Sign in to follow this  
Malcolm

Sharing the cost of legalized Marijuana

Recommended Posts

Another bug, some Provinces will set the age at 18 while others (BC for one) will set it at 19. So if you drive from a Province where it is 18 into one where it is 19, you better be real careful if you under  their legal age and are found to be in possession of some.  Not any different than liquor (different ages)  but I wonder what the penalty will be? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are / will be a user, here is a Province by Province guide for you.

How marijuana will be sold: A provincial glance

NOVA SCOTIA AND PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND ARE THE LATEST PROVINCES TO OUTLINE THEIR PLANS FOR THE SALE OF MARIJUANA WITH LEGALIZATION LOOMING JULY 1. HERE IS A GLANCE AT PROVINCIAL AND TERRITORIAL PLANS TO DATE, MOVING FROM WEST, TO EAST, TO NORTH

  • Calgary Herald
  • 9 Dec 2017
  •  
getimage.aspx?regionKey=OZSkb38n48VBM0AJwHQt2g%3d%3dTHE CANADIAN PRESS/ FILES As Canada’s upcoming legalization of marijuana, slated for next July 1, looms closer, the provinces are finalizing their plans for sales and control.

BRITISH COLUMBIA

B.C. has set the age of consumption at 19, with retail sales allowed through both public and private stores. Retailers will have to get their supply of cannabis from the government’s wholesale distribution system used for alcohol.

ALBERTA

The province plans to control the online sale of pot, but will leave over- thecounter sales to private operators. Details on how sales would work have yet to be determined. Private pot stores would have to be physically separate from stores that sell alcohol, tobacco or pharmaceuticals, but how that would be legally defined is also undetermined. Stores would not be allowed to sell anything but cannabis and cannabis-related products.

SASKATCHEWAN

The province has held a public consultation. Saskatchewan said in its recent throne speech that it will introduce pot legislation once a review is completed this fall.

MANITOBA

Manitoba plans to set its legal age at 19, a year later than the legal age for drinking alcohol. The government’s legislation would also prohibit people from growing cannabis at home for recreational purposes. Manitoba Liquor and Lotteries would regulate the sale of cannabis and municipal governments would have the option to ban sales by referendum.

ONTARIO

The most populous province intends to sell the drug in up to 150 stores run by the Liquor Control Board of Ontario to people 19 and older, with a ban on its consumption in public spaces or workplaces.

QUEBEC

The province has tabled a bill whereby all pot would be sold through the provincially run liquor board, although there is flexibility for exceptions. Quebec plans to open 15 marijuana stores by July 1 and control sales online. The bill also makes it illegal to cultivate pot for personal or commercial use, unless authorized, and limits possession in a home to 150 grams, and to 30 grams on a person. There will also be a zero-tolerance policy for driving under the influence of any drug.

NEW BRUNSWICK

The province will set the minimum age at 19 and require users to lock away their marijuana when it’s in their home. The province announced last month that people would be able to buy marijuana at a subsidiary of the province’s liquor commission.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

P.E.I. has set its legal age at 19, and said it will sell marijuana at standalone outlets run separately by its liquor commission. P.E.I. will allow online sales, and restrict marijuana use to private residences.

NOVA SCOTIA

The government said marijuana will be sold alongside alcohol in its provincial liquor commission stores, and through online sales, to anyone 19 and over. The province accepts federal rules setting a personal possession limit of up to 30 grams, a personal cultivation limit of up to four plants per household and will establish provincial penalties for youth possession of up to five grams.

NFLD. AND LABRADOR

Canada’s newest province will allow sales in private stores with the legal age set at 19. The Crown-owned liquor corporation will oversee the distribution to private retailers. Consumption will be restricted to private residences.

YUKON

The territory has proposed 19 as the minimum age for the consumption of recreational marijuana, and would limit possession to 30 grams. Its proposals would also allow four plants to be grown per household. The public has until Dec. 20 to comment on the proposed framework, which includes initially limiting distribution and sales to government outlets.

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES

The government has been holding discussions with residents that include community meetings and an online survey, which has garnered a record response for a government online consultation tool.

NUNAVUT

Nunavut completed initial stakeholder consultations through the summer of 2017 and was holding a public survey to help guide the development of policy and legislative options.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting, in NB, they want you to lock up your marijuana but not liquor or prescription drugs. 

