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Jaydee

Canadas Immigration Policy Totally Out of Control

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“ The Trudeau government’s plan to bring in close to one million new immigrants within the next three years should be of serious concern to Canadians. Next year alone, the numbers are expected to reach 310,000 but to that total must be added approximately 900,000 temporary foreign workers and foreign students who will be living in Canada. Since most of the newcomers will be settling in three of our major cities, the pressure on infrastructure and local services will be extreme.

Canada’s current immigration policy is based on myths. All of our political parties, most of the news media, big business interests, the banks and land developers favour large-scale immigration and justify this on the grounds that immigration helps our economy, strengthens the labour force and alleviates our aging problem.

In fact, only about 15 to 17 per cent of the annual flow consists of immigrants selected because they have skills, education and experience. Because of the pressure to get high numbers, few of these workers are seen or interviewed by visa officers. The selection is done by a paper review. The remainder of the movement is made up of the spouses and children accompanying the workers, family members sponsored by relatives in Canada, immigrants selected by the provinces (who do not have to meet federal selection criteria ), refugees and humanitarian cases.

The truth is that the government has lost control of the immigration program by abandoning its traditional role of selecting our immigrants and controlling their numbers. Canadians have been brainwashed into believing we are doomed if we don’t keep immigration levels high. We are also told that our immigration policies are acknowledged to be the envy of the world. These arguments are wrong.

There is no evidence that immigration is essential for economic growth. The 1985 MacDonald Royal Commission Report concluded that immigration did not contribute to economic growth and, in fact, caused a decline in per capita income and real wages. In 1989, a two-year study by the Department of Health and Welfare supported the MacDonald report and stated there was no argument for increased population growth and that immigration was not the answer to the aging of the population. In 1991, the Economic Council of Canada reached the same concLesion A more recent study by Prof. Herbert Grubel of Simon Fraser University and economist Patrick Grady found that in the year 2002 alone, the costs in services and benefits received by the 2.5 million immigrants between 1990 and 2002 exceeded the taxes paid by these immigrants by $23 billion. It is not surprising that this study has received little media coverage in Canada.

Studies outside of Canada have come to the same conclusion about the economic value of immigration. In Britain, a report by the House of Lords in 2008 warned that the government’s plan to admit 190,000 immigrants per year would achieve little benefit and would seriously affect the availability of housing and the quality of public services. The report also criticized the government for misleading the people by justifying immigration levels when they provided no economic benefit, were not needed to fill labour shortages and did not help the state’s pension fund.

Perhaps the most insidious argument still being advanced by government and other advocates of mass immigration is the belief that we need immigration to provide the workers needed to replace our aging population. This argument is obviously flawed if, as in Canada, the immigration movement has a similar age structure as the receiving country; then, immigration does not help the aging problem – indeed it may well exacerbate it.

In 2009, a study by the C.D. Howe Institute found that to offset our declining birth rate and maintain the ratio of five taxpayers to support the benefits of one pensioner until 2050, our immigration levels would have to reach 165.4 million. And in that single year, 2050, the annual movement would have to be seven million immigrants. The study recommended that raising the retirement age to 67 would be much more effective.

Sadly, we have allowed our political parties to use and exploit immigration for political purposes – with all parties competing for the ethnic vote by calling for increasing numbers. This is a cynical approach, patronizing to immigrants and damaging to the country. It is time for comprehensive reform.

James Bissett is former head of Canada’s immigration service  (1985-1990).

 

 

 

http://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/columnists/bissett-immigration-policy-is-out-of-control-and-needs-an-overhaul

Edited by Jaydee

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While I’m not inviting (nor participating) in a lengthy discussion/debate on abortion, it is noteworthy that we kill off about 100,000 of our own citizens every year whilst rushing to import people who don’t even like us. Morality and religious concerns aside, from a purely pragmatic perspective, I think you have to go back to about 400 AD Rome to draw any parallels with that type of logic.

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As if our health care system wasn't already under enough strain, with a shortage of beds and doctors....oh yeah, that's a provincial worry. And governments, both federally and provincially are doing so much to encourage doctors to stay or establish them selves here. I've already had to deal with a "specialist" at our local hospital. Couldn't understand him and his bedside manner was not a North American standard.

