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Malcolm

Yet another home grown attack against civilians. LAS

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Las Vegas shooting: At least 58 dead at Mandalay Bay Hotel

At least 58 people have been killed and hundreds injured in a mass shooting at a Las Vegas concert.

A gunman, named as 64-year-old Nevada resident Stephen Paddock, opened fire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel towards an open-air music festival attended by 22,000.

He killed himself as police stormed the room where 10 guns were found.

Investigators have found no link to international terrorism, despite a claim from so-called Islamic State.

In an address from the White House, President Donald Trump described the attack as "pure evil".

He praised the efforts of the emergency services, saying their "miraculous" speed saved lives, and announced he would be visiting Las Vegas on Wednesday.

How did the attack unfold?

The final shows of the three-day Route 91 country music festival were in full swing when the gunman struck.

Thousands were enjoying a performance by top-billing singer Jason Aldean when the first of several bursts of automatic gunfire rang out - hundreds of shots, witnesses say. That was late on Monday night - 22:08 local time (05:08 GMT on Monday).

Hundreds of concert-goers scrambled for cover, flattening themselves against the ground, rushing for the exits or helping others to escape as Paddock sprayed the site from his high vantage point.

People at concert duck behind barrier and take coverImage copyright Getty Images Image caption Hundreds of concert-goers fled the scene or ducked for cover amid heavy gunfire

"One man had blood all over him and that's when I knew something was seriously wrong," Mike Thompson from London, told the BBC.

"People were running and there was chaos."

Las Vegas city map showing location of hotel from where gunman shot at least 50 people dead at a country music concert, 2 October 2017

Concert-goer Mike McGarry, who survived, told Reuters he lay on top of his children when the shots rang out.

"They're 20, I'm 53. I lived a good life," he said.

Many hotels on the Las Vegas strip close to the scene were placed on police lockdown and parts of Las Vegas Boulevard were shut.

Aldean, who was rushed off-stage, shared his reaction on Instagram.

"Tonight has been beyond horrific," he wrote.

Las Vegas police say the number of people injured stands at 515.

What do we know of the gunman?

Suspected gunman - undated imageImage copyright Paddock family Image caption Suspected gunman Stephen Paddock - undated image

Stephen Paddock, from a community of senior citizens in the small town of Mesquite north-east of Las Vegas, booked into the hotel on 28 September, police say.

His motives for carrying out the deadliest mass shooting in recent US history remain a mystery. Some investigators have suggested psychological issues, but there is no confirmation of this.

His brother, Eric, is dumbfounded that he acted this way.

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Eric Paddock says he is in total shock after police named his brother, Stephen, as the shooter

Las Vegas Sheriff Joe Lombardo described the shooting as a "lone wolf" attack.

"We have no idea what his belief system was," he said.

So-called Islamic State (IS) has claimed to be behind the attack, saying that Paddock had converted to Islam some months ago.

But the group provided no evidence for this and has made unsubstantiated claims in the past.

FBI Special Agent Aaron Rouse told a news conference: "We have determined at this point no connection to an international terrorist organisation."

IS's claim of responsibility for the Las Vegas attack is very unusual in that the perpetrator's profile does not fit that of supporters or "soldiers" that the group has claimed in the past, writes Mina al-Lami, who monitors jihadist groups for the BBC.

If true, his suicide would be deemed wholly "un-Islamic", she adds.

Jihadist suicides involve the assailant blowing himself up in order to kill those around him.

A couple, wearing country music hats, cower together at the scene of a shooting at musical festivalImage copyright Getty Images Image caption A couple at the concert take cover after gunfire was heard at country music festival

The investigation continues to gather pace, with searches at Paddocks' Mesquite home, where more weapons were found, and a second property.

Paddock lived in Mesquite with Marilou Danley. Police have interviewed her but say she does not appear to have been involved as she was out of the country. They are hoping to speak to her again.

Police say he used some of her identity documents to check in to the Mandalay Bay.

Who are the victims?

The authorities have yet to confirm the identities of any of the 58 killed.

