Sign in to follow this  
Jaydee

The Future of Motorcycles

Recommended Posts

Yeah, here's another one.  I couldn't watch the whole thing - some designer going on about self-balancing, self-driving motorcycles of the future.  First he says that driving a motorcycle will be one of the great analog experiences of the future but then gets into his vision that the bikes will be so safe that riders will not wear helmets because there will be no need of them and riding gear will be for fashion only!  I'm sure the bike will be perfect - right up until you encounter some loose gravel at the apex or a moose runs out on the road and then it will pitch you head first (and helmetless) into a rock cut or light standard.  Furthermore, even if the bike was able to stay upright and in control in any conditions (which takes away the joy of riding) you still need a helmet and riding gear to handle a wasp off your forehead at 100 km/hr or even raindrops.

  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wondering with that first offering.....what happens at a traffic light?? Do you put your foot down like Fred Flintstone...and do you have to call a tow truck if you screw up and lay it down?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just buy a bloody car.  The exhilaration of riding a bike is the wind in your face.  Why would you build a shell around it?  As for self driving....To heck with that.  Again part of the experience it actually riding the bloody thing.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The following will be of interest to all and in particular the stats re motorcycles in Ontario.

 
November 23, 2017 7:34 am
Updated: November 23, 2017 7:35 am

Alberta had second-lowest collision frequency rate in Canada: study

img_1074.jpg?quality=60&strip=all&w=40&h By Christa Dao Reporter  Global News
2017-11-23T14-07-35.733Z--1280x720.jpg?w=670&quality=70&strip=all

WATCH: Allstate Canada released its annual Safe Driving Study for 2017. Jenna Freeman takes a look at how Alberta drivers did, and how Calgary compares to other cities.

 

A new study released by Allstate Canada finds that the number of car crashes in Canada are on the rise.

Despite that, the insurance company found that Alberta had the second-lowest collision frequency rate, behind New Brunswick.

Over the span of two years, Allstate Canada compared data gathered from vehicles insured with the company for its annual Safe Driving Study.

READ MORE: Ontario motorcyclists 3 times more likely to be injured in a collision than those in cars: study

When comparing cities, Calgary ranked 56 out of 93 communities, with a collision frequency rate of 6.04 per cent.

Red Deer drivers had more crashes, ranking in 62nd place, followed by Edmonton which took 65th spot at 6.4 per cent.

Overall though, Alberta is home to three of the top 10 safest cities in the country.

Spruce Grove ranked second overall with a frequency rate of 3.79 per cent, followed by Lethbridge at 3.86 per cent.

Medicine Hat took fifth spot at 3.99 per cent.

The community with the lowest collision frequency rate was Hanmer in northern Ontario at 3.65 per cent.

For a third consecutive year, Halifax drivers had the highest collision frequency rates at 7.9 per cent. Ajax, Ont., followed closely with 7.77 per cent.

The study also found that the most severe collisions were attributed to incidents involving pedestrians and cyclists. The second-most severe type of collision was head-on collisions.

“These results show there is still a lot of work to be done to help reduce collisions, especially as we head into what is typically the most dangerous driving season of the year,” David MacInnis, product operations at Allstate Insurance Company of Canada  said in a news release.

“We find it troubling that our 2017 Safe Driving Study is showing an overall increase in collisions, especially as the most severe collisions are involving cyclists and pedestrians.”

The report looked at Allstate Canadian customers in Alberta, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Ontario.

https://globalnews.ca/news/3876779/alberta-had-second-lowest-collision-frequency-rate-in-canada-study/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Really?  I had no idea.  Pretty sure this comparison applies to ALL jurisdictions.  you are 100% more likely to sustain injuries on a motorcycle than in a car.  I dont even need a study for that. 

Cars have seat belts, air bags, crumple zones and a big steel cage wrapped around the occupants.  motorcycles have none of that (airbags if you ride a top of the line Goldwing).

What they fail to mention is that in ontario  65% of the accidents involving a motorcycle, the motorcycle was doing nothing wrong.  However the Motorcyclist will get pinned with the blame.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, boestar said:

Really?  I had no idea.  Pretty sure this comparison applies to ALL jurisdictions.  you are 100% more likely to sustain injuries on a motorcycle than in a car.  I dont even need a study for that. 

Cars have seat belts, air bags, crumple zones and a big steel cage wrapped around the occupants.  motorcycles have none of that (airbags if you ride a top of the line Goldwing).

What they fail to mention is that in ontario  65% of the accidents involving a motorcycle, the motorcycle was doing nothing wrong.  However the Motorcyclist will get pinned with the blame.

 

Study not needed but I would bet the cost has been added to your next year's premium.  :D

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this