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Canada has brought in around 200,000+ immigrants EVERY year for decades. we are still here

 

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We have to stop them before they cross the border and this is why.

November 20, 2017 7:36 pm

Canada can’t deport illegal foreigners as countries are refusing to take them

By Staff Agence France-Presse

Early Sunday morning, February 26, 2017, eight migrants from Somalia cross into Canada illegally from the United States by walking down this train track into the town of Emerson, Man.,

 

Canada’s attempts to send up to 1,000 foreigners who are here illegally back to their home countries are being stymied by nations refusing to take them back, officials said Monday.

International and domestic laws in most countries require governments to allow their own citizens entry.

READ MORE: Is Canada’s reputation as a safe haven for refugees deserved?“But some countries are refusing to provide travel documents to their citizens or are just outright refusing to take them back,” Scott Bardsley, spokesman for Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale, told AFP.

He declined to name the “recalcitrant nations,” saying this might upend diplomatic efforts to convince them to change their position on the deportations.

READ MORE: U.S. ending temporary permits for nearly 60,000 Haitians, putting Canada on alert

According to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the current backlog of foreign nationals facing deportation from Canada tops 15,000.

This is down from 20,000 just a few years ago, while the total number of deportations each year has also fallen dramatically from 19,000 in 2012 to 7,300 in 2016.

The removal list includes rejected refugee claimants and persons deemed inadmissible because of a criminal background or because they pose a national security threat.

READ MORE: Canada deporting fewer people for terrorism, war crimes, crime

Proponents of the US way of publicly naming uncooperative countries and in some cases imposing sanctions on them say Canada should follow suit, but others worry this would stigmatize all members of that group.

“The CBSA continues to engage countries to try to obtain travel documents to facilitate the removal of foreign nationals to their home countries,” Bardsley said.

China, India, the United States, Nigeria, Haiti, Pakistan, Mexico, Somalia, Cuba and Jamaica are the top countries of origin on Canada’s deportation list.

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If you look closely you will see what is wrong with how we are dealing with illegal immigrants.  Seems it is the "Sunny" way to set up a tent and invite them over instead of blocking their access.

Decision on Haitians’ status in U.S. has Canada bracing for new wave of asylum seekers

 
‎Today, ‎November ‎21, ‎2017, ‏‎4 hours ago | The Canadian Press

OTTAWA — A decision by the Trump administration to end a temporary residency permit program that has allowed almost 60,000 Haitians to live and work in the United States has the Canadian government on alert for a potential new surge of asylum seekers at the border.

The Homeland Security Department said late Monday that conditions in Haiti have improved significantly, so the benefit will be extended one last time — until July 2019 — to give Haitians time to prepare to return home.

Haitians were placed on notice earlier this year, and, few months later, waves of people began crossing illegally into Canada from the U.S. to claim asylum, catching the Liberals off guard when the crowds began to number more than 200 people a day.

asylum_seekers_aug-_6_lineup.jpg?w=640&h

A long line of asylum seekers wait to illegally cross the Canada/U.S. border near Champlain, N.Y., on Aug. 6, 2017.

A spokesperson for Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen said while Canada remains an “open and welcoming country to people seeking refuge,” anyone entering Canada must do so “through the proper channels.”

“Entering irregularly is not a ‘free ticket’ into Canada,’ ” said Hursh Jaswal late Monday.

“There are rigorous rules to be followed and the same robust assessment process applies. Those who are determined to be genuinely at risk, are welcomed. Those who are determined not to be in need of Canada’s protection, are removed.”

“We’re following it very carefully,” Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said, adding the physical apparatus required for the RCMP and border guards to deal with an influx is in place, as are contingency plans for a variety of “what-if” scenarios.

The surge this summer prompted an outreach campaign to Haitian communities in the U.S. to counter misinformation about Canada’s immigration program circulating through social and traditional media channels and blamed for some of the new arrivals.

ralph_goodale.jpg?w=640&h=480

The physical apparatus required for the RCMP and border guards to deal with an influx of illegal migrants is in place, says Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale, seen at briefing on Oct. 5, 2017.

The misinformation — and the government campaign to counter it — continue.

Liberal MP Emmanuel Dubourg said that the recent announcement that Canada will accept close to one million immigrants over the next three years ended up as a story in the Haitian press about Canada opening its doors to a million immigrants this year. It was framed as proof Haitians were welcome.