Jordan McIldoon, 23, from British Columbia in Canada, has been identified as a victim of the attack by CBC News.

A nurse, Sonny Melton, of Big Sandy, Tennessee, has been named as another victim by The Jackson Sun newspaper.

In a Facebook post, his wife, Dr Heather Gulish Melton, said she "lost my true love and knight in shining armor. I appreciate the prayers but I just need some time."

An off-duty Las Vegas police officer was another of those who died.


'Mass shootings like a plague'

By the BBC's James Cook, in Las Vegas

The scenes which played out in this stunned city were at once frantically urgent and wearily familiar.

When gunfire rings out, Americans know the drill. Run.

They fled from a gunman who left a city in chaos.

For a time, Las Vegas looked and felt like a war zone. Hospitals were overwhelmed. There were not enough ambulances. A plea for blood donations echoed across the airwaves.

And now the mourning, the relief, the tears, the elation, the grief and a hundred other emotions are barely beginning.

Doctors are still battling to save lives.

For a Western democracy, the United States has seen an astonishing amount of horror like this.

But even for this country what happened here is carnage on a different scale.

America's mass shooting disease now feels like a plague.

Chart showing mass shooting incidents in the US

What gun laws does Nevada have?

Nevada has some of the least stringent gun laws in the United States.

People are allowed to carry weapons and do not have to register themselves as a gun-owner.

Background checks are done when people buy guns, but they are also allowed to sell them privately.

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Isn't it ironic that Americans kill more Americans than terrorists kill Americans?

Also, why isn't this guy being labeled as a "Terrorist"?

Oh ya, he's white......

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1 hour ago, deicer said:

Isn't it ironic that Americans kill more Americans than terrorists kill Americans?

Also, why isn't this guy being labeled as a "Terrorist"?

Oh ya, he's white......

deicer, not sure why you are playing the colour card.  Some terrorists are indeed white and are branded as being terrorists.  The term has absolutely nothing to do with the colour of their skin. The term does however seem to be mostly applied based on religion with a few notable exceptions such as

Quote

 

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21 hours ago, deicer said:

Oh ya, he's white......

It depends on motive, if it was done for a religious, political, or ideological objective then it was terrorism. Don’t think the facts are all in yet... white, black, etc doesn't matter. One thing is for sure, the middle ground in US/Canadian politics is shrinking and that doesn't bode well.

Her's the latest, hats off to the police, first responders and hospital workers. IMO the overall response was as good as it gets.

http://www.torontosun.com/2017/10/03/las-vegas-doctor-who-operated-on-shooting-victims-this-wasnt-a-normal-street-weapon

Edited by Wolfhunter
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October 4, 2017 5:00 am

Scott Thompson: Gun crime is America’s ‘terrorism’

By Scott Thompson Radio Host  900 CHML

Many have said that if the sniper attack on concert goers in Las Vegas was terrorist-related U.S. President Donald Trump would be banging his Muslim ban drum 24/7.

But when it turns out to be a well-off American white guy, immediately the conversation turns silent.

Just another crazy wacko, nothing to see here.

The president has repeatedly chastised other world leaders for not taking a hard stance on terror and protecting their citizens from harm.

In many cases, in lieu of offering condolences.

But how long can one point at other countries for their inability to protect their citizens when more Americans die by a citizen’s gun than any terrorist attack?

In some countries, the death count in America by guns every year (30,000+) would be considered a civil war.

What America does not realize is that when it comes to killing, it is just as bad as the Middle East, just self-inflicted.

Gun crime is America’s ‘terrorism’, and tarnishes their image as much as any other.

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So people feel a sense of relief because the shooter is white? I simply have no response for that. Change the definition of terrorism then, make it so inclusive as to include everything and be meaningless as a definition… or not, whatever.  Ban white people... or give everyone injections to make them the same colour. Poof, world peace, right?

