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Malcolm

Sharing the cost of legalized Marijuana

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28 minutes ago, deicer said:

Considering the article is pure satire...not everything was made up...., at least they pegged the description of Trudeau accurately .

” I told you so,” said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, looking considerably less handsome than usual with his blood-shot eyes. “It’s remarkable! You’re crippled with debt one day and the next it’s all vanished into thin air. “

Edited by Jaydee

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Typical government fashion.  buy a gram in Ontario for $13 and get .6 of a gram.  can't wait for the lawsuits to start.

 

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Border Turnbacks are happening.

Residents who admit to pot use turned away at U.S. border, says Estevan, Sask., mayor

The mayor of Estevan, Sask., says local residents have been turned away at the nearby U.S. border after admitting to past pot use.

'Some that have smoked are saying no, because they're scared that they may be banned for life'

Guy Quenneville · CBC News · Posted: Oct 30, 2018 5:00 AM CT | Last Updated: 17 minutes ago
 
Estevan Mayor Roy Ludwig says some local people have reported being asked at the nearby U.S. border about their past pot use since recreational cannabis was legalized in Canada. (Roy Ludwig)

The mayor of Estevan, Sask., says local residents have been turned away at the nearby U.S. border after admitting to past pot use.

"It is a fairly serious concern," said Roy Ludwig, mayor of the 11,258-person city located just 16 kilometres north of a North Dakota border crossing.

"Even people that might have smoked it 20, 30 years ago, they're being asked, 'Have you ever smoked cannabis?' when they get to the U.S. border. We understand some people have said yes, that they have, and have been turned back."

 

Ludwig said several Estevan residents have undergone strict questioning at the U.S. border since recreational cannabis was legalized in Canada less than two weeks ago. He said he knows of two people who were turned away and not allowed to cross the border. 

Estevan is located just 16 kilometres north of the border with North Dakota. (CBC)

Recreational cannabis use is not legal in North Dakota, and pot possession is still illegal under U.S. federal law.

The Canadian government warned people pre-legalization that "previous use of cannabis, or any substance prohibited by U.S. federal laws, could mean that you are denied entry to the U.S." 

Not everyone who wants to cross the border is reacting the same way to those rules, according Ludwig.

"Some are saying the truth, saying yes, they have smoked it, and then some that have smoked are saying no because they're scared that they may be banned for life," he said. 

 

Estevan is one of the 32 Saskatchewan communities that either has or will have a recreational cannabis store. It's the southernmost place people will be able to buy legal cannabis in Saskatchewan.

The community was originally supposed to get two stores, but the city — after consulting Estevan Police Services —  asked that the second permit be put off until factors like traffic could be reviewed after the first store opened.

That store is being prepared by Prairie Sky Cannabis, the same company currently operating legal pot stores in Martensville and Battleford. They operate those stores under the name Jimmy's Cannabis. 

An American customs official recently told CBC News that those found at the border with cannabis on their person, or in their car, could face arrest and prosecution by U.S. officials.

The president of Jimmy's Cannabis, which owns a store in Martensville, above, says his planned Estevan store will focus on pre-rolled cannabis as a way of encouraging people to consume on this side of the border. (Prairie Sky Cannabis)

That's why the Jimmy's Cannabis store in Estevan might tweak its product line compared with its sister stores

 

"There might be more things like pre-rolls and things that are higher-convenience for short-term use [inside Saskatchewan]," said Thomas.

Stay overnight for the 'fine hotels'

 

Ludwig said city councillors have talked about whether the flow of cannabis-craving Americans into Estevan might  present the community with a business opportunity that also discourages people from driving under the influence.

 

"People advertising and saying, 'Stay at some of our fine hotels and enjoy some of our fine restaurants and indulge in cannabis if you want to try it out. And then stay overnight and go back sober.'

 

"We haven't done that yet," said Ludwig, "but we've definitely talked a little bit about it."

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just went to Michigan by car.  The question never came up

 

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On ‎10‎/‎30‎/‎2018 at 6:33 PM, boestar said:

just went to Michigan by car.  The question never came up

 

Seems that the some of the major pitfalls may exist in Canada due to different Provincial laws.

November 7, 2018 9:23 am
Updated: November 7, 2018 9:25 am

Police in B.C. issue $230 fine, say man had pot-filled pipe within reach while driving

amy-judd-crop.jpg?quality=60&strip=all&w By Amy Judd Online Supervisor BC  Global News West Vancouver police shared a photo of the ticket issued to the driver on Nov. 6." />; West Vancouver police shared a photo of the ticket issued to the driver on Nov. 6.