Dubourg said he called the paper two weeks ago to clear things up but not before he realized the story had been shared hundreds of times on Facebook.

He said there is a great deal of uncertainty in the Haitian community, but the message needs to get out that Canada isn’t necessarily a default option. He’ll be taking that to New York on Tuesday in his second trip to the U.S. for outreach purposes.

asylum_seekers_border_march.jpg?w=640&h=

RCMP officers look over to the United States on March 28, 2017, at a point in the border near Hemmingford, Que., where many asylum seekers have been crossing.

“I’m there to inform them: be careful before you make a decision,” he said in an interview Monday.

Dubourg, who is Haitian, will also be trying to clear up a misconception that asylum is simple to obtain in Canada.

He said statistics he has seen suggest the acceptance rate for Haitians who arrived over the summer now sits at 10 per cent, down from about 50 per cent previously. The Immigration and Refugee Board was unable to immediately confirm that number.

About 437,000 people live legally in the United States with what’s known as temporary protected status, meaning they can’t be deported back to their home countries because it is unsafe.

The U.S. extended temporary protected status to Haitians after the 2010 earthquake, as did Canada, but Ottawa resumed deportations there this year. Some 262,000 Salvadorans are also awaiting word of a decision on their status, as it’s set to expire in March.

The Liberals have been reaching out to the Hispanic community, too.

Liberal MPs Pablo Rodriguez and Randy Boissonault travelled to Miami and New York late last week and over the weekend as both speak Spanish.

“We have upcoming MP-led outreach trips to New York, Texas and California where we will continue to clear up misconceptions circulating about Canada’s system,” said Jaswal.

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4 hours ago, st27 said:

Boestar....do you really think health care is getting better in Ontario, especially in Yz? 

Dunno.  Never mentioned healthcare.  It's not getting any worse though.

 

 

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and of course let us also not forget that some "Foreign Cultures" are poisonous, at least according to our POV

Quote

Bounty Offered For Beheadings Of Bollywood Director Sanjay Leela Bhansali, Actress Deepika Padukone
By MUNEEZA NAQVI, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. 8 hours ago
Didier Baverel/WireImage
A member of India’s Hindu nationalist ruling party offered 100 million rupees ($1.5 million) to anyone who beheads the lead actress and the director of an unreleased Bollywood film “Padmavati” rumoured to depict a relationship between a Hindu queen and a Muslim ruler.

Suraj Pal Amu, a Bharatiya Janata Party leader from the northern state of Haryana, offered the bounty against actress Deepika Padukone and filmmaker Sanjay Leela Bhansali on Sunday. The film’s producers postponed the release of the film, which was set to be in theaters Dec. 1, and Amu was reported by local media to have said at a public rally that the film would not be allowed to be released at all.

Padukone pulled out of an event in the Indian city of Hyderabad, to be attended by Ivanka Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, after a member of his governing party issued the bounty to behead the actress amid rumour-fueled outrage over the new film.

“Padmavati” is based on a 16th century Sufi epic poem, “Padmavati”, in which a brave and beautiful Rajput queen chose to kill herself rather than be captured by the Muslim sultan of Delhi, Allaudin Khilji. Over centuries of its retelling, the epic has come to be seen as history, despite little evidence.

Padukone plays Padmini, the legendary queen who committed “jauhar,” the medieval Rajput practice in which female royals walked into funeral fires to embrace death over the dishonour of being taken captive.

“Padmavati” has been in trouble since the beginning of the year, with fringe groups in the western state of Rajasthan attacking the film’s set, threatening to burn down theaters that show it and even physically attacking Bhansali in January.

Most of the anger appears to stem from allegations that Bhansali filmed a romantic dream sequence between the protagonists, which Bhansali has denied.

Earlier this month, the head of the Rajput Karni Sena in Rajasthan said Padukone should have her nose cut — a symbol of public humiliation — for being part of a film that allegedly insulted the famed queen.

India’s 1.3 billion-strong democracy is the largest in the world and has made great economic strides, but its politics are held hostage by a complex mix of religion and caste. Books and movies have been banned or received threats of violence because they either offend one religious or caste group, or are deemed offensive to Indian culture in general.

