, according to statistics from the federal Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB). In 2013, 257 Somali refugee claims were referred to the IRB and 90 were approved; those numbers gradually climbed to 771 referred claims and 317 approvals in 2017.

Between January and June of this year, the IRB saw 286 Somali refugee claims and approved 207 cases; more recent statistics were unavailable. Somali asylum claims are on track to account for a small portion of the 43,000 refugees the federal government plans to resettle this year.

Beyond resettling more Somali refugees, Mr. Affey also encouraged the Canadian government to continue investing foreign-aid dollars in the Horn of Africa − Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea and Djibouti – and other surrounding countries hosting Somali refugees, such as Kenya and Yemen. For instance, he said investments in educational opportunities for refugees – particularly vulnerable girls – are critical for the stability of the region.”

 

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-un-asks-canada-to-resettle-more-refugees-displaced-in-horn-of-africa/

Edited by Jaydee

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At the risk of repeating myself to the point of annoyance, refugees from Somalia require a lot of post arrival support due to large differences in culture and life experience. I see this as the biggest single failing of silly Liberals who scream racist at every turn but then abandon these folks on arrival and leave them to fend for themselves in places like Toronto (which is my personal definition of racism at its most appalling).  

I support the notion that it is better to help people where they live and to work toward setting conditions in their homeland that help them to prosper and live peacefully. That notion simply doesn't resonate with most liberals and won't until they get on an airplane and actually go there themselves. At present, there are some 68 million displaced refugees in the world so bringing them all to Canada is simply a non starter. Maybe it's like gun crime in that it needs more than band-aid thinking.  

Edited by Wolfhunter

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The problem would be resolvable if only the people were 'encouraged' to follow strict birth control practices.

 

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43 minutes ago, DEFCON said:

The problem would be resolvable if only the people were 'encouraged' to follow strict birth control practices.

 

What would those be based on? 

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Those volunteering in the Tijuana refugee camps reported that there is a significant number of single women with children in the caravan and the overt discrimination against them is a source of personal trauma for those denied any alternative.

Which brought me back to the question posed by the young migrants. What about Canada? Was there a role for us to play in alleviating this humanitarian outrage?

Answering this question is important. This is happening in North America. It involves our North American free-trade agreement (now United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement) partners. And it has implications for Canada’s ability to be a leader in our own hemisphere on one of the most significant human security issues that cries out for action and solutions. The movement of forcefully displaced persons, driven by conflict, violence and environmental degradation, is a test of how well responsible governments can show a skeptical public that they can handle difficult but not unmanageable problems.

Quote

The minister of immigration has rightly asserted that Canada will sign on to the UN Compacts on Migration and Refugees and that they are important foundations for a renewed commitment by members of the international community to a fair, effective and just system to handle the growing numbers of people displaced by the pernicious actions of others.

Canadian leadership in meeting this tragedy on our doorstep would be a welcome, tangible demonstration of how the compacts can be a springboard for direct action and lead to improved collaboration on migration and refugees issues. It would be a counter to the negative stance of too many political players who exploit public emotions through misleading narratives on refugees. And, it would give tangible meaning to the Canadian focus on the plight of women and children, offering a timely sign to those in the Tijuana camp that help may be on the way.

 

 

Yup, it’s a non-binding agreement but it will open the doors for a lot of queue jumpers.....too bad for bona fide immigrants who went through the process with skills Canada needs. And there are some who will say there is room for everybody. And so it starts....

btw... the quotes were from an opinion piece in the Globe from non other than Lloyd Axworthy.....couldn’t get the link to work.

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1 hour ago, DEFCON said:

If that's a question it's not clear enough to address?

Yes def. a question. To make it plainer:

Who would set the "strict birth control" limits, penalties?  Who would the limits apply to? Who would enforce them.... etc etc etc.   The trouble is and always will be in the details.

