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Malcolm

Marijuana

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As I wrote the previous post, my Beagle trapped a mouse under the BBQ, if your dedication to the outcome stands as firm and resoulute as his appears to be, I have no issue with this... and, as is the case with him, I see no reason to either intrude or judge the outcome. Best of luck to all players. So far, the mouse stands resolute and unmoved, I expect no less from liberals.

PS: SITREP- the mouse escaped when he switched his attention to a large (Ontario import) squirrel... although an experienced hunting dog, I fear he displays liberal tendencies; lack of focus and attention to detail. Hats off to the mouse, he reinforces my belief that if you don't have a viable plan it may be best, in the short run, to do nothing. In this case, his (the dog's) math, time appreciation and tactical acumen didn't work out. Hopefully, your's is better.

Edited by Wolfhunter

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This all comes back to decriminalization as opposed to legalization.  2 totally different things.

decriminalization involves the removal of the part of the law with regards to possession for personal use.  End of political involvement.

Legalization involves all kinds of red tape and debate which will eventually get completely screwed up by whoever is in charge (history dictates liberals and conservatives screw up fairly equally over time) This ends up costing the taxpayer far more heavily.

Now I am pretty sure that a relatively equal number of conservatives and liberals partake of the plant. So this is really a bipartisan issue isn't it?  

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“ But Trudeau also said it’s important to remember that marijuana is a controlled substance that’s being legalized to protect children and communities.”  ??????????????????????

Justin Trudeau cautions Canadians to be wary about toking before they travel

The PM said the recreational use of marijuana could have consequences for Canadians crossing the border into the U.S.

 

WINNIPEG — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is sounding a cautionary note about the recreational use of marijuana, saying that consuming it could have consequences for Canadians crossing the border into the United States.

Trudeau made the comment during an interview on CBC Manitoba hours before a visit to Winnipeg.

He was posed a question from a listener, who wanted to know what he would say to a U.S. border guard if he was asked if he had ever tried cannabis.

Trudeau replied that while he’s never told a fib while crossing the border, Canadians who have used marijuana will have to consider how they would respond.

The recreational use of marijuana in Canada officially becomes legal on Oct. 17, and the prime minister says his government is working with the American officials to ensure that travel to the U.S. does not become a problem as a result of the change.

They have legalized marijuana in a number of their states and we're trying to make sure that travel between our two countries is not disrupted

 

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection office said in a statement earlier this year that medical and recreational marijuana may be legal in some U.S. states, but it remains illegal under U.S. federal law.

“I’ve never lied to a border guard,” Trudeau told the CBC on Tuesday, while also noting that every country has the right to decide who crosses their borders.

“I certainly won’t work to assume or impress upon the U.S. who they have to let in or not. They have legalized marijuana in a number of their states and we’re trying to make sure that travel between our two countries is not disrupted.”

But Trudeau also said it’s important to remember that marijuana is a controlled substance that’s being legalized to protect children and communities.

“It’s not a health food supplement. Choosing to partake of marijuana has consequences for individuals, for lives in different ways, and we’re not encouraging that.”

The legalization issue is expected to be on the agenda when Trudeau meets with Progressive Conservative Premier Brian Pallister during his visit to the Manitoba capital.

The meeting will come one day after the Pallister cabinet announced hefty fines for people who break Manitoba’s rules on cannabis consumption, including a $2,542 penalty for those who grow cannabis plants at home, supply it to an underage person or sell it without a licence.

The federal government has pushed to have homegrown pot allowed, but Manitoba and Quebec have fought the move and insisted the provinces have the right to restrict it.

“We truly believe that allowing people to grow a small quantity at home for personal consumption is a part of removing the black market and keeping our communities safe,” Trudeau said.

“The province has picked a different path and we’re going to see how we work that out.” (CBC, The Canadian Press)

https://nationalpost.com/news/world/prime-minister-cautions-canadians-to-be-wary-about-toking-before-travel

 

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Edited by Jaydee
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I'm not a smoker (of any kind) but it will be interesting to see if this holds. I can't see how it is legal for a company to ban something that you do on your own time - provided you are not under the influence when you show up for work (or the legal definition of influence).

SUppose someone could say it is their religious right :)

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“Air Canada is allowed to make those decisions,” Transport Minsiter Marc Garneau said Friday. “They could be challenged, but they’re allowed to make them.

