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Jaydee

Canadian History now at risk of being deleted.

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"He acknowledged that some people might see this as a move to “erase history,” but stressed that it’s about creating spaces where all students feel accepted and safe."

I'll bet John A's name has been mortifying 'elementary' students for more than a century now.

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Here's a few under consideration in NYC:

Benjamin Franklin - owned slaves.
Theodore Roosevelt - statue is flanked by natives
George Washington- owned slaves at his Mt Vernon plantation

Fiorello La Guardia - put thousands of Japanese Americans under house arrest during WW2
Gen. Philip Henry Sheridan - for his “vicious” campaigns against Native Americans
Henry Hudson - imperialist interloper who looted Native American villages
Rudyard Kipling - critics see The Jungle Book as offensively pro-segregationist

 

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On 2017-08-23 at 1:25 PM, Fido said:

I hope that they soon get to taking Lester B Pearson's name from Toronto Airport.

More importantly erasing Trudeau from Montreal airport

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In Edmonton the Indians are demanding the city rename schools, districts, shopping centres because some guy named Oliver is not to their liking.

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The Democratic Party is / was the Party of the North American slave trader. Wouldn't the immediate elimination of this American relic serve the complainants purpose?

And if the complainants don't appreciate all the trappings of the modern world the 'ingenuity' of the whiteman has bestowed upon them, who amongst these whinners would like to be first to return to the place and or way of life of his ancestors?

 

 

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Historians move to strip Sir John A. Macdonald’s name from prestigious book prize

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎19, ‎2017, ‏‎2 hours ago | Graeme Hamilton

MONTREAL — The main association of Canadian history scholars has joined the movement to stop celebrating Sir John A. Macdonald as a national hero with a proposal to strip his name from a prestigious prize.

In an email sent this week, Canadian Historical Association president Adele Perry advised members that the association’s elected council voted last month to rename the 40-year-old Sir John A. Macdonald prize the “CHA prize for Best Scholarly Book in Canadian History.” Association members will make a final decision next May at their annual meeting.

James Daschuk, a University of Regina historian and winner of the Sir John A. Macdonald prize in 2014, said the change would be overdue.

“It is incumbent on us as historians maybe to lead the way, to provide information for citizens and political leaders,” he said in an interview. He said he would be surprised if the change was not overwhelmingly approved.

His own prize-winning book, Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life, was an indictment of Macdonald’s treatment of Indigenous people.

“As a white scholar, I was able to take winning the prize in stride and just think of it as an ironic thing that my work, which exposed Macdonald’s inhumanity, won the Macdonald prize,” he said. “I can imagine a time when an Indigenous scholar wins the prize, and it’s going to be a slap in the face.”

The prize, which includes a $5,000 cheque provided by sponsor Manulife, was first awarded in 1977. It is given to “the non-fiction work of Canadian history judged to have made the most significant contribution to an understanding of the Canadian past.”

Christopher Dummitt, a history professor at Trent University and a member of the association, said the move to rename the prize is evidence of the “purity spiral” the historical profession has entered.

“We’re finding more and more people who were not perfect according to our contemporary standards, and we’re trying to make sure that we don’t celebrate or even honour any of those figures,” he said.

“Now that it has reached Canada’s first and probably most important prime minister, it suggests that it’s not going to end.”

The historians’ move follows a call last summer by the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario to have Macdonald’s name removed from schools in the province in recognition of “his central role as an architect of genocide against Indigenous peoples . . . and the ways in which his namesake buildings can contribute to an unsafe space to learn and to work.”

Macdonald was prime minister when the federal government approved the first residential schools in the country.

In an article last September in the Winnipeg Free Press, Perry, the association president and a history professor at the University of Manitoba, said it is “too easy” to excuse Macdonald as a man of his time. “Macdonald’s commitment to white supremacy and his centrality to a suite of policies that meet the usual definition of genocide were noted during his lifetime,” she wrote.

In an interview Tuesday, Perry said that as association president she prefers not to take a public stance on the renaming. “As historians, we’re very mindful of questions about commemoration,” she said.

Jonathan Swainger, a history professor at the University of Northern British Columbia, said removing Macdonald’s name deprives historians of a “teachable moment” to illustrate how a figure once venerated also had serious flaws.

“There is no question the man was, in our terms, racist, but the simple fact is he wasn’t living in 2017. For him to have behaved and thought otherwise would have made him a very anomalous character,” Swainger said.