Even though people at the centre of the political spectrum share many left leaning values, we are more afraid of the crazy left than the crazy right. That’s why the poles get it wrong and that’s why you have Trump and that’s why you will have more Trumps. The left will keep walking around the mountain until they stop being silly. Poof, I quit.
 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Definition of terrorism

:the systematic use of terror especially as a means of coercion
 
There is no indication that it be political.  Terrorism is the act of instilling terror.  The reason is moot.  It could be for sadistic pleasure.  This man instilled terror in thousands of concert goers.  he is, by definition, a terrorist.  plain and simple.
 
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"This man instilled terror in thousands of concert goers."

There's no doubt the perp scared the wits out of the concert goers, but the real objective of an act of 'terror' is to spread fear across a wide swath of the overall population and I don't believe most people feel that degree of personal concern in this case, yet at least. 

It's only an opinion, but until we have as 'full' an appreciation as possible of the perps motivation, I don't think we should get hung up on classification semantics.

Who knows, but the Las Vegas Sheriff seems to feel it's even too early to say there wasn't another person involved.

 

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2 hours ago, boestar said:

  Terrorism is the act of instilling terror. 

It is the use of violence or threat of violence (against innocent people)  in the pursuit of political aims, religious, or ideological change. If you expand it to scaring the cat while she's sleeping it becomes another useless, overworked liberal word. Like racism. To suggest that Canada is a racist state or that JT is a racist (BLM) is to not understand the true meaning of the word and to render it moot and overworked. Hero is now one of the most overworked words in the western world it seems. 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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To support that not all terrorists are called terrorists no matter their race / colour.

Pakistan Sufi shrine: At least 13 killed in Baluchistan


Pakistani devotees gather around the bodies of blast victims after a suicide bombing near a sufi shrine in Jhal Magsi October 5, 2017Image copyright AFP 
Image caption 
Devotees rushed to help the victims following the blast outside the shrine 

At least 13 people have been killed and 20 injured in a suicide attack on a Sufi Muslim shrine in Pakistan's south-western province of Baluchistan. 

Crowds of devotees had gathered for a three-day religious ceremony when the blast happened. 

The shrine is in Jhal Magsi, near the provincial capital Quetta. 

A regional official said the bomber had detonated his explosives after being stopped at the gate of the shrine by a policeman. The officer was killed.

Security forces have sealed off the building, Pakistani media reported.


It is unclear who carried out the attack, but Sufi shrines have been increasingly targeted by Islamist extremists in recent years. 

They view Sufism as heretical. 
◾Pakistan's Sufis under attack from Islamic hard-liners
◾ What is Sufism?
◾Will Pakistan ever stamp out extremism?

In February at least 80 people were killed in an attack on a shrine in Sehwan in southern Sindh province. So-called Islamic State said it was behind that attack.

Sufism is a mystical branch of Islam which spread throughout the Indian subcontinent in the 13th Century.

Sufis believe in saints who can intercede for them directly with God. Several million Muslims in Pakistan are believed to follow Sufism's tenets.
 

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3 hours ago, DEFCON said:

"This man instilled terror in thousands of concert goers."

There's no doubt the perp scared the wits out of the concert goers, but the real objective of an act of 'terror' is to spread fear across a wide swath of the overall population and I don't believe most people feel that degree of personal concern in this case, yet at least. 

It's only an opinion, but until we have as 'full' an appreciation as possible of the perps motivation, I don't think we should get hung up on classification semantics.

Who knows, but the Las Vegas Sheriff seems to feel it's even too early to say there wasn't another person involved.

 

Then you nullify many of the recent terror attacks around the world.  you can't have your cake and eat it too.  The only reason no one is afraid after the fact is because the guys is dead

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3 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

It is the use of violence or threat of violence (against innocent people)  in the pursuit of political aims, religious, or ideological change. If you expand it to scaring the cat while she's sleeping it becomes another useless, overworked liberal word. Like racism. To suggest that Canada is a racist state or that JT is a racist (BLM) is to not understand the true meaning of the word and to render it moot and overworked. Hero is now one of the most overworked words in the western world it seems. 