“From our point of view, from a safety point of view, we already have measures in place to ensure that the crew of an airplane — and I’m not just talking about the pilots; also the flight attendants — are fit to fly.”

Not to worry, Marc and the boy's have it covered?

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My understanding is the RCAF policy is very prescriptive (28 days) for two work groups - pilots and submariners. They haven’t stated it publicly but I’m left wondering if there’s some science behind it relating to the delayed release of THC from the cells back into the bloodstream under certain physiological situations such as changing air pressure or elevated stress. 

In any case, I can’t blame AC for taking this approach. TC seems incapable of providing any level of rules (or even guidance) in advance of the legalization so why not go for broke and let the legal beagles hash it out should someone decide to challenge it. I gotta say, I wouldn’t want to be a big wig in the pilot’s or mechanics unions taking on that challenge. Imagine the headlines. 

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And then comes the company demand for mandatory & random testing.

Then again, if the employer is prepared to pay a whole lot more to employees in safety sensitive positions in return for their acceptance of this new invasion of privacy, then I think it might be okay?

It's funny that Air Canada hasn't acted anywhere near as quickly when it comes to flight duty regs? 

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Flight and duty regs cost money because you need more pilots.  If AC could ban alcohol and tobacco, they'd do that too because doing so would save them money. Same with this.

There won't be a need for random drug testing.  There will be testing if there is ever a mishap.  I am not an insider, but my sense is that any crew member who tests positive after an incident will have zero indemnification from the company.  There won't be any grey. 

Just my opinion.

Vs

 

 

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1 hour ago, J.O. said:

My understanding is the RCAF policy is very prescriptive (28 days) for two work groups - pilots and submariners. 

Yup, 28 days prohibition for aircrew, 24 hours for Maintenance personnel. Here’s the order:

https://mobile.caf-fac.ca/canforgens/page.php?path=data/2018/151-18_e.asp

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The Supreme Court has already ruled that random drug testing by employers is unconstitutional. Testing must be supported by a reasonable suspicion or when an event such as an accident occurs. 

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1 hour ago, conehead said:

Yup, 28 days prohibition for aircrew, 24 hours for Maintenance personnel. Here’s the order:

https://mobile.caf-fac.ca/canforgens/page.php?path=data/2018/151-18_e.asp

Basically that would mean a pilot on  any Squadron, could never do the drug. Seldom does any "active" pilot get more than 28 days off in a row. DND  has stopped the movement of pilots about every three years and more and more pilots are just going from Squadron to Squadron and could have 8-10 years of constant flying.

If I was still in I would not have a problem with that because I have never ingested recreational drugs but I did leave a Loadmaster in Lahr when he turned up reeking of "Mary-Jane".:biggrin1:

To me, the most interesting thing about legalizing MJ is what is going to happen when the first "pot head" drives 'fully loaded' and kills someone ???

I may be in the minority but I don't think legalizing the drug was the answer.

 

 

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Agree Kip - they have not completely thought out how to deal with driving aspect. If fact, a judge in my local area recently lamented that the number of drunk driver cases he is seeing has never been so high! It seems people don't care or believe it is their 'right' to smoke or drink and then drive. There are so many cases clogging the legal system in Alberta that they are decriminalizing drunk driving. Wonderful.

But lets ban guns! They are the real problem.

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Yes, drunk driving offences are increasing across the country.  And, I just read that most police forces are NOT ordering the recommended roadside detectors for cannibis, as they are unreliable.  

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Unreliable and untested in the Courts.

 

Trader ... I think someone's pulling your leg?

Impaired driving is an offence described in the Criminal Code of 'Canada'. A province cannot choose to opt out of the Federal Law.

 

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To which was added items on police, impaired driving etc. I have restarted your topic in the Aviation forum and copied all aviation related replies to it. 

 

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On 9/28/2018 at 10:05 PM, J.O. said:

The Supreme Court has already ruled that random drug testing by employers is unconstitutional. Testing must be supported by a reasonable suspicion or when an event such as an accident occurs. 

several years ago when being recalled from a layoff some guys failed the Urine test for THC.  Their return to work was conditional on 6 months of random testing.   They call you come period.  failure of the test resulted in dismissal.

 

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Thanks Trader.

I'm shocked and can't imagine how this will work.

If the criminal code says you're a criminal at .08, it's hard to imagine how a Province can say something different?

 

 

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