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Jaydee

Trudeau to pay convicted Islamic TERRORIST $10.5M for suffering

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I find this settlement very disturbing and in particular the fact that there was no legal reason to make the payment, the courts had yet to rule.

July 7, 2017 8:00 am

COMMENTARY: Omar Khadr should be charged with treason, not given $10.5 million

It was reported this week that the Canadian government will pay former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr more than $10 million and officially apologize to him in settlement of a long-running lawsuit.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Every terrorist in the country will soon be lining up at the trough for a $10.5 million cheque.

Such is apparently the fate awaiting enemies of Canada according to the country’s own government, as seen in the settlement of a lawsuit by Omar Khadr, the man who confessed to throwing the grenade that killed American army medic Christopher Speer in Afghanistan.

Khadr’s actions in the 2002 firefight that killed Speer have not been tested in court in Canada, and his American appeal is not yet complete. He has not been exonerated — he’s simply out on bail.

Despite his Canadian citizenship, we must not forget that Khadr was an enemy combatant. Despite recanting his confession of killing Speer (he now says he doesn’t know whether he did it), Khadr was undeniably on the battlefield, and is also on video constructing improvised explosive devices (IEDs) — technology responsible for the deaths of 97 Canadians.

READ MORE: Widow of U.S. soldier seeking Omar Khadr’s $10.5M payout from Canada

Whether Khadr’s devices killed any of them we’ll never know, but he was making deadly weapons. Surely he didn’t think it was simply an al-Qaida arts and crafts project.

For the last 15 years, Khadr has tried to hide behind protections of his Canadian identity despite fighting for the enemy in the most literal sense. If Canadians won’t accept the legitimacy of the American military tribunal, let’s litigate this on our own soil.

He should be treated as a defector and charged with treason — an offense without a statute of limitations, I’d remind Canada’s attorney general.

Canada’s criminal code says anyone who “assists an enemy at war with Canada, or any armed forces against whom Canadian Forces are engaged in hostilities, whether or not a state of war exists between Canada and the country whose forces they are” is guilty of high treason, which carries a life sentence.

Canada’s mission in Afghanistan began in October of 2001, making the United States’ enemies our own as well.

Yet Khadr received a red carpet welcome when he was released from custody in 2015.

WATCH BELOW: Reports: Omar Khadr to get $10M from Canadian government

He’s not a hero, nor is he a victim. But the misinformation about this case doesn’t stop there.

Contrary to claims circulating this week, the multimillion-dollar deal was not ordered by the Supreme Court or any other level. It was brokered behind closed doors by Khadr’s lawyers and government officials.

The Supreme Court did rule in 2010 that Khadr’s rights as a Canadian were violated at Guantanamo Bay, highlighting visits from Canadian representatives in 2003 and 2004, during the Chretien-Martin years.

“The deprivation of (Khadr’s) right to liberty and security of the person is not in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice,” the court ruled in its unanimous decision. The court also affirmed the government should “decide how best to respond to this judgment.”

I don’t question the legitimacy of the Supreme Court, but it’s important to note that its justices were not interpreting international law, which forms the nuances of the Khadr case.

Anyone touting the government’s $10-million payout to Maher Arar as precedent is wrong. The RCMP was directly involved in the circumstances leading to Arar’s detainment and torture in Syria. And unlike Khadr, Arar was cleared of wrongdoing.

READ MORE: Here’s why Omar Khadr is getting $10M from the Canadian government

Khadr’s supporters see him as a “child soldier” and liken the military tribunal that convicted him to a kangaroo court.

According to testimony from lawyer Howard Anglin, speaking before the House of Commons’ international human rights subcommittee in 2008, Khadr was not a child soldier under international law, and his military tribunal was conducted in accordance with Geneva Convention standards.

Anglin cited a claim from Khadr’s own former military lawyer, Lt.-Cmdr. William Kuebler, that no law or treaty prevents prosecution of minors for war crimes.

Former United Nations human rights prosecutor David Crane agreed, saying it was a matter of prosecutorial discretion.

However, these legal arguments appear to take backseat to the emotional ones driving the narrative that Khadr is a victim of tragedy, rather than a perpetrator of it.

“No one reading this can say, with certainty, that his or her life would have turned out different from Omar Khadr’s if he or she was raised as he was,” said Jonathan Kay in a CBC column.

I agree that upbringing shapes much of one’s existence, but we must still be accountable for our own actions. We didn’t afford the benefit of the doubt to Nazi war criminals whose conduct could be linked to indoctrination, nor should we have.