 
December 11, 2017 9:30 am
Updated: December 11, 2017 9:34 am

Here’s where you’ll be buying marijuana in New Brunswick

alex-2017-e1496427333172.jpg?quality=60&By Alexander QuonOnline Producer/Reporter  Global News

Cannabis seedlings at the new Aurora Cannabis facilty Friday, November 24, 2017 in Montreal.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

- A A +

New Brunswick announced on Monday the name of the retail stores that will sell cannabis to the public — CannabisNB.

The stores will function as a subsidiary of NB Liquor.

“CannabisNB will help us achieve the goals of the legislative framework your government has introduced,” said Finance Minister Cathy Rogers in a press release.

According to the province, a trademark application has been filed for the CannabisNB name.

READ MORE: New Brunswick to sell pot from government stores, will check ID at door

Ahead of the planned legalization of cannabis next year, the province placed a tender for 20 retail location in 15 communities across New Brunswick.

Under the province’s Cannabis Control Act,  the minimum age for buying cannabis will be set at 19, with a requirement that users lock up their marijuana when at home.

Advice from other jurisdictions like Colorado and Washington were reportedly used in shaping the province’s framework.

New Brunswick Liquor president Brian Harriman said in October that identification will be checked at the door of all retail locations and all products will be securely under glass.

WATCH: NB government guaranteeing funding for cannabis education but not profits from salesMORE_NB_CANNABIS_LAWS_(_TOR1BF1R_848x480_1092549187934.jpg?w=670&quality=70&strip=all

Online sales will also be available for pickup at a retail store or home delivery.

Nova Scotia and P.E.I. both set their legal age for marijuana at 19 last week, but are taking different paths on how weed will be sold.

P.E.I. will sell marijuana at stand-alone outlets run separately by its liquor commission, while Nova Scotia said pot will be sold alongside alcohol in its provincial liquor stores.

— With files from the Canadian Press

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now Morneau is justifying legalizing marijuana so that the illegal proceeds won’t be used to finance terrorism!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, st27 said:

Now Morneau is justifying legalizing marijuana so that the illegal proceeds won’t be used to finance terrorism!

I see there is evidently an agreement that the Provinces will get 75% of the Federal sin tax, now of course the municipalities will demand a split of that money.  http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/feds-agree-to-give-provinces-75-per-cent-of-pot-tax-revenues-1.3716551

Now official concern with a shortage of the legal weed.  

December 11, 2017 2:17 pm

Atlantic premiers concerned about marijuana supply, push Ottawa to expedite licensing

By Staff The Canadian Press

New Brunswick Premier Brian Gallant, Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil, Prince Edward Island Premier Wade MacLauchlan, and Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball, left to right, hold a news conference at the end of a meeting of Atlantic Premiers in Halifax on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017.

Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press
- A A +

Atlantic Canada’s premiers say they are worried about obtaining an adequate supply of weed as they move ahead to meet Ottawa’s July 1 deadline for legalized marijuana.

The four premiers called on the federal government to expedite the licensing of suppliers following a meeting today in Halifax.

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil made it clear that ensuring an adequate supply is Ottawa’s responsibility, saying “it’s their timeline and their permitting (regime).”

McNeil warns that if governments can’t supply enough pot, “someone else will,” in a reference to the black market.

Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball says although his province inked a production agreement last week, that alone won’t make product available until 2019.

Prince Edward Island Premier Wade MacLauchlan says ensuring supply is key so governments can sell marijuana of “reliable quality” to the public.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the time the government is finished with the pricing and beauracracy of sales, it will still be cheaper and easier on the street, or you can grow your own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, st27 said:

By the time the government is finished with the pricing and beauracracy of sales, it will still be cheaper and easier on the street, or you can grow your own.

 

The same could be said about other taxes on gasoline and alcohol and tobacco.

It works quite well for governments to tax the hell out of something and it does not diminish demand.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Fido said:

 

The same could be said about other taxes on gasoline and alcohol and tobacco.

It works quite well for governments to tax the hell out of something and it does not diminish demand.

I wonder what the real demand will be? In other words what percent of Canadian Citizens will want to switch to weed from Alcohol? I would bet the number will not be great but then of course we can always rely on marijuana tourists to boost the numbers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:P   :whistling:   :head:   :Furious:

Only the Liberals could lose money selling drugs!