Hollywood movies are routinely scrubbed of sex scenes, and India’s film censor board rejected “Fifty Shades of Grey”. “The Da Vinci Code” was banned in Goa state, which has a large Christian population.

In 2014, the publishing house Penguin India pulled from shelves and destroyed all copies of American historian “Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus: An Alternative History” after a Hindu right-wing group protested, mainly because they said the book described Hindu mythological texts as fictional.

Salman Rushdie’s “The Satanic Verses” has been banned since 1998, since many Muslims consider it blasphemous. The Indian-born Rushdie was forced to cancel a 2012 appearance at the Jaipur Literary Festival amid protests and threats by prominent Muslim clerics.

 

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6 hours ago, boestar said:

Dunno.  Never mentioned healthcare.  It's not getting any worse though.

 

 

When was the last time you visited an emergency department?

Edited by Jaydee

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2 months ago for a broken toe and sprained ankle.  no issues.  Also had to get EMS response for someone else.  Excellent response and support in the ER.

 

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56 minutes ago, boestar said:

2 months ago for a broken toe and sprained ankle.  no issues.  Also had to get EMS response for someone else.  Excellent response and support in the ER.

 

Consider yourself fortunate then, as that’s not the case everywhere. I know of a case where an elderly lady had to spend close to 3 days on a stretcher in a hallway in emerg because there were no beds available in the hospital.

To be more accurate, Ontario doesn’t have a hospital space problem, it has a hospital funding problem. Entire wards are left empty because the Liberal government withholds funding for beds. A hospital could have 300 beds but if they are only funded for say 250, the other 50 remain empty. Meanwhile in the same hospitals, emergency departments have every possible sq’ of hall space littered with patients on stretchers.

Another huge problem that is downloaded on to hospitals is the extreme lack of affordable space in nursing homes. Entire wards are filled to the brims with elderly people who are basically well enough to leave but have no place to go. 

The Liberal Wynne government thinks it’s smart to shell out $1100 per day = $33,000/mth  = $396,000/yr  for acute care beds in hospitals rather than provide nursing home facilities for a mere fraction of that cost.

Our government at work :head:

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/seniors-in-hospital-beds-costly-for-health-system-1.1069802

Edited by Jaydee

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I am still unsure what this has to do with immigration policy.

The Canadian (and World) economy is based on Growth.  I have said this before.  Canadians are not reproducing at a rate significant enough to meet the need for growth.  I believe that umber is around 2.1 kids per family.  Problem is the number of family units is decreasing and for the ones that remain the birth rate is like 1.6.  

This is where immigration comes in.  in order to fill the void left by people not reproducing we need to take them from elsewhere.  Since the 1950s that number has been north of 100,000 /year and up to over 250,000 per year on occasion.  These are the regular joe, wants to move to Canada People that go through the process.  We also service Refugees from other countries and ALWAYS have.  Historically those numbers were relatively low.  Recent world events have caused that number to increase dramatically.  So now we augment that immigration trhough regular channels with refugees.  Not much changes.  A minor spike in numbers in the grans scheme of things.

The media wants you believe it is a huge issue and a major crisis but it is really business as usual as far as the number are concerned.

 

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1 hour ago, boestar said:

I am still unsure what this has to do with immigration policy.

Sorry...:D classic case of thread drift 

Edited by Jaydee

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14 hours ago, Jaydee said:

When was the last time you visited an emergency department?

I spent a few years as a volunteer in Emerg.  The major problem I saw was those people who came to Emeg rather than going to their local walk in clinic. Their presence impeded access for those who truly needed emergency treatment.  Hang nails, tooth aches, minor cuts etc do not warrant a visit to the Emergency Department. 

You may find the following for Alberta to be of interest. http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/about/Page3166.aspx

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Open your wallets folks...Liberals have totally lost it now !

 

Liberals to scrap policy that rejects sick, disabled immigrants.

 

Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen says current provision doesn't align with Canadian values of inclusion :head: :head:

 

‘Canada is committed to ditching a policy that rejects immigrants because they're sick or disabled and could be a drag on the health system, Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen says.

Calling it an "important and sensitive" issue, Hussen said the government will look at all options to revamp the 40-year-old policy, which bars entry to applicants when they could be costly to public health or social service systems.