 

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December 12, 2018 5:59 pm

Roxham Road residents near Canada-U.S. border to be paid for asylum seeker disruption

By The Canadian Press
News: Trudeau says conversations with provinces about asylum seekers has been 'very constructive'x
 

Following Friday's first ministers' meeting, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he had "very constructive" conversations with provinces including Quebec about asylum seekers.

 
 

 

 
 
X
 

 

-A A +
 

Quebecers living by the Canada-United States border where thousands of migrants have crossed irregularly into the country since 2017 will be eligible for payments of up to $25,000, the federal government announced Wednesday.

Life along the previously sleepy Roxham Road — the main entry point for migrants entering the country on foot — has been disturbed, and residents deserve to be compensated, Border Security Minister Bill Blair said.

READ MORE: Quebec says Ottawa owes it $300 million for costs related to influx of asylum seekers

“I’ve been there. I’ve spoken to the residents. I’ve seen the level of activity of the RCMP, the Canada Border Services Agency and other officials that has impacted what is otherwise a quiet, rural road,” Blair told reporters.

Roughly 96 per cent of all migrants who have crossed illegally into Canada since 2017 have done so at Roxham Road.

WATCH BELOW: Canada spent $166 million dealing with asylum seekers

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The federal Immigration Department says 16,000 people crossed the Canada-U.S. border illegally into Quebec through the end of October this year, and about 19,000 did last year.

Bureaucrats divided the Roxham Road area into three zones based on proximity to the border. People living in the closest zone are eligible to receive up to $25,000, those in the next closest $10,000, and those in the third zone $2,500.

READ MORE: More than half of Quebec asylum seekers had some kind of ‘legal status’ in U.S. before crossing to Canada

A spokesperson for Blair could not say Wednesday how much the compensation will cost Ottawa.

Conservative party Leader Andrew Scheer said in the House of Commons he worries irregular crossings will become a permanent problem.

“The prime minister needs to stop asking others to pay for his failures,” Scheer said.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responded by stating Ottawa is investing $173 million to improve border security as well as to decrease the time it takes to process asylum seekers claims.

 

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Here's a clip from 2010 that sends a very clear message that all Westerners should heed.

This clip makes it quite obvious that the global migrations and the UN plan behind them is the creation of many Western leaders who have an agenda that clearly runs contrary to your own family planning.

 

 

 

  

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Botched handling of gangster refugee claimant exposes Canada's screening weaknesses

Canada's handling of a refugee claimant's case exposes cracks in our immigration screening process, an expert says.
 

Rare but growing problem needs to be addressed, expert says

 
charles-rusnell.jpeg
Charles Rusnell · CBC News · Posted: Dec 13, 2018 5:00 AM MT | Last Updated: 3 hours ago
 
abdullahi-hashi-farah.JPG
Abdullahi Hashi Farah had an extensive criminal record, ties to a violent gang, and a long history of breaching probation. But Canadian immigration officials still released him after he crossed illegally into Canada in October 2017.

Abdullahi Hashi Farah's candid confession about his gangster past clearly impressed the Immigration and Refugee Board officer who presided over his first detention hearing on Nov. 1, 2017.

Caught while crossing the border illegally near Emerson, Man., the 27-year-old Somali citizen readily told the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officers he had an extensive criminal record, had been a Somali Outlaws gang member in Minneapolis, and was fleeing an arrest warrant for parole violation.

Farah, however, insisted he had only been a gang member for two years, and had quit the criminal life eight years earlier.

At the detention hearing, the CBSA strongly recommended Farah be detained a few more days until it received his full criminal record from the U.S.

But Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) member Trent Cook clearly placed more weight on Farah's admission about his background than the agency's suspicion about the degree of his criminality.

"One of the biggest factors that play in your particular situation is your character," Cook said.

"In my estimation, you are probably one of the most honest detainees that I have ever come across," he said, noting Farah had acted "contrary" to his own interests by offering up his criminal history and gang ties.