West Vancouver police shared a photo of the ticket issued to the driver on Nov. 6.

West Vancouver police
 

A Calgary driver has learned about B.C.’s new pot laws the hard way.

The 23-year-old was issued a $230 ticket during a road check on the Lions Gate Bridge on Nov. 6.

Officers say they spotted a pot-filled pipe within reach of the driver’s seat and wrote the man a ticket for violating the Cannabis Control and Licensing Act.

 

Adults are allowed to have up to 30 grams of cannabis in a vehicle but it must be in a sealed package and out of reach of the driver.

This is the first time West Vancouver police have issued a ticket under the new B.C. Cannabis Act.

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So by extension, a cancer patient that carries his Percocette in his pocket to keep it secure and then drives could be charged as well?

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1 hour ago, DEFCON said:

So by extension, a cancer patient that carries his Percocette in his pocket to keep it secure and then drives could be charged as well?

So it seems:

Quote

Cannabis in vehicle operated by adult

81  (1) An adult must not operate a vehicle, whether or not the vehicle is in motion, while

(a) the adult has personal possession of cannabis, or

(b) there is cannabis in the vehicle.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply if the cannabis

(a) was produced by a federal producer, is still in the packaging from its purchase by a consumer and the packaging has never been opened,

(b) is not readily accessible to the driver and any passengers in the vehicle, or

(c) is no more than 4 cannabis plants that are not budding or flowering.

(3) Subsection (1) does not apply to an adult described in section 51 (d), (e) or (f).

51  This Division does not apply to the following:

(a) the government and its employees when acting in the course of their employment and its agents when acting in their role as agents;

(b) analysts when working for the government in their role as analysts;

(c) individuals who are authorized to administer or enforce this Act, the Cannabis Distribution Act, the Cannabis Act (Canada) or other Acts of British Columbia or Canada with respect to cannabis when acting under that authority;

(d) licensees and their employees and agents when acting under the authority of the licence;

(e) persons who hold a licence, permit or authorization under the Cannabis Act (Canada) and their employees and agents when acting under the authority of the licence, permit or authorization;

(f) common carriers who are transporting cannabis as authorized under the Cannabis Act (Canada), their employees when acting in the course of their employment and their agents when acting in their role as agent.

 

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Just the same in Ontario if you want to transport alcohol in your car.  Just a continuation of the same rule.

https://www.agco.ca/alcohol/general-alcohol-faqs

Under what circumstances is it illegal to transport beverage alcohol?
It is illegal to transport beverage alcohol in a motor vehicle, a motorized snow vehicle or a boat unless the beverage alcohol is in a container that is unopened and the seal unbroken, or unless the beverage alcohol is packaged in baggage that is fastened closed or is not otherwise readily available to anyone in the vehicle. In a boat, the beverage alcohol must be stored in a closed compartment.

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The act is specific to Cannibis.  It soes not specify Percocette or any other prescription medication.  However if the prescription medication specifies that one should not operate a motor vehicle then you could be considered legally impaired but transportation of the medication is not restricted.  Otherwise you could just sit outside a shoppers Drug Mart and lay charges all day.

 

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November 14, 2018 5:24 pm
Updated: November 14, 2018 5:29 pm

Fights over tight cannabis supplies prompt Alberta regulator to change rules

2018-web-head-shots-fletcher-kent1.jpg?q By Fletcher Kent Reporter  GlobalShelves at Elevate Cannabis sit bare. The store owner is still waiting for his shipment." />; Shelves at Elevate Cannabis sit bare. The store owner is still waiting for his shipment.

Shelves at Elevate Cannabis sit bare. The store owner is still waiting for his shipment.

A national cannabis shortage has led to corporate battles for whatever pot is available. Now, Alberta Gaming, Liquor and Cannabis has stepped in to referee some of the disputes.

Retailers are no longer be able to order pot online. On Monday, the AGLC told all store owners they would have to manually order their next shipment.

When marijuana became legal on Oct. 17, licensed retailers could place orders with the AGLC online. The first company to stake a claim to the pot would receive it.

AGLC said it has not received the product it expected by growers. Nationally, other regulators are dealing with similar shortages. Demand has met or exceeded expectations. Those market conditions meant the online ordering plan did not work as intended.