 

“ On the other hand, if the cost in new addiction is as great as the alleged required increases in government anti-addiction budgets suggest, not to mention increases in private anti-addiction budgets, as well, maybe this is a policy change whose net social impact really is negative. If that were true, it shouldn’t be undertaken no matter how many billions in taxes it brings in. Doing bad things for money: we already have the mafia for that. 

 

http://business.financialpost.com/opinion/william-watson-fresh-signs-were-about-to-make-a-big-mistake-legalizing-marijuana

 

 

 

7BC7CC82-66F2-4C82-9DC9-E1A139261DE4.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Canadian doctor groups are warning about the adverse effects of cannabis

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎13, ‎2017, ‏‎10 minutes ago | The Canadian Press

There is little to no research to support the supposed benefits of medical cannabis, and what evidence exists suggests that using marijuana as medicine may do more harm than good, family doctors’ associations across Canada are telling their members.

A trio of advisories prepared by the Alberta College of Family Physicians has been distributed to more than 32,000 clinicians, summarizing the scientific literature, or lack thereof, around medicinal marijuana.

“One thing that was quite consistent was adverse events,” said Dr. Mike Allan, a professor of family medicine at the University of Alberta. “And the benefits, even if they’re real, are much smaller than what people might anticipate.”

Allan co-ordinates the college’s biweekly updates, “Tools for Practice,” which focus on topical issues and are circulated through professional chapters in every province except Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The three most recent updates were inspired by physicians wanting to know more about the research behind medical cannabis. Family doctors are facing increasing pressure from patients asking about medicinal pot and the college wants to ensure its members have the information they need to make informed decisions around treatment, Allan said.

election-california1-jpg-e1513193591817.

“I think this gives (doctors) some comfort, saying, ‘Look, here’s the evidence. It’s actually missing in a lot of places, so I can’t give it for conditions X, Y and Z,’ ” Allan said. He described medical pot as a high-risk product that should only used in rare circumstances when other, safer treatment options have been exhausted.

Health Canada data show the number of clients registered with licensed medical marijuana producers jumped to more than 200,000 as of June 2017, which is about 2.7 times greater than the 75,166 people registered at the same time last year. Registrations more than tripled in both 2016 and 2015.

“The decision to use cannabis for medical purposes is one that is made between patients and their health-care practitioners, and does not involve Health Canada,” department spokeswoman Tammy Jarbeau said Tuesday in an email.

Health Canada published a lengthy information bulletin for medical professionals about the benefits and harms of medical marijuana, topped with a disclaimer warning that cannabis is not an approved therapeutic product and the department does not endorse its use. The document was last updated in 2013.

The first advisory prepared by Alberta’s family physicians college, which was released Nov. 14, says the evidence is “too sparse and poor” to conclude that marijuana is effective at relieving pain. The second document, released two weeks later, describes “adverse effects” as one of the only consistent findings of the existing studies. These harms included hallucinations, paranoia, dizziness and low blood pressure.

The research likely underestimates the frequency of adverse outcomes because most studies involve patients who have a history of using pot so are less likely than the average person to experience any negative side effects, Allan said.

Some studies indicate marijuana can reduce nausea for chemotherapy patients and control spastic muscle contractions in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is virtually no evidence of any effect on chronic anxiety or glaucoma, as is commonly cited by industry advocates.

“Some of the pain studies go for nothing more … than five, six hours. And this is for chronic pain,” Allan said. “It’s hard to get a great feel for how someone is going to do long term on a medicine after five, six hours.”

The only evidence of marijuana being used to treat glaucoma is a single randomized study conducted on six patients, he added.

“We would kind of be putting the cart before the horse if we started to prescribe this without the research,” Allan said.

Philippe Lucas, head of the Canadian Medical Cannabis Council, applauded the college for its efforts to inform the medical community about the benefits and risks of medicinal cannabis, but said he was concerned about what he saw as a bias toward highlighting the harms.

“I’d be the last person to suggest that cannabis was entirely safe or entirely appropriate for every individual,” said Lucas, who is also an executive with Canadian marijuana producer Tilray.

Many patients use marijuana as a substitute for other pharmaceutical drugs, such as opiates, and limiting access to cannabis could hinder efforts to combat the opioid overdose crisis, he said.

Medical colleges have released some general guidelines for primary-care providers about prescribing marijuana. Documents released by the colleges of physicians and surgeons in both British Columbia and Alberta cite the absence of reliable evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of cannabis as medication.