Khadr’s father, Ahmed, was in Osama bin Laden’s inner circle. His older sister, Zaynab, has publicly praised bin Laden. His mother said in a CBC interview some years back that Canadians should wish their sons were as “brave” as hers.

If Khadr isn’t his father’s son, why has he not distanced himself from the family that set him up for failure?

Khadr was mature enough to know the consequences of his actions. I just wish the same could be said of the federal government.

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TRUDEAU MUST GO!

Canada cannot afford even another year of the kind of morality that this walking wart & insult to decency is bestowing upon this Country; he is a catalyst for civil collapse.

 

 

Edited by DEFCON
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At least this time they didn't personally INSULT all Canadians in the process. Only the government.

 

" So, Ralph Goodale is one of the two Trudeau Cabinet ministers officially apologizing to Omar Khadr. Regina and Saskatchewan will not forget this in 2019. "

Senator Denise Batters.

 

IMG_5058.PNG

Edited by Jaydee

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Time to put a face on the soldier he executed. The REAL victim!!

 

Christopher Speer

IMG_5059.JPG

Edited by Jaydee
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This is going around on social media.  I did not write it, but it does raise an interesting viewpoint.  Some rough language, so be warned.

 

  1. Okay, I'm **bleep** sick of the idiocy and done with writing a diatribe every single time a friend posts about how they're upset that Trudeau is giving a terroris...t $10m. You people are.... wilfully ignorant and hypocritical. Here's why. (And I thoroughly suggest reading the entire post. If you know me, you know I'm neither stupid, nor an apologist. I am pure **bleep** science, and this post is such. Read it before making an ass of yourself by posting about how we just gave a terrorist money).
  2. The story (the facts we know).
    * Canadian born Khadr was taken to Afghanistan at 15 years old, by his father. We don't know if he wanted to go, and we don't know why they went. There has been zero evidence put forth to suggest the trip had anything to do with terrorism. Regardless, as he was only 15, he had no choice in the matter.
    (EDIT: He was actually taken to Afghanistan at 9 years of age. He was taken to Gitmo at 15)
    * Khadr was found in critical condition following a firefight. The mission debrief report filed by the US troops stated that a middle aged man threw a grenade, which killed one US soldier. The grenadier was shot in the head and confirmed killed.
    * Khadr was taken to Guantanamo Bay prison. No charges were filed against him at that time.
    * Several years later, formal charges were filed. These charges were technically not even charges of war crimes, as if they were true, Khadr would be considered an enemy combatant during a time of war, and thus everything he was accused of doing, was legal under rules of engagement. He was denied access to a lawyer at this point and no trial date was set. He was held in detention and tortured for nearly 10 years.
    * Nearly a decade later, an addendum to the original mission debrief was submitted, which identified the grenadier as Khadr by name. The description was updated to match that of a 15 year old Khadr. The original report was not rescinded. No one knows who made the addendum. No US personnel present during the firefight confirms the addendum.
    * A week later, Khadr is offered a plea deal. The terms of the deal were to admit guilt to all charges and serve a few more years in a Canadian prison, or refuse to admit guilt and be denied trial indefinitely.
    * Khadr takes the plea deal, is transferred to Canada.
    * Khadr sues the Canadian government for their involvement in his illegal detention, torture, and lack of a trial.
  3. All of the above is true as far as anyone knows. That is the official story, from both the Canadian and US governments. They have said straight out that Khadr would not be offered a trial unless he took the plea deal. Just let that sink in for a moment.
  4. Now let me ask you a question.
    As a Canadian, what do you stand for? Do you believe that you, as a Canadian, have the right to be presumed innocent, until proven guilty, as well as the right to a fair and quick trial? I know this is hard for many of you to consider without jumping to "oh, but he's a terrorist, so **bleep** him, he's a traitor and doesn't deserve anything", but we'll get to that in a minute. Seriously consider this. Do you believe you have, as a Canadian, the inalienable right to everything laid out in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms?
  5. If you do, but still think Khadr does not, because he is a terrorist, let me ask you; "How do you know he is guilty?" There was no trial for 10 years, and he was only offered a trial on the condition that he plead guilty. How do we, as Canadians, determine guilt? Have you read and understood the Chart of Rights and Freedoms? It's entire purpose is precisely to ensure that what happened to Khadr, is not allowed to happen. Period.
  6. Now I know many of you still can't get past the "but he's a traitor so he doesn't deserve a trial" even though neither you, nor me, nor the US or Canadian government were able to provide ANY evidence whatsoever, of his guilt (no evidence was submitted during his trial, presumably because none exists), but that doesn't matter. Let me explain the problem to you.
  7. You are worried that terrorists are trying to take away your freedoms as a Canadian right? They're trying to force Sharia law upon us and we as Canadians, won't stand for that right?
  8. Do you see where I'm going here? Presuming Khadr's guilt, with no evidence and without trial, is precisely what the terrorists want to do to Canada. Isn't that your concern? Does it not strike you then, that by saying that Khadr doesn't deserve a fair trial because he is a terrorist, with absolutely no evidence, nor a trial to prove the charges, that you are doing precisely what you are worried the terrorists are trying to do do us? A presumption of guilt, no trial, a decade of detention and torture. Is that not Sharia law?
  9. At this point, I don't think any of us should even be concerned about Khadrs innocence or guilt. He is inconsequential at this point. The REAL concern for all Canadians, is that our government denied a Canadian citizen his inalienable rights, guaranteed to him under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. They did EXACTLY what you are worried the terrorists are trying to do. If Khadr was guilty, a trial probably would have proven such, so why was he denied a trial?
  10. For your information, the Canadian government did not simply offer up an apology and $10m for no reason. They were sued. The Canadian Supreme Court found in favour of Khadr, in that the Canadian government was in breach of Canadian and International law. That money will mostly be covering his legal fees. But here's where you should be more concerned about the money. The Canadian government spent $120m of your money, defending itself for committing what is legally, war crimes. Seriously. Your government, was just successfully sued, for war crimes. Crimes they committed not only against Khadr, but against the entire Canadian public. They assured us that we would all be given a fair trial, but now we know that is not true. They assured us that we will always be presumed innocent until proven guilty. We know that is not true. They took your money, money which could have been spent on building half a hospital or something, and spent it instead, on committing war crimes, and crimes directly against the Charter on which our country was founded.
  11. In summation:
    If you believe Khadr did not deserve a fair and quick trial, you are not Canadian. You do not stand for what Canada stands for. You are saying very clearly, that you don't care about evidence, treating people (who we presume are innocent until proven guilty) with basic decency, or your own or anyone else's right to a fair trial. You are, quite literally, openly supporting about half of Sharia law. You **bleep**wits.
  12. Addendum: Hey guys. I had no intention of this post reaching such a wide audience. It was really just directed at my fellow redneck buddies (all very excellent folk but who I felt could benefit from the data). I've adjusted some of the language to suit a wider audience.
    I appreciate the feedback (surprisingly generally positive), but bear in mind that with a post this widely shared, I cannot respond to the thousands of PM's flying at me. Feel free to re-share the post, or just copy/paste to your own feed to keep the conversation going. I absolutely do not need any personal attribution.