READ MORE: Canada-wide cannabis shortages could last years, producers warn

Retailers fiercely competed for whatever product they could find.

Joshua Vera is the founder of Elevate Cannabis in Edmonton. His company received a licence to start selling two weeks ago.

His doors remain closed and on Wednesday, he put up a sign telling would-be customers he’s out of stock.

“It’s been frustrating,” Vera said. “I’ve been getting phone calls all day, every day. People are asking when I’m going to be open, if I have product.”

Vera has been trying to buy product. Since getting his licence, he and his store manager have spent many sleepless nights sitting in front of computers waiting for AGLC to get something they can order.

“It was probably about 99 per cent of logging in and seeing everything was out of stock. When something was uploaded to the system, it would be a matter of literally seconds before it was gone.”

There was always some other retailer able to order the cannabis faster.

Watch below: As cannabis shortages continue across Canada, even the AGLC’s website has almost nothing available for buyers. As Fletcher Kent reports, some say the supply chain needs to be fixed.

2018-10-30T00-10-37.066Z--1280x720.jpg?w=670&quality=70&strip=all

Global News called all the cannabis stores in the Edmonton region. Most are either out of product or have limited supplies. Fire and Flower indicated it had “lots” of stock at all of its stores.

Stories like this prompted AGLC to change its ordering process. All stores must now manually submit an order form once a week. The AGLC will then determine how to divvy up whatever supply it has.

“I think this fair allocation of the inventory will ensure every retailer gets a fair shot at some product instead of some maybe getting more and some getting none,” the AGLC’s Riaz Nejad said.

Some retailers have expressed concerns other stores were using automated bots to secure shipments. The AGLC says it is not aware of any bots but this new method levels the playing field.

The new ordering process does not deal with the bigger issue.

READ MORE: Edmonton Marijuana enthusiasts line up at cannabis stores on legalization day.

The AGLC hasn’t received the shipments promised by growers. It wouldn’t say how much less it has received. Nejad would only say the regulator is “substantially short.”

Nova Scotia says it has received only 40 per cent of what it had ordered. New Brunswick got between 20 and 30 per cent of what the regulator there expected on legalization day. Quebec has had to reduce store hours to four days a week to deal with supply problems.

Growers have said they have the capacity to meet demand over the long term. Initial hiccups and growing pains coupled with high demand in the early days of legalization have created some problems.

The AGLC, however, says the shortages could be chronic. Staff have been looking for new suppliers but so far, no luck.

READ MORE: More Edmonton Cannabis stores face supply shortages; demand ‘way more than anticipated’

“We’ve talked to every other licensed producer in Canada that has a sales licence and we’re getting little bits of product coming in,” said Nejad, who predicts the shortages could last another six to 18 months.

Vera worries about that. Right now, though, he’s relieved the new ordering system is giving him something to sell.

He’s expecting his first delivery next week and thinks Elevate could open next Saturday.

Despite these problems and his unexpected added costs, Vera still believes in the industry.

“We’ll get there,” he said. “We’re less than a month into legalization and we’ll get there.”

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Now that we've had two months of legal cannabis in Canada, I find it very interesting that no level of government is talking about the amount of money they have made through taxes.

With demand exceeding expectations, as well as supply, the estimate of 800 tonnes of pot being ordered by year end might just be attainable.  The marijuana tax of $1/gm would lead to a potential Federal tax intake of $800million which is supposed to be split 75% for the provinces, 25% for the Feds. That doesn't include the HST as well.

It's estimated that the legal market will be just over $7 Billion next year.  More than alcohol sales.

What is the tax intake?

 

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26 minutes ago, deicer said:

Now that we've had two months of legal cannabis in Canada, I find it very interesting that no level of government is talking about the amount of money they have made through taxes.

With demand exceeding expectations, as well as supply, the estimate of 800 tonnes of pot being ordered by year end might just be attainable.  The marijuana tax of $1/gm would lead to a potential Federal tax intake of $800million which is supposed to be split 75% for the provinces, 25% for the Feds. That doesn't include the HST as well.

It's estimated that the legal market will be just over $7 Billion next year.  More than alcohol sales.

What is the tax intake?

 

the biggest problem now is a lack of supply so the illegal form is doing very well..   I wonder how much in taxes we have lost because of the supply issue? 

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High grade pot is going for as little as $80 per ounce on the street at present; it was $200 until the government got involved.