The Alberta college is helping put together more comprehensive provincial guidelines for prescribing medical cannabis, which it expects to release by March, Allan said.

b.gif?host=nationalpost.com&blog=3797918

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One needs to ask.  Why have the studies not been carried out?  Cannabis has been around a VERY long time.  Why are the pharmaceutical companies not doing studies....Oh yeah.  they cannot patent it and make a boatload of money.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, boestar said:

One needs to ask.  Why have the studies not been carried out?  Cannabis has been around a VERY long time.  Why are the pharmaceutical companies not doing studies....Oh yeah.  they cannot patent it and make a boatload of money.

 

Or perhaps the size of the test base was too small.  To do a Double Blind Test you need a number of things including $$$$. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taking Cannabis or Alcohol or Morphine releaves the pain by masking it.  None of those cure anything.

It is just Doctor Feel-Good medicine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Fido said:

Taking Cannabis or Alcohol or Morphine releaves the pain by masking it.  None of those cure anything.

It is just Doctor Feel-Good medicine.

correct.  sometimes there is no cure so making someone comfortable is the best course.  Morphine is highly addictive with many side effects.  Alcohol is...well alcohol we all know the effects.  Cannabis is a happy medium relief without the side effects and addiction issues of Morphine. (Psychotropic vs Physical)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, boestar said:

correct.  sometimes there is no cure so making someone comfortable is the best course.  Morphine is highly addictive with many side effects.  Alcohol is...well alcohol we all know the effects.  Cannabis is a happy medium relief without the side effects and addiction issues of Morphine. (Psychotropic vs Physical)

Evidently there are adverse side effects.

Quote

The first advisory prepared by Alberta's family physicians college, which was released Nov. 14, says the evidence is "too sparse and poor" to conclude that marijuana is effective at relieving pain. The second document, released two weeks later, describes "adverse effects" as one of the only consistent findings of the existing studies. These harms included hallucinations, paranoia, dizziness and low blood pressure.

The research likely underestimates the frequency of adverse outcomes because most studies involve patients who have a history of using pot so are less likely than the average person to experience any negative side effects, Allan said.  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/research-lacking-on-medical-pot-alberta-doctors-1.4448015?cmp=rss

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and yet MILLIONS of people smoke it every day with no ill effects.  The Big Pharma companies don't want it out there because it is a cheap alternative that they cannot control the price of.

Talk to a patient undergoing chemo and radiation therapy.  Pot has a calming effect on the body and relives the nausea and pain associated.  Lowering blood pressure can also be a good thing since elevated blood pressure can be a side effect from treatment.  

Anecdotal evidence be damned people will try to stop this

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same sort of denial when harsher driving rules were introduced for those under the influence of alcohol. 

‎Today, ‎December ‎19, ‎2017, ‏‎12 minutes ago
 

Many cannabis users aren’t convinced that marijuana causes impaired driving: survey

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎19, ‎2017, ‏‎45 minutes ago | Maura Forrest

OTTAWA — A new Health Canada survey shows that Canadians are hazy on the risks of driving high.

Only half of respondents who had consumed cannabis in the last year felt that marijuana use affects driving, according to the Canadian Cannabis Survey, released Tuesday, compared to 75 per cent of all respondents. Another 24 per cent said it depends, while 19 per cent said cannabis doesn’t affect driving.

Of those who had used marijuana in the last 12 months, 39 per cent said they had driven within two hours of consuming cannabis at some point in their lives. Forty per cent of those said they had done it in the previous 30 days, and 15 per cent said they had driven after using cannabis in combination with alcohol. Only two per cent reported an interaction with police related to driving under the influence.

The survey results come as Ottawa grapples with how best to crack down on impaired driving after marijuana is legalized, which the Trudeau government has promised will happen by July 2018.

“Driving while impaired by cannabis or other drugs is dangerous and illegal,” said Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale in a statement on Tuesday. “The message is simple — don’t drive high.”

Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor said the results “reinforce why we have invested in targeted public education and awareness efforts.” The federal government has announced $46 million over the next five years to be spent on education, awareness and surveillance related to cannabis use.

But Conservative justice critic Michael Cooper said the findings show the government’s public awareness campaign “has been a failure.”