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48 minutes ago, deicer said:

This is going around on social media.

Then it must be true.

Did it go Viral?

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All the points may be true, but so is the most important one....TRUDEAU GAVE A CONVICTED TERRORIST 10.5 MILLION ....because he's a .........

Case closed.

Edited by Jaydee
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10 hours ago, Fido said:

Then it must be true.

Did it go Viral?

Wasn't put up as truth, just as another point of view.

Here is another one from the National Observer, (  https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/national-observer-canada/ )  and while it is a left center publication, also known for factual reporting.  This one includes more facts and photos.

 

http://www.nationalobserver.com/2017/07/07/opinion/what-if-omar-khadr-isnt-guilty

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2 hours ago, deicer said:

Wasn't put up as truth, just as another point of view.

Here is another one from the National Observer, (  https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/national-observer-canada/ )  and while it is a left center publication, also known for factual reporting.  This one includes more facts and photos.

 

http://www.nationalobserver.com/2017/07/07/opinion/what-if-omar-khadr-isnt-guilty

The other side of the discussion not littered with.... if this, if that......

 

" Omar Khadr should be charged with treason, not given $10.5 million

It was reported this week that the Canadian government will pay former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr more than $10 million and officially apologize to him in settlement of a long-running lawsuit.

Every terrorist in the country will soon be lining up at the trough for a $10.5 million cheque.

Such is apparently the fate awaiting enemies of Canada according to the country’s own government, as seen in the settlement of a lawsuit by Omar Khadr, the man who confessed to throwing the grenade that killed American army medic Christopher Speer in Afghanistan.

Khadr’s actions in the 2002 firefight that killed Speer have not been tested in court in Canada, and his American appeal is not yet complete. He has not been exonerated — he’s simply out on bail.
Despite his Canadian citizenship, we must not forget that Khadr was an enemy combatant. Despite recanting his confession of killing Speer (he now says he doesn’t know whether he did it), Khadr was undeniably on the battlefield, and is also on video constructing improvised explosive devices (IEDs) — technology responsible for the deaths of 97 Canadians.