With all levels of government wanting a piece of the action, legal weed suppliers are presently forced to charge an average price of approximately $350 per ounce.

When the novelty period ends and the dust settles the gov will find that most people can't afford the $350 per ounce price.

   

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On 12/20/2018 at 11:47 AM, DEFCON said:

High grade pot is going for as little as $80 per ounce on the street at present; it was $200 until the government got involved.

With all levels of government wanting a piece of the action, legal weed suppliers are presently forced to charge an average price of approximately $350 per ounce.

When the novelty period ends and the dust settles the gov will find that most people can't afford the $350 per ounce price.

   

As we were all saying for months ...DuHHHHHHHH...The market will balance itself.  :whistling:   Trudeau Ecnomics at work !!  :whistling:

 

Black market cannabis is $3 cheaper per gram, Statistics Canada survey finds

 

https://globalnews.ca/news/4831121/statcan-cannabis-price-survey/

Edited by Jaydee

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45 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

As we were all saying for months ...DuHHHHHHHH...The market will balnace itself.  :whistling:   Trudeau Ecnomics at work !!  :whistling:

 

Black market cannabis is $3 cheaper per gram, Statistics Canada survey finds

 

https://globalnews.ca/news/4831121/statcan-cannabis-price-survey/

Nothing really different than the black market tobacco.  You do however wonder why Trudeau etc. would not have realized that.

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I don't know how the numbers are stacked anymore, but back when the cops busted a guy they calculated the value of the weed on a per joint basis at a price of $5, which left the public with a false impression of the product's value.

For instance; in that scheme the consumer is expected to get approximately 2.5 joints per gm, which makes 120 gm, or 1/4 lb of product worth somewhere north of $1400.

In the real world the user would have purchased the 1/4 lb for $600, the standard street price for that volume in the day.

From there the price paid would continue to decrease as the weight of the purchase increased; a full lb might go for as little as $2K on the street where the authorities would claim a value of $5700.

In practice that meant, whenever the police reported a bust to the public, or the Crown pursued charges in Court, the value of the bust was a bit of an exaggeration.

 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, deicer said:

A reputable news source?????

Seems that those damn conservatives are misleading residents re a cannabis shortage, while in NDP Alberta I guess if the article is to be believed re no shortage, it is the NDPs who are perpetuating news of a shortage.

January 3, 2019 12:41 pm
Updated: January 4, 2019 8:11 am

Cannabis supply slowly improving but not enough to allow more licences: AGLC

emilymertz2018.jpg?quality=60&strip=all& By Emily Mertz Senior News Reporter - Online  Global News
 

Cannabis producers are trying to catch up to overwhelming demand. While supply issues are improving, Alberta Gaming Liquor Cannabis' hold on issuing new retail licences remains.

 

The Alberta regulator in charge of the legal marijuana market says supply is improving, but not enough to start issuing new cannabis licences.

Cannabis was legalized across Canada on Oct. 17, 2018. On Nov. 21, Alberta Gaming Liquor and Cannabis suspended new applications and said it wouldn’t issue any additional cannabis retail licences until further notice.

AGLC said the temporary suspension was required because it had only received 20 per cent of the product it ordered and expected from licensed producers.

READ MORE: AGLC says it’s only received 20% of cannabis ordered from producers; halting new retail licences

On Thursday, the provincial regulator told Global News there are no notable updates to the supply shortage. While it’s slowly getting better, AGLC said it’s not enough to sustain demand and therefore the suspension on new licences remains in place.

“AGLC continues to monitor cannabis supply and is working with our licensed producers to obtain as much product as possible for the Alberta marketplace,” spokesperson Heather Holmen said. “AGLC is also working to bring on newly federally licensed producers as they are approved by Health Canada.

“Although we continue to receive cannabis products, the quantities are not such that we are able to lift the licensing hold at this time.”

“The supply challenges have not entirely been overcome, but largely overcome,” said Allan Rewak, the executive director of the Cannabis Council of Canada, which represents licensed producers.

He confirms there were production challenges navigating the new, complex and highly regulated industry.

READ MORE: Canada-wide cannabis shortages could last years, producers warn

“We’ve faced issues from the logistics and the supply chain elements of production that did create some shortages.

“But I’m pleased to say cannabis remains available, we still have cannabis stockpiled, and we’re working very hard to get that in the hands of our provincial distributors, and through those provincial distributors, retail outlets all across Alberta.”