“It barely got off the ground until the fall,” he said, adding that when the Liberals’ marijuana legislation was before committee this fall, several witnesses testified about “misconceptions amongst the public about the impact of marijuana use.”

Under Bill C-46, which sets out major changes to Canada’s impaired driving laws in anticipation of marijuana legalization, people found to have two nanograms of THC (the primary psychoactive in cannabis) per millilitre of blood within two hours of driving could be fined up to $1,000, while those with more than five nanograms could face up to 10 years in jail.

But critics have argued there is no clear correlation between the amount of THC in the blood and the level of impairment, which can vary widely from person to person. “What it could mean is that some individuals who really aren’t impaired are going to be caught and other people who are impaired are going to get away with drug-impaired driving,” said Cooper.

He said the survey results show that Canada isn’t ready for legal pot on July 1, 2018. “When legalization comes into effect, more Canadians are going to be consuming marijuana and more Canadians are going to be on our roads driving impaired,” he said. “This is a rushed and arbitrary timeline.”

Overall, just 22 per cent of respondents said they used cannabis in the previous 12 months for non-medical purposes, with those aged 16 to 24 about twice as likely to have used the drug in the past year. Of those, most reported using cannabis fewer than three days per month, while 18 per cent said they used cannabis daily. On average, they spent nearly $75 a month on cannabis products, with women spending less than men.

The survey specifically targeted marijuana users, so the results are not representative of the overall population.

Nearly 80 per cent of respondents believed that cannabis can be habit-forming, though that number drops to 64 per cent among recent users. About half felt that pot has a positive effect on mood, creativity, anxiety and sleep, while about 60 per cent believe it has a negative effect on motivation, memory, concentration, attention and decision-making.

The survey also shows that smoking is still the preferred method of consuming cannabis. In total, 94 per cent of respondents who had used cannabis in the previous year had smoked it, while 34 per cent consumed edibles, 20 per cent used a vape pen and 14 per cent used a vaporizer.

Respondents were also asked about their attitudes to alcohol, cannabis and tobacco. While more than half felt that alcohol is completely socially acceptable, only 28 per cent felt the same about smoking pot and consuming edibles, and just 19 per cent felt the same about tobacco.

The survey was conducted between March and May 2017, and included responses from 9,215 people aged 16 and older. Of those, 2,650 respondents said they had used cannabis in the previous 12 months, either for medical or recreational purposes.

Both of the Liberals’ bills related to marijuana legalization are now before the Senate. 

• Email: mforrest@postmedia.com | Twitter: MauraForrest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trudeau says no idea when July 01 came from. Did he say it or did the press create him saying July 01?

December 19, 2017 7:04 pm
Updated: December 19, 2017 7:26 pm

Trudeau says legal pot is coming ‘next summer,’ not necessarily July 1

By Staff The Canadian Press

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses participants at a Liberal Party donor appreciation event, in Ottawa, Tuesday, December 12, 2017.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand
 

MONTREAL – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says “next summer,” and not July 1, is the date cannabis will become legal across the country.

Excerpts of an interview Trudeau gave the TVA network in Quebec were broadcast Tuesday, with the full interview to be shown Wednesday night.

Trudeau shook his head when interviewer Pierre Bruneau asked him why he was so obsessed with July 1 as the date for the cannabis legislation to become law.

The prime minister said it “would not be July 1,” but that it would be “for next summer.”

“The date will not be July 1, I can assure you of that,” Trudeau said. “I don’t know where that date came from.”

Several provinces have asked the federal government to delay passing the legislation in order to give them more time to prepare.

A statement issued by the Health Department last month said, “as previously indicated, the government of Canada intends to bring the proposed Cannabis Act into force no later than July 2018.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

do they really think that just because its legal that MORE people will start smoking it?  I am not sure that will be the case.

However training and measure are being put in place to police driving under the influence of drugs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Booze or pot, both have their effects.  As long as law enforcement has ways and means  to enforce 'impairment' the bonus of this is that the government will be collecting their cut through taxes and hopefully it will take the pressure off other taxed areas.

You won't get rid of pot, in the same way they couldn't get rid of booze,  so isn't it better to regulate it and profit off it rather than the criminal element benefiting?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017-12-20 at 7:29 AM, deicer said:

and hopefully it will take the pressure off other taxed areas.

 

 

Do you seriously believe this? 

Edited by Jaydee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this