"What this indicates to me is that your are, based on your character and behaviour, very likely to pursue all of your immigration matters in Canada with the same diligence and honesty as you have demonstrated in your interview."

Had Cook heeded the CBSA recommendation, had he waited to obtain his entire U.S. criminal record, he would have learned Farah used eight aliases, two different birth dates, and had convictions in four states, including a felony gun conviction.

 

But he didn't heed the CBSA, and after a Federal Court judge denied the agency's challenge of Cook's decision the next day, Farah was released in Winnipeg.

Arrested in Edmonton

Seven months later, on June 11, 2018, Edmonton police arrested Farah in a Walmart parking lot in northeast Edmonton. Overdosing and beaten badly from two previous fights, he struggled with police and paramedics before becoming unresponsive.

Nearby, police found a dumped getaway car that had been used in a string of armed convenience store robberies. Farah became a suspect when a CBSA officer in Winnipeg picked him out of robbery photos taken from security camera footage.

Police won't say why Farah is no longer a suspect in the armed robberies. But he remains in the Edmonton Remand Centre awaiting deportation to Somalia, after exhausting all legal avenues to stay in the country.

Calgary criminologist Kelly Sundberg says almost all immigrants are law-abiding, but the Canada Border Services Agency can't properly identify and monitor the outliers. (Sam Martin/CBC News)Mount Royal University criminologist and associate professor Kelly Sundberg said Farah clearly slipped through the cracks of the immigration screening process, something he said is becoming more common. "This case is indicative of what we could see in similar cases in Vancouver or Calgary, Toronto — across our country," said Sundberg, a former CBSA officer whose research focuses on immigration enforcement and border security. Sundberg said the IRB must adhere to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and err on the side of releasing immigrants rather than detaining them for months. But he said there is a disconnect. CBSA enforcement is seriously under-resourced, he said, which results in insufficient initial investigations and subsequent monitoring of people like Farah."I don't think this case is an indication that we have to curtail our immigration numbers," Sundberg stressed. "I think this is a very small percentage of the overall population of non-citizens seeking entry and coming into our country each year."It still requires important attention. But this isn't a cause for public fear or angst."The IRB declined an interview request. In an emailed statement, it said "the IRB is a tribunal and, like the courts, our practice is to let members' decisions speak for themselves."Evidence of criminal activity on cellphone During a two-month investigation of Farah's case, CBC News reviewed hundreds of pages of police, court, parole, and immigration records, and conducted interviews with U.S. police and immigration officials. The investigation revealed that:Just six days after Farah was first released, he breached his conditions and was subsequently rearrested.That same day, Nov. 8, 2017, the CBSA gained access to Farah's cell phone. It contained recent photos and videos of Farah playing with a loaded handgun, doing cocaine, concealing cocaine, and flashing wads of cash. There were also front-and-back photos of a credit card that wasn't his.Farah was on parole when the photos were taken, and was prohibited from possessing a firearm.The phone also contained Tinder chats, photos of Farah having sex with women, and photos of women in various stages of nudity.There was no evidence of homosexual activity. Farah's asylum claim was based on his contention that as a gay Muslim, he would be killed if he was deported to Somalia.The IRB again released Farah on March 14, 2018. The hearing transcript doesn't mention the damning phone report.The CBSA declined an interview request so it is not known why the phone report was not immediately entered into the IRB hearing process. In an emailed statement, the CBSA said only that all relevant documentation and evidence had been entered into Farah's admissibility hearing.American court, police, and FBI records show Farah's criminal record, and his gang membership, was far more extensive and serious than he had disclosed. Farah had wilfully refused to abide by release conditions for years. CBC News found at least 30 instances in which Farah breached immigration release and parole conditions in the U.S. He failed to abide by his release conditions in Canada several more times. Farah was to have been a key witness against his own gang in a major sex-trafficking case in Nashville, Tenn., that involved girls as young as 12. But he reneged and was imprisoned for contempt of court and obstruction of justice.Farah told CBSA and IRB officials he refused to testify because he had been assaulted and his family had been threatened. The judge in his contempt case found no evidence to support those claims and court records show Farah lied repeatedly.Co-operating witness' in sex-trafficking case

Retired Homeland Security agent Tony Langeland burst out laughing when he was read the statement about Farah being one of the most honest detainees the IRB officer had ever encountered.