Adding the "political" to the definition is recent.  The original definition did not contain "political"  That is a definition that fits an agenda not terror for the sake of terror.  Changing the definition as such then places the blame on a group not an individual.  Don't get steered down that road.

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people need to see differences.

1: Walking into a bank and shooting 10 people and leaving with the cash.  Terrosim?   Nope.  Pointed attack to achieve a goal not related to instilling terror.

2: Walking down the middle of the road shooting random innocent people.  Terrorism?  Yep.  The only purpose to this act is to instill terror or fear in a population.  Size of that population does not matter.  There is no specific target.

3:  Driving a van throug a group of people on the street?  Terrorism?  Ultimately yes but can be debated if there was a specific target.  Was the purpose to kill that specific group or person or was the purpose to scare those people into running away.  

It is a fine line.  Violence for the sake of violence becomes terrorism.  Violence to achieve a set goal does not as once the goal is achieved there is no reason to fear anymore.

In Las Vegas we do no know this mans endgame.  Was it violence to instill fear or was his end game death by cop and take as many with him as he could.  Either way he met the criteria to be a terrorist.  he instill terror in a population even beyond the confines of the concert.  I can assure you people at the other end of the strip were scared as well when told they could not return to their hotels.

Don't fall into the trap the media sets out as well as the government talking heads.  

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It's not really that fine a line and it still is what it has been to most "talking heads". The definition I gave (above) is a simple soldiers one that can easily be applied to your scenarios. I'll grant you that defining the "nature and use" of terrorism and the "psychology" of the terrorist goes beyond the scope of this discussion... different critters. But, you've expanded a simple definition to something I don't recognize. Terrorism, by definition,  is more than simply terrorizing people. When the motive is discovered, he may well be a terrorist...personally, I don't see a problem with evil mass murderer in the interim.

I think this is simply an attempt (on the part of some) to compensate for the fact he is white as if expanding the definition or category changes the outcome. Another (overly simplistic) way of looking at it is A is mad at B and takes it out on C. In that context, it's premeditated and not violence simply for the sake of it. While we are at it,  I would like to expand the definition of handsome to include me. 

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Here are a few definitions for those inclined to accept the idea of motive over the popular (and decidedly liberal) notion of white supremacy:
 
State Department "Premeditated, politically motivated violence perpetrated against non-combatant targets by subnational groups or clandestine agents.”

FBI definition: "the unlawful use of force or violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives.”


Defense Department definition: "The unlawful use of violence or threat of violence to instill fear and coerce governments or societies. Terrorism is often motivated by religious, political, or other ideological beliefs and committed in the pursuit of goals that are usually political." 

United Nations Definition:
"...any act intended to cause death or serious bodily injury to a civilian, or to any other person not taking an active part in the hostilities in a situation of armed conflict, when the purpose of such act, by its nature or context, is to intimidate a population, or to compel a government or an international organization to do or to abstain from doing any act.”

Sounds like that ABC thing simple soldiers use eh? Count me fatigued by the constant reference to white privilege... he may be a terrorist, or not, depending on motive. I will leave skin colour to democrats and liberals, they seem to be obsessed with it... to quote the (movie) Deer Hunter, "this is this."  Stop showing up without your boots!

 

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A bit of perspective for a changing world and worth watching. Perhaps the reason simple soldiers view the world differently than many others...

 

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Yet another home grown terrorist, this time from Canada.  From Canada yet based on the name, sharing commonality with other terrorists.  

Canadian man pleads guilty to terrorism in plot targeting NYC landmarks: unsealed records

A Mississauga teen is awaiting sentencing in the 2016 plot and will be sentenced this December

By Shanifa Nasser, CBC NewsPosted: Oct 06, 2017 5:38 PM ET Last Updated: Oct 07, 2017 9:40 AM ET

The plot would have allegedly included detonating bombs in Times Square and the New York subway system, as well as shootings at various concert venues. (Kathy Willens/Associated Press)

 

A 19-year-old Mississauga, Ont., man is awaiting sentencing after pleading guilty to terrorism offences in a 2016 plot to detonate bombs in New York City.