Whether Khadr’s devices killed any of them we’ll never know, but he was making deadly weapons. Surely he didn’t think it was simply an al-Qaida arts and crafts project.

For the last 15 years, Khadr has tried to hide behind protections of his Canadian identity despite fighting for the enemy in the most literal sense. If Canadians won’t accept the legitimacy of the American military tribunal, let’s litigate this on our own soil.

He should be treated as a defector and charged with treason — an offense without a statute of limitations, I’d remind Canada’s attorney general.

Canada’s criminal code says anyone who “assists an enemy at war with Canada, or any armed forces against whom Canadian Forces are engaged in hostilities, whether or not a state of war exists between Canada and the country whose forces they are” is guilty of high treason, which carries a life sentence.

Canada’s mission in Afghanistan began in October of 2001, making the United States’ enemies our own as well.

Yet Khadr received a red carpet welcome when he was released from custody in 2015.

He’s not a hero, nor is he a victim. But the misinformation about this case doesn’t stop there.

Contrary to claims circulating this week, the multimillion-dollar deal was not ordered by the Supreme Court or any other level. It was brokered behind closed doors by Khadr’s lawyers and government officials.

The Supreme Court did rule in 2010 that Khadr’s rights as a Canadian were violated at Guantanamo Bay, highlighting visits from Canadian representatives in 2003 and 2004, during the Chretien-Martin years.

“The deprivation of (Khadr’s) right to liberty and security of the person is not in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice,” the court ruled in its unanimous decision. The court also affirmed the government should “decide how best to respond to this judgment.”

I don’t question the legitimacy of the Supreme Court, but it’s important to note that its justices were not interpreting international law, which forms the nuances of the Khadr case.

Anyone touting the government’s $10-million payout to Maher Arar as precedent is wrong. The RCMP was directly involved in the circumstances leading to Arar’s detainment and torture in Syria. And unlike Khadr, Arar was cleared of wrongdoing.

Khadr’s supporters see him as a “child soldier” and liken the military tribunal that convicted him to a kangaroo court.

According to testimony from lawyer Howard Anglin, speaking before the House of Commons’ international human rights subcommittee in 2008, Khadr was not a child soldier under international law, and his military tribunal was conducted in accordance with Geneva Convention standards.

Anglin cited a claim from Khadr’s own former military lawyer, Lt.-Cmdr. William Kuebler, that no law or treaty prevents prosecution of minors for war crimes.

Former United Nations human rights prosecutor David Crane agreed, saying it was a matter of prosecutorial discretion.

However, these legal arguments appear to take backseat to the emotional ones driving the narrative that Khadr is a victim of tragedy, rather than a perpetrator of it.

“No one reading this can say, with certainty, that his or her life would have turned out different from Omar Khadr’s if he or she was raised as he was,” said Jonathan Kay in a CBC column.

I agree that upbringing shapes much of one’s existence, but we must still be accountable for our own actions. We didn’t afford the benefit of the doubt to Nazi war criminals whose conduct could be linked to indoctrination, nor should we have.

Khadr’s father, Ahmed, was in Osama bin Laden’s inner circle. His older sister, Zaynab, has publicly praised bin Laden. His mother said in a CBC interview some years back that Canadians should wish their sons were as “brave” as hers.

If Khadr isn’t his father’s son, why has he not distanced himself from the family that set him up for failure?

Khadr was mature enough to know the consequences of his actions. I just wish the same could be said of the federal government. "

Edited by Jaydee

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As soon as you take up arms against Canada you cease to be a citizen and have no standing under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, IMO.

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Yes indeed!  You do have to wonder why he was not so judged, seems to me the "shoe" fits, in fact it seems that he should have been charged with "high treason". 

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/treason/Treason is probably the oldest and most serious offence in political society, with the possible exception of murder. The earliest English treason legislation, which dates from 1351, is the basis of all treason legislation in the English-speaking world.

Treason is probably the oldest and most serious offence in political society, with the possible exception of murder. The earliest English treason legislation, which dates from 1351, is the basis of all treason legislation in the English-speaking world. Originally, treason meant an attack upon the person or life of the monarch, but as the state became more important than its sovereign, treason came to indicate any act directed at the overthrow of the government or against the security of the state. Anyone participating in a rebellion or an unsuccessful revolution is technically guilty of treason, although only the leaders tend to be prosecuted. Conversely, it is not uncommon for the leaders of a successful revolution to try former opponents for treason.

The Criminal Code establishes offences of "high treason" and "treason," and offences respecting acts related to treason; it also sets out certain evidential rules and limitation periods for the prosecution of treason offences.