"I had a lot of interaction with him," Langeland said, stifling a laugh. "He is definitely not the most honest person I have ever met.

"But he is a criminal and he is involved in a whole lot of **bleep**."

Retired Homeland Security agent Tony Langeland, Farah’s handler for two years in the U.S., says Farah should never have been released. Langeland was Farah's handler for more than two years in Nashville after he became a "co-operating witness" in the sex-trafficking case.He describes Farah as a self-serving liar and recalcitrant criminal. "He is manipulative," Langeland said of Farah, who he also knew by his gang name, Grey Goose. "He is never, never going to go beyond what is best for him in any circumstance."During 28 years in immigration enforcement, Langeland has had extensive dealings with gangs, including Somali gangs. The photos on Farah's cellphone, he said, are clear evidence he never gave up the gang life."Those are the kinds of pictures we see all the time on gang members' phones," he said, adding it is normal for gangsters to take photos of sex, guns, drugs, and cash because that is their everyday life, and that is how they document their "street cred."Gang life: guns, bulletproof vestsFarah's family moved from civil-war-torn Somalia to a Kenyan refugee camp in 1990, the same year Farah was born. In 2000, the family emigrated to the U.S., eventually settling in Minneapolis, although Farah shuttled back and forth to Nashville after his parents split up.Farah testified in one American court case that he joined the Somali Outlaws in south Minneapolis when he was 13 or 14. He told CBSA officers a different story. He said he was a member for two years when he was 18 and 19, and the gang was just a bunch of guys from his neighbourhood hanging out. Court records show Farah was definitely more than a wayward teen.At a Nov. 1, 2017, detention hearing, an immigration official praised Farah’s honesty about his criminal past and ordered him released. (Sam Martin/CBC News)While still a juvenile, Farah and three other gang members were stopped by police in Minneapolis. Officers found a gun in the car and all four were wearing bulletproof vests."When they're doing that, they're looking to either get into it with another gang or do an armed robbery," Langeland said.Farah's rap sheet reflects his chosen criminal trade."He was a safe cracker by his own admission; he liked to work alone," Langeland said.Farah broke into houses or businesses, stole safes and then figured out how to open them. From age 16 on, Farah racked up charges and convictions for possession of burglary tools, lurking with intent, theft, and receiving stolen property. At age 18, he was convicted and jailed for burglary, his first felony. At 19, he was charged in south Minneapolis with possession of a prohibited handgun.Police records show three shots were fired from a .40-calibre Smith & Wesson semi-automatic outside the home of a rival MurdrBoys gang member."(Farah) fired the shots as a show of disrespect in trying to scare them," the police file states. 'Deportable alien' Farah's criminality finally caught up to him. He was arrested by immigration authorities as a "deportable alien." He lost his permanent residency and was to be deported to Somalia as soon as the country stabilized. Then the U.S. district attorney's office made him an offer. By February 2010, in return for restricted freedom, he was working for prosecutors and police in Nashville with Langeland as his handler. Farah was a valuable asset to the prosecution of gangsters because, as he once testified, "I was in some good ranks in the gang to know almost everything."Langeland said Farah had agreed to testify against gang members who were moving girls from state to state for prostitution, and where they were moving them to, with "specific dates and times of places that the girls had been as far as hotels and things like that were concerned."In October 2017, Farah entered Canada illegally by walking across the border near Emerson, Man. (CBC News archive) But when it came time to testify, Farah reneged, was convicted of contempt of court and obstruction of justice, and was imprisoned for 15 months.After he got out on parole, he repeatedly breached his release conditions. He failed drug tests, got busted for drunk driving, and refused to report to his probation officer.Farah was given repeated chances. Finally, a nationwide warrant