AGLC has signed contracts with 15 federally licensed cannabis producers. The AGLC website lists 65 licensed cannabis retailers across Alberta — 10 of which are in Edmonton.

As of 11:30 a.m. Thursday, albertacannabis.org had 65 of its 139 products listed as available — as opposed to out of stock. The products available included dried flowers, capsules, pre-rolled joints, oils and seeds.

Seeds for people to grow plants are a fairly new product offering. While they were legal on Oct. 17, they weren’t available right away (most producers do not offer seeds) and the AGLC website just started offering them to consumers a couple of weeks ago.

“Due to the high degree of regulation, things such as the application of excise stamps proved to be a little problematic during the initial stages of legalization,” Rewak said. “Remember, these were all new aspects of the production regime under C-45, which is different from the previous medical system.”Rewak believes Canadians should expect “a remarkably improved system” within six months to a year.

“It is impossible to say with absolute granular certainty when the supply issue will be resolved,” Rewak said. “I think it’s getting better each day. Each week and each month, we’ll see continual improvement as we bring more production online and we get more product out the door.

“What we’ve seen through legalization is an incredible demand for legal cannabis from Canadians. That’s a really positive sign for both the sector and the government.”

Retailers have experienced the challenges meeting demand first-hand.

“There were a few issues with getting supply,” said Ryan Seeras, chief operating officer of Numo Cannabis. “We’ve been open for over a month and we’ve had continuous supply.”

“It’s not been as big of a shipment as we had hoped… but we’ve been open and it’s been kind of a continuous supply.”

Seeras said there were several days where they had to close the store because they ran out of stock but admits the supply situation is getting better.

He would also like to offer customers more options in terms of diversity of strains.

“We do want to offer the best kinds of strains available, but there have been quite a few times where it’s like, well, what is available on the website is what we’re trying to grab,” Seeras said.

READ MORE: More Edmonton Cannabis stores face supply shortages; demand ‘way more than anticipated’

Rewak added that huge demand is also good news for the labour market. By the end of 2018, he estimates 10,500 Canadians were directly employed in the cannabis sector.

“That will grow exponentially,” he said. “There are some estimates that in six to seven years, we’ll see up to 150,000 directly employed in this industry, from processing to retail to production.

“This is one of the most innovative and exciting sectors in the Canadian economy. We’ll create thousands of jobs on a monthly basis.

As the industry evolves, it will include new product categories as well, like vape pens, beverages and edibles, he said.

“There are, I believe, 138 cultivation facilities across the country,” Rewak said. “Six new licences were granted last Friday, but those were for processing facilities that will take and refine cannabis into concentrates, edibles and new product categories.”

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Yes, a reputable news source.

If you had bothered to check, the information is from a link in the article to the Health Canada Cannabis Supply and Demand Report.

Here it is from the article for you:

https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-medication/cannabis/licensed-producers/market-data/supply-demand.html

So the statements in the article are directly from the government report.

Health Canada data shows that for the month of November, there was almost three times more dried cannabis ready to be distributed to retail stores across the country than reported provincial and territorial sales combined. For cannabis oil, it was more than four times more,” Cadieux continued.

These are the findings from November 2018, according to Ottawa’s data:

  • Total sales of dried cannabis in November increased by 22 per cent compared to October (from 7,283 kg to 8,872 kg).

  • Total sales of cannabis oil increased by 14 per cent (from 6,838 litres to 7,805 litres).

  • The total amount of finished dried cannabis products held in inventory at the end of November increased by 27 per cent compared to the end of October (from 20,147 kg to 25,607 kg).

  • The total amount of finished cannabis oil products increased 17 per cent (from 29,054 litres to 33,954 litres).

  • Finished inventory held by provincial and territorial distributors and retailers increased 62 per cent for dried cannabis. In aggregate, this inventory held by provinces and territories was the equivalent of two months' supply of dried cannabis when compared against the volume of non-medical sales in November.

  • Finished inventory held by provincial and territorial distributors and retailers increased by 211 per cent for cannabis oil. In aggregate, this inventory held by provinces and territories was the equivalent of four months' supply of cannabis oil when compared against the volume of non-medical sales in November.

  • Finished inventory held by federal licence holders increased 11 per cent for dried cannabis and decreased 1 per cent for cannabis oil.

So who's lying?  The article, or the governments?

I think it is the governments.  They don't want us to know how successful it has been going into a federal election.

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