The charges against Abdulrahman El Bahnasawy were made public Friday when the U.S. Attorney's Office (Southern District of New York) revealed the details of the plan that allegedly included detonating bombs in Times Square and in the New York subway system, as well as shootings at various concert venues.

According to the unsealed information, El Bahnasawy purchased bomb-making materials and helped secure a cabin within driving distance of the city for the purpose of building explosive devices.

Two others, Talha Haroon, a 19-year-old U.S. citizen living in Pakistan, and Russell Salic, a 37-year-old Philippine citizen, were also charged in connection with the alleged plot. The two were arrested outside of the U.S. and the hope, according to the release, is that they will be extradited to the U.S. for prosecution.

In an interview with CBC News, El Bahnasawy's lawyer Sabrina Shroff stressed his young age and called him "vulnerable."

"It's a very difficult situation undoubtedly — not just for him but also for his entire family," Shroff said.

 

'These Americans need an attack'

El Bahnasawy, who has been in custody since his arrest by the FBI in May 2016, pleaded guilty on Oct. 13, 2016. He is the only one of the three to have pleaded guilty so far.

Details of the charges were made public Friday when the U.S. Attorney's Office (Southern District of New York) unsealed the terrorism charges.

According to the allegations, El Bahnasawy and Haroon plotted to carry out the attacks in support of ISIS during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan.

In preparing for the attacks, the two communicated electronically with an undercover FBI agent posing as an ISIS supporter.

In the course of their communication, they allegedly declared their allegiance to ISIS and expressed their intent to carry out attacks resembling the recent Paris and Brussels attacks.

"These Americans need an attack," El Bahnasawy allegedly stated to the officer, saying he aspired "to create the next 9/11."

El Bahnasawy allegedly told the undercover officer that he was in contact with an ISIS affiliate about attack plans officially sanctioned by a branch of ISIS active in Pakistan, and introduced Haroon to the agent.

In May 2016, El Bahnasawy, while in Canada, purchased an "array of bomb-making materials," including 18 kilograms of hydrogen peroxide, a key ingredient in making improvised explosive devices. Batteries, thermometers, aluminum foil and Christmas lights were also purchased.

'A day that will change history'

That same month, El Bahnasawy informed the agent that he had been in communication with Salic, known to him as "Abu Khalid" and "the doctor," about acquiring more funding for the attacks. El Bahnasawy provided the man's contact information to the agent to facilitate the transfer.

On May 11, $423 US was sent from the Philippines to help fund the plan, the U.S. Justice Department says.

Meanwhile, El Bahnasawy shipped the bomb-making materials to the United States and allegedly told the agent he wanted to practice shooting at the cabin, which would need refrigeration for the purpose of making explosives.

On May 12, the undercover agent sent Salic a photo of the hydrogen peroxide purchased by El Bahnasawy. It's alleged the man expressed to the agent that he would pray for the success of the attack.

On May 20, Haroon deemed Times Square the "perfect spot" for the attack, the release alleges. In the course of his communications with the agent, the man allegedly discussed attacking as early as Memorial Day (May 30, 2016), saying, "that's a day that will change history."

Public never at risk, RCMP says

El Bahnasawy travelled to the New York City area on May 21, 2016, in preparation for staging and ultimately carrying out the attacks, allegedly with Haroon.

U.S. law enforcement monitored the trip in co-ordination with Canadian law enforcement and El Bahnasawy was arrested that night in Cranford, N.J. The two others were subsequently arrested — one in Pakistan and the other in the Philippines.

El Bahnasawy pleaded guilty last October to seven charges, including:

  • Conspiracy to use weapons of mass destruction.
  • Conspiracy to commit acts of terrorism transcending national boundaries.
  • Conspiring to bomb a place of public use and public transport.
  • Conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists.
  • Attempted provision and provision of material support and resources to terrorists.
  • Conspiracy to provide material support and resources to a designated foreign terrorist organization, i.e., ISIS.
  • Attempted provision and provision of material support and resources to a designated foreign terrorist organization, i.e., ISIS.