was issued for his arrest and deportation on Oct. 23, 2017. Four days later, he crossed illegally into Manitoba.eleased again in Canada, breaches conditionsCanadian immigration and court records show Farah continued to flout release conditions.As a condition of his Nov. 2, 2017 release, his lawyer had arranged for him to live in Winnipeg with a fellow Somali immigrant. But six days later he didn't report to the CBSA office and wasn't living where he was supposed to be when they checked. Rearrested, he was sent back to jail in Winnipeg. A  few weeks later the CBSA issued a deportation order for Farah based on "serious criminality."Under the immigration act, a detention hearing must be held every month.At the March 14, 2018, hearing, a family friend from Somalia, now a Canadian citizen, offered to fly Farah to Calgary, post a $2,000 cash bond, give him a place to live, and provide close supervision. After he was released in November 2017, Farah breached conditions and was re-arrested. But the Immigration and Refugee Board again released him. (CBC News archive)"I don't think that the alternative (to continued incarceration) that has been proposed is a perfect one but alternatives to detention don't have to be perfect," hearing officer Marc Tessler said. "They need to be ones that reduce the likelihood of not appearing for removal to an acceptable level of risk, and I think that in this situation it is precisely that.I believe that he doesn't want to be back in custody and he understands that he needs to comply with conditions to the letter."Farah flew to Calgary on March 22, 2018. Reached by phone in Calgary, the family friend spoke on condition that he not be identified. He said he fears Farah's friends. The friend confirmed he forfeited the $2,000 bond, a hardship because he has a large family to support.Farah, he said, used to visit him at his business every time he reported to the CBSA office. But after a couple months, he disappeared. The friend reported him missing to Calgary police."After that we find him on the Facebook, and he said, 'No, I am not missing, I just went with my girlfriend.' But I don't know the girlfriend's number or anything."Farah failed to report to the CBSA office on June 11, the same day he was arrested near the dumped getaway car in northeast Edmonton. IRB officer acknowledges credulityThe CBSA didn't learn where Farah was until June 14. An Edmonton police detective told the agency Farah was in a downtown hospital. He had a broken jaw and was awaiting surgery. The CBSA officer who attended the hospital said Farah had been sedated and tied to his gurney using "soft restraints" because he was acting aggressively toward hospital staff. Farah’s extensive criminal record included two felony convictions for burglary, and possessing a handgun when prohibited. Farah claimed he had been kidnapped for ransom and brought against his will to Edmonton, a story he insisted was true at a later IRB hearing.fter CBC News recently began making inquiries, the IRB invited a reporter to teleconference in to Farah's next detention hearing. The hearing officer was Trent Cook, the same officer who had first released Farah after praising his honesty and character.Cook acknowledged his previous credulity. "You present very well, you're articulate, you're somewhat educated, people are inclined to believe you when you make your representations," Cook told Farah."But the actions that you have demonstrated while on release hold a lot more weight, in my view, than your words and your promises. Because you haven't been capable of following conditions in the past, I simply don't have faith that you're going to be able to do so in the future."More than a year after he illegally entered the country, Farah's last hope of staying in Canada ended on Nov. 16, 2018. A Federal Court judge agreed with a previous IRB ruling that Farah hadn't provided sufficient evidence of his sexual orientation, or that he would be persecuted or harmed in his native Somalia. Farah did not respond to an interview request made through his lawyer. He is not expected to be deported to Somalia until at least February. But Canada's immigration system may not be done with him yet.Farah told an IRB hearing he has hired a U.S. lawyer to try to get his felony convictions expunged. "I won't be inadmissible anymore," he said. "So I can come back."

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