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Paris Airshow 2017

Supersonic flight promised by 2023 as Boom announces airline orders

2 Hours AgoCNBC.com
 
Boom Technology's supersonic flights not science fiction

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The return of Concorde supersonic flight has been brought a step closer with the announcement that 5 airlines have placed a total of 76 orders with U.S. firm Boom.

Virgin is the only known customer of the concept stage supersonic passenger airliner with the other four to be announced at special events.

"Airlines are excited for something new and different to offer their passengers and we're thrilled that major world airlines share our vision for a future of faster, more accessible supersonic travel. We look forward to sharing more about these partnerships in the future," said Blake Scholl, founder and CEO at the Paris Air Show press conference.

 

Scholl added the new aircraft reservations are backed by "tens of millions" of dollars in non-refundable payments.

Boom claimed the average length of flight from Paris to New York would drop to three and a half hours from 7 when the full airliner flies, utlilzing its full Mach 2.2 speed. Another example given was San Francisco to Tokyo which would take a little over 5 hours, compared to the current 11.

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Concorde, which debuted at the Paris Air Show 48 years ago this week, had a top speed of Mach 2.

The full plane comes with two configurations of either 55 business class seats or 15 business with 30 first class seats or longer flights. The plane would have a list price to customers of $200 million.

A business class ticket from London to New York is estimated at $5,000.

The company wants the plane in the skies by 2023 but is first developing a smaller supersonic jet to test the technology.

Scholl said the XB-1 Supersonic Demonstrator will fly in Denver late next year after passing a major performance and safety test.

"We now have everything required to build history's first independently developed supersonic aircraft—the funding, technical design, and manufacturing partners," said Scholl.

GE, Honeywell, Tencate and Stratasys are among the firms working on the Boom Supersonic development.

http://www.cnbc.com/2017/06/20/supersonic-flight-2023-as-boom-announces-airline-orders.html

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Well, this should be interesting. Heat dissipation I think is the biggest problem. I understand that is the reason for the Concorde being limited to just a hair over M2 was the heat generated when you go faster is a huge problem for the metallurgy, coatings, adhesives etc. The Concorde was VERY leaky. I went on board in YYT years ago. Tubs of Zorball under it with the Air France maintenance guy just shaking his head. TU-144 which was faster was worse. SR 71 for all the problems they solved to make it fly, they never got it to stop leaking. You go M2.2 - you got heat. Lots of it. Then throw in noise and airspace restrictions and ya got whatcha call  yer hands full.

I'll watch to see if they have a magic bullet workaround.

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they only leak on the ground.  Everything tightens up in the air as the speed increases.  Also do not forget that the technology in all the examples was 1950s - 1960s technology.  there has been leaps and bounds in fluid dynamics and methods to reduce the heat generated by the friction of the air.  Aerodynamics advances have also been able to reduce the sonic boom substantially.

 

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Yes the leaks were primarily on the ground when the aircraft cooled off. But frankly I don't think local environmental authorities care why it's leaking. But, correct me if I'm wrong but I believe the heat is not created by friction. It is primarily a function of compression. Not much you can do about that, I don't think.  Lots of advances in all sorts of areas but running up past M2 I think still creates more expensive problems than you're going to want to throw money at. When I see a Mach 2 plus airplane being sold for 200 million dollars I'll believe it

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Well, from my understanding, the leaking had nothing what so ever with the fuel. It was leaking simply because of the strain on the fuel tanks produced by the constant thermal expansion and contraction of the structure and they never found a way of effectively sealing the tanks. Fwiw, the very special fuel for the -71 was very difficult to ignite. It took a type of explosive called PEK to start the engines. If they ran out of the stuff and needed an airborne relight, they were out of luck.  Ground fires were almost impossible.

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Quote

Concorde, which debuted at the Paris Air Show 48 years ago this week, had a top speed of Mach 2.

I read that and thought how time flies.

Even faster than M2.2  (groan)

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The concorde and Sr71 alike, due to their overall length required "slip joints" in all the connections for fuel, hydraulics and pneumatics.  This is due to the expansion that take place due to the heating of the airframe.  The SR 71 was refuelled in flight after takeoff to minimize fluid loss.

if these "leaks" were not there then the lines would rupture under the stress.  The leaks were engineered into the aircraft for all intents and purposes.

As for the heating, yes the compression of the air at the leading edges and nose of the aircraft caused much of the heating much like a re-entry vehicle coming back from space. other areas of the fuselage became warm due to the friction of the air passing over the surface but to a much lesser degree.  for example the windows were warm to the touch in flight.

 

As I stated earlier those designs were on an actual Drawing board with actual pencils doing the designs using slide rules and brains.  today we use CAD software which will actually do all of the fluid dynamics analysis of a surface for you without a wind tunnel.  This allows for every detail to be optimized for the most efficient airflow.  this reduces much of the aerodynamic drag and changes the properties of the shockwave propagation to reduce the sonic boom.  We have come a long way in 50 years.

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