He is scheduled to be sentenced on Dec. 12, 2017.

Asked if El Bahnasawy will appeal, Shroff would not confirm but did say, "In every terrorism case in which the United States plays some role, there's always a concern about the length an undercover [agent] will go."

In a statement to CBC News Friday, the RCMP said that at no time was the safety or security of the public at risk during the investigation.

"Abdulrahman El-Bahnasawy is a Canadian citizen who was part of an international plot to commit terrorist attacks in the United States and the charges are a direct result of his involvement and role," the statement said.

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Deradicalization must be tailored to Canadian cities, says expert

Centre for prevention of violence issues early findings, still lacks special adviser

By Alison Crawford, CBC NewsPosted: Oct 07, 2017 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 07, 2017 8:00 AM ET
Politics

The radicalization of young Canadians is most often a local problem that requires programs tailored to specific cities, towns or even neighbourhoods.

That's one the preliminary findings by the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence.

The federal government set aside $35 million over five years for the centre, which was announced in August 2016. It works within the Department of Public Safety to provide training, support research and provide national leadership on counter-radicalization strategies for provinces, territories and municipalities.

"There's a whole number of risk factors, and that's the challenge — there's no agreement on what the best assessment tool is or what all the risk factors are," Ritu Banerjee, executive director of the centre, told CBC News.

People may be exposed to an assortment of extreme views, from Islamism to neo-Nazism, online, through their family, at their place of worship or school or in all these areas.

"So what you do out in Calgary might not necessarily work in Montreal or may not necessarily work in Moncton. So you have to be conscious of the local realities and the local needs," said Banerjee.

More than a year after the creation of Canada Centre, the government has yet to fill the top job of special adviser, who would formally shape and oversee the centre's work.

A senior government source with knowledge of the file told CBC News the government had tentatively filled the job earlier this year but the candidate backed out. The search has been renewed and the department said it expects to fill the job by the end of the year.

Social workers on front lines

Meanwhile, Banerjee and her staff have approved funding for several projects through the agency's community resilience fund. One initiative in Montreal trains front-line social workers who deal with vulnerable youth but likely were never educated about terrorism and national security threats.

"They're familiar with gang-related violence, they may be familiar with drugs, mental health issues, but the minute you start talking about terrorism, people get scared or people get nervous. So they need specialized support and training," Banerjee said.

Another of Canada Centre's early takeaways is that governments are not well placed to debate extremist ideologies.

'There's no agreement on what the best assessment tool is or what all the risk factors are,' says Ritu Banerjee, executive director of the centre. (Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence)

"We recognize that it's very difficult for a government to do that because we don't have the credibility to do that and it would be perceived as propaganda," Banerjee explained.

"Counter-arguments to a stated proposition have to be very much tailored to a specific audience. You have to be very careful and thoughtful about the approach you use, whether it's face-to-face, whether it's online and if you're doing it online, what platforms you use. And then, who is actually delivering the message."

Banerjee says research suggests intervening early to teach children how to think critically and be digitally literate is key to building community resilience to extremism.

Other programs being run in Toronto, Calgary and nationally by the RCMP will be evaluated by the University of Alberta and Ryerson University. Their findings will be shared with the public.
 

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It's been a couple weeks now since the LAS attack and there's still nothing in the way of a theory regarding the perps motivation being put forward by the authorities.

It's interesting to note that ISIS asserted responsibility for the crime early on and experience says that organization isn't prone to making false claims.

I wonder if any of the investigation groups have considered the possibility that hypnotism may have been employed to effect a result; the perp may have been a Manchurian Candidate of sorts?

  

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I was only speculating of course, but it's also way too early to presume the crime was simply the product of 'nuts'.

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^I disagree. There is no motivation for him killing innocent people. He had no ideology, was not trying to send any message, was not trying to foment any change. He was just bat **bleep** crazy.

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