He worries the association has replaced scholarship with advocacy. “I’m not sure what the goal is, other than trying perhaps to be a contemporary advocate of a number of very important contemporary issues,” he said. “And it seems to me that when historians start becoming advocates, they cease being historians.”

The association, created in 1922 to foster the scholarly study of Canadian history, has nearly 1,000 members, mostly from academia.

Alan Sears, a professor of education at the University of New Brunswick, said the debate over renaming is helping promote a re-examination of Macdonald’s legacy. “What we decide to commemorate says something about us now, and we’re at a pretty critical moment right now in the Canadian conversation between Indigenous and settler peoples,” he said.

Robert Bothwell, a professor of history at the University of Toronto, called the proposed renaming “symbolic politics” and chose to put it in historical context.

“Defacing monuments and condemning the past go back to ancient Egypt, so why should we be surprised that the custom lingers?” he asked.

ghamilton@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/grayhamilton

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Why is there a sudden influx of judging people for deeds in the past by TODAYS standards?

Mere decades ago many of the things being brought up today were acceptable norms in society.  we have evolved and the rules changed.  We cannot keep going back and saying you were bad back then so must be punished now.

history is history leave it there but learn from it.

He was awarded the prized based on the standards of the day.  those standards were far different from today.  Let it rest.

 

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The trend might have something to do with Liberal politicians indoctrinating society by constantly going on fake teared apology tours. Trudeau being the worst of the bunch.

Edited by Jaydee

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I guess if we are to judge people based on their past practices, we will need to take a look at: scalping, hanging, lashing, keel hauling and the list is endless. 

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I patted a girl on the ass in 8th grade.  Where do I turn myself in?

 

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Not only deleted, but sucked into the raging vortex of stupid that is now on the verge of becoming a black hole.

http://torontosun.com/news/local-news/mandel-santa-claus-easter-bunny-tear-foster-family-apart

For good or ill, whether right or wrong, people in the centre of the political sphere see all of this stuff as part of a left wing agenda that refuses to be contained. As one of “those”, I’m more afraid of the left than I am of the right and I vote accordingly. You don’t like Trump?? Then consider this,  people in the centre are gold to your cause, simply put, YOU NEED ME. So, close the vortex or live with the consequences. How simple is that...

The Children of Israel turned a 10 day forced march into a 40 year adventure… here’s hoping liberals wake up. Or, you can pick up your pack and keep walking, I'll tell you when to stop. 

 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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Common Sense rules in small town Ontario.

'Swastika Trail' in southern Ontario to keep its name

Swastika Trail: Council votes to keep name
From CTV Kitchener: After much debate, a trail in Puslinch will keep its controversial name.

CTVNews.ca Staff
Published Thursday, December 21, 2017 8:44AM EST
Last Updated Thursday, December 21, 2017 9:11AM EST

A street in southern Ontario will continue to be called "Swastika Trail," after the local township council voted against changing the controversial name.

Puslinch Township Council voted 4-1 Wednesday evening against changing the name of the privately owned street. Council member cited a vote held two months ago in which members of the neighbourhood association voted 25-20 to keep the name.

Council members said Wednesday they didn’t want to overstep the democratic actions already taken by residents.

The Jewish service organization B'nai Brith Canada had launched an online petition calling on the township to change the street name. Many residents also said the name needed to change, arguing swastikas are associated with anti-Semitism and are still used by neo-Nazis.

"It's already a national shame that residents of your community are beholden to a name representing a symbol that was utilized in the murder of nearly 10 million people in concentration camps and more than 40,000 Canadian soldiers who went to fight the Nazis," Avi Benlolo, president and CEO of Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies, wrote in an open letter.

But those in support of keeping the name say the road was named in the 1920s, before the rise of Adolf Hitler in Nazi Germany. They argued the swastika had a long history before the Second World War as a symbol of peace.

One woman who lives on Swastika Trail, Tracy Riehl, explained before the vote that she didn’t want to see anything changed.

"Basically, it's because I don't want to have to change all our information. And I don't see how it's bad because it was good in the years and years before Hitler got a hold of it,” she told CTV Kitchener.

Council heard from 14 delegations before deciding against changing the street name.

Resident Natalie Busch said after the vote she’s glad the township voted to keep the name, saying the decision validates the opinion of the majority of street residents.

“We're proud to live on ‘Swastika’ and we don't need to change the name,” she told CTV Kitchener.

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I wonder what our GG would have to say about this? "Can you believe that still in today's educated society some people believe in Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny" perhaps?

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