"From a principled perspective, the current excessive demand provision policy simply does not align with our country's values of inclusion of person with disabilities in Canadian society," he said during an appearance at the House of Commons immigration committee Wednesday.”

 

 

 

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/hussen-immigration-medical-disability-1.4414274

Edited by Jaydee

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There are about 300,000 folks on TPS in the US. Sanctuary cities should standby for heavy traffic; what you have seen so far is just the warmup. Growth is easy... the Romans were big on growth through immigration toward the end too

Edited by Wolfhunter

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Interesting re which groups are being given refugee status vs those who are not.

Canada grants refugee status in about 60% of migrant cases

 

Hundreds of migrants are illegally crossing the US border into Canada each day

Over half of the migrant asylum claims heard by Canadian refugee officials this year have been successful.

New figures released by the federal Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) show that of 1,572 claims heard so far, 941 have been granted.

The IRB has a backlog of 12,895 cases currently pending.

Canada has seen a spike recent months of migrants crossing illegally into the country via the US and making asylum claims.

The new figures look at claims received by the IRB from "irregular border crossers" between February and October of this year.

Those made by migrants from Syria, Eritrea, Yemen, Sudan, Djibouti and Turkey were the most likely to be accepted.

The IRB data confirms that Haitians are by far the biggest group of asylum seekers, filing 6,304 claims with the refugee board over that period.

However, of the small number of claims by Haitians processed so far, 298, only about 10% have been accepted. Failed claimants face removal to Haiti.

The IRB notes that the new figures represent a small sample - 1,572 of 14,467 total claims - and that "caution should be exercised in drawing conclusions regarding trends".

The Canadian Press reported that PM Justin Trudeau said on Thursday that Canada's refugee system is not meant for those merely seeking a better economic future but for those not being protected by their home country.

Many Haitians had been living in the US for years but chose to seek asylum in Canada due to fears of deportation.

The Trump administration hinted in May it would terminate a programme that gives over 50,000 Haitians in the US protection.

It was officially scrapped this week.

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On 2017-11-22 at 7:31 AM, boestar said:

2 months ago for a broken toe and sprained ankle.  no issues.  Also had to get EMS response for someone else.  Excellent response and support in the ER.

 

Another great example of Ontario health care.

 

http://www.ntd.tv/2017/11/27/nurse-told-er-patient-to-lie-down-on-floor-hospital-issues-statement/

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just like airline incidents these are rare but get all the press.  no one publishes feel good stories anymore.  my experience with our healthcare system has not been like this.  while sometimes I do have to wait for service, I understand that when it is busy things get behind.  Not every visit can be tagged to 15 minutes. 

If you want quicker service in the ER call an ambulance to take you there.

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51 minutes ago, boestar said:

just like airline incidents these are rare but get all the press.  no one publishes feel good stories anymore.  my experience with our healthcare system has not been like this.  while sometimes I do have to wait for service, I understand that when it is busy things get behind.  Not every visit can be tagged to 15 minutes. 

If you want quicker service in the ER call an ambulance to take you there.

Some more coverage of the event.

 

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/man-told-i-have-had-enough-of-you-asking-for-help-during-emergency-room-wait

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"Many people will argue that low income among immigrants is due to discrimination against newcomers and fraying social safety nets. But it is also due to insufficient language skills, poorer credentials (even if they seem good on paper), and the lack of social networks and local knowledge of a culture that take years to establish. As the economy becomes increasingly knowledge-based, it takes immigrants a long time to catch up. Meanwhile, in the short term, a heavy influx of newcomers creates new demands for housing, schools and social services that are a strain on the system. But it's not polite to say those things, and so people don't."

"Poverty is rising among immigrants at a time when poverty rates for native-born Canadians have been declining," said a recent piece in Policy Options, co-authored by University of British Columbia economist W. Craig Riddell and two others. Their article is a balanced appraisal of the economic impacts of immigration."

Second-generation immigrants do well," the authors write, "… but the initial impact of a large increase in immigration should be expected to be an increase in taxes, a decrease in service, an increase in deficits, or some combination of the three."

 

The decline in health care services is just one part of the impact of increased immigration. As mentioned, housing will be another, with Toronto and Vancouver being ground zero. How will refugees/migrants find housing in the most expensive markets in Canada

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/the-talk-canada-needs-are-we-importing-inequality/article37098625/

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