Under s46 of the Criminal Code, a person commits "high treason" who a) kills, attempts to kill, wounds, imprisons, or restrains the sovereign,  wages war against Canada or does any act preparatory thereto, or c) assists an enemy at war with Canada or any armed force against whom Canadian forces are engaged in hostilities, even if no state of war exists. The punishment for high treason is life imprisonment, without parole eligibility for 25 years. A person commits "treason" who a) uses force or violence for the purpose of overthrowing the government of Canada or a province,  discloses, without lawful authority, military or scientific material to agents of a foreign state, if he or she knows or should know that the material may be used to impair Canada's safety or defence, or c) engages in certain listed conspiracies or attempted offences. The punishment for treason is life imprisonment; normal parole rules apply. Canadian citizens and persons owing allegiance to Her Majesty in right of Canada who commit acts of high treason or treason are punishable under Canadian criminal law even if the acts were performed outside Canada.

The Criminal Code also penalizes such acts as alarming the sovereign, assisting an alien enemy to leave Canada, failing to make reasonable efforts to prevent the commission of high treason, intimidating Parliament or a legislature, sabotage, incitement to mutiny and sedition.

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.

Canada failed Omar Khadr. We owed him compensation and an apology

Sat Jul 08, 2017 - The Globe and Mail
Romeo Dallaire and Alex Neve

Lieutenant-General (retired) Roméo Dallaire is the founder of the Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative. Alex Neve is secretary-general of Amnesty International Canada.

It is close to 15 years since the July 27, 2002, firefight in Afghanistan that killed a U.S. soldier, injured another, and left 15-year-old Canadian citizen Omar Khadr badly wounded and near death.

And thus began an agonizing and Kafkaesque years-long journey of injustice, suffering and abandonment for a teenager who was a child soldier and should never have been pushed into the middle of a war in the first place.

There is much blame to go around for the harm and wrongs done to Mr. Khadr. Clearly his father should never have put him in this situation in the first place. Undeniably, U.S. officials bear the bulk of responsibility for the endless human rights violations he endured – including torture, ill-treatment, arbitrary detention and an unfair trial – in both the notorious Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan and the infamous Guantanamo Bay detention centre.

But there is more. Canada is part of Mr. Khadr’s story, very much part of that story. And it is by no means a source of pride.

'Canada was punitive, mean and vindictive.'

.

 

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Has anyone found a specific reference that indicates the Charter of Rights and Freedoms applies around the world?? A quick look at the gov't website says :

Who enjoys Charter rights?

Generally speaking, any person "IN" Canada, whether a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident or a newcomer, has the rights and freedoms contained in the Charter. 

 

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"  'I hit the jackpot'," Khadr said softly, his brow furrowed. "I'm sorry if this is causing people pain."

 

 

IMG_5066.JPG

Edited by Jaydee

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Kadhar was a pseudo - Canadian operating as a 'soldier' on behalf of a certain ideology in a foreign land against us and our friends.

Khadr's 'intent' and purpose have never been in question.

In this Country the law says it doesn't matter whether you pulled the trigger, or not.

At fifteen, Kadhar was clearly old enough to be indicted as an adult.

What else is there to discuss?

Why do we, meaning Canada, put more effort into the creation of truly lame explanations to excuse criminals, etc. for their attempts to kill us than we do prosecuting them for their transgressions against us?

 

 

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Regardless of what the sock puppet says, this matter isn't over by a long shot. Canadians are **bleep**. Expect fireworks on the resumption of parliament. 2019 seems so far away right now.

"We’re not allowed to say this anymore, but you know the inmates have seized the national asylum when the country’s founding father is vilified as a genocidal monster while a former terrorist, a so-called “child soldier” who pleaded guilty to murdering an American medic, is portrayed by the social/judicial elites as both victim and hero and transformed overnight into a multi-millionaire with our tax dollars."

 

http://windsorstar.com/opinion/columnists/the-war-on-history-just-beginning?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_campaign=Echobox&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook#link_time=1499461537

Edited by Jaydee
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Did you ever wonder if we were once living in a world that made sense, but after breaking too many rules we died and without knowing were transferred to a place in purgatory where ghouls like Trudeau lead? Are Trump and his supporters the entertainment at Camp Tribulation for Deicer and his ilk?

Submitted only because the present reality doesn't add up ... 

 

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1 hour ago, DEFCON said:

Did you ever wonder if we were once living in a world that made sense, but after breaking too many rules we died and without knowing were transferred to a place in purgatory where ghouls like Trudeau lead? Are Trump and his supporters the entertainment at Camp Tribulation for Deicer and his ilk?

Submitted only because the present reality doesn't add up ... 

 

 

IMG_4928.JPG

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