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Liberals’ new rescue aircraft could take two days to effect a North Pole rescue

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Liberals’ new rescue aircraft could take two days to reach North Pole in disaster operation: documents

May 8, 2017 - National Post
David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen

Canada’s new search and rescue aircraft could take up to two days to reach survivors of a disaster at the North Pole but the Canadian military doesn’t have a problem with that, according to recently filed court documents.

A legal battle is now underway in the Federal Court in Ottawa over the Liberal government’s $4.7-billion fixed-wing search-and-rescue aircraft program.

The Italian aerospace firm, Leonardo, is angry that its C-27J aircraft, which it contends could reach the North Pole in a single flight from a military base in Winnipeg, was rejected by the federal government.

The winning aircraft, the Airbus C-295, is slower and would take two days to reach a disaster site at the North Pole or similar Arctic locations, Leonardo’s representatives argue.

The company is asking the court to overturn the contract to Airbus and instead award the lucrative deal to Leonardo and its Canadian partners.

In its affidavit, Leonardo alleges the Airbus aircraft fails to meet the government’s basic criteria since it can’t conduct a mission to the outer regions of the military’s allotted rescue area within 13 flying hours.

But that isn’t a problem, according to the latest response to the court from the federal government. In fact, there are no time constraints as long as the aircraft is capable of flying to that location and staying at the scene for an hour and then returning to an airfield, the government argues.

'If someone needs help, the last thing you want to do is have an eight- or 10-hour delay'

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I guess a good question would be: how long did the aircraft they are replacing take? Less time, more time, in other words better or worse performance?

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The aircraft procurement process is hopelessly flawed by the same sort of stupid that flows from every department of this very incompetent government.

Did anyone notice that Canada's lying Minister of Defense hasn't resigned yet?

Oh well, his antics are just another demonstration of the absence of integrity that exists within the Liberal government?

 

 

 

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It's not just the Air Force and the Navy that is neglected. Not too many nations would try re-fit a 50 year old ship:

Why Ottawa yanked a Coast Guard ship out of $4M refit

10/8 - Hamilton, Ont. – The Government of Canada is pulling the plug on the much-delayed refit of the venerable Canadian Coast Guard Ship Hudson. CBC News has learned the Coast Guard towed the Hudson out of an Ontario shipyard Friday with the $4-million refit unfinished. 

The ocean science research ship arrived at Heddle Marine in Hamilton, Ont., in December 2016 for maintenance work that was supposed to be completed in May. The Coast Guard won't say what went wrong and can't say when the ship will be back in service.

"The Canadian Coast Guard and Public Services and Procurement Canada have worked closely with Heddle Marine to manage delays in the scheduled maintenance of the CCGS Hudson, and to bring her back into service in a reasonable time frame. Despite those efforts, the work has not been completed," spokesperson Vance Chow said in an emailed response to questions from CBC News. 

On Friday, the 91-metre ship was towed across Hamilton Harbor to the Canada Centre for Inland Waters — a federal facility in Burlington — "to await the completion of the maintenance work required before she can return to service." The Coast Guard says new timelines for the ship's return to service are currently under review. 

The refit included overhauling the superstructure and masts, blasting and recoating the hull, replacing steel and repairing the rudder. 

When CBC News revealed the refit delays in August, the company said it had been instructed by the Coast Guard not to discuss the situation. Heddle Marine spokesperson Shaun Padulo emailed a short statement in response to CBC News inquiries on Friday about the end of the refit. 

"Although there were a number of challenges faced during the dry docking of the CCGS Hudson which led to delays in the completion of the work, Canada has accepted all of the completed work," Padulo wrote.

The Coast Guard has not responded to a request to explain the nature of the refit delay, how much work remains on the refit or who will pay. 

In an update to employees via email this week the department said it is unclear what impact the ship's "sitting around for so long" will have on completing the final stages of the refit. 

The delay has already forced the cancellation of scientific cruises scheduled for the storied Hudson, which is Canada's premier marine research vessel. The 54-year-old workhorse was supposed to be replaced several years ago, but that too has been delayed. 

CBC

 

 

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Another sad commentary on the state of our national assets which have been ignored by governments for far too long:

Feds ask industry for icebreaking help amid concerns about Canadian CG’s fleet

11/3 - Ottawa, Ont. – Canada’s federal government has turned to the private sector for help in keeping the country’s waters free of ice during the winter months amid concerns about the state of Canada’s icebreaking fleet.

Companies were invited Tuesday to submit proposals for the provision of icebreaking services to the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway, which coast guard officials would call upon as needed. But while the government said the measure was intended to address a “short-term need,” the reality is that the coast guard could end up needing outside help for years. 

That is because the Canadian Coast Guard’s icebreakers are nearing the end of their original 40-year life expectancies, with the average vessel already 35 years old. Upgrades have been promised to keep the icebreakers in the water as long as possible, but only one is scheduled for replacement over the next decade through the federal shipbuilding plan.

Officials privately warned Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc last year that each passing day the ships stay in the water increases the risk of a breakdown, with 1,595 operational days lost in 2013-14.

“Operating aging vessels is challenging, as older ships break down more frequently and cost more to repair,” LeBlanc was told in a briefing note obtained through the Access to Information Act. “This issue is particularly acute for the coast guard’s aging and overburdened icebreakers. There is only one polar icebreaker in the current funded plan.”

That new polar icebreaker, CCGS John G. Diefenbaker, was originally expected to be in the water this year, but delays and scheduling conflicts have pushed delivery back to sometime in the next decade. 

In last week’s economic update, the Liberal government did commit to investing an additional $1.2 billion over five years into the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the coast guard. But none of that new money is slated for icebreakers, even though officials told LeBlanc that such services were “critical to the safe, economical and efficient movement of ships in Canadian waters.” 

The coast guard has faced more demand for its icebreaking services in recent years than ever before, even as its ships get older, because of changing ice conditions and activity in the Arctic. 

“There is no doubt that more investment in the coast guard fleet is required, specifically for icebreakers,” LeBlanc was told. “Industry demands newer and more capable icebreaking vessels, as well as increasing the quantity and capacity of vessels to support year-round operations.” 

The Canadian Press

 

 

The defense and care of this country is being neglected by a government that is too concerned about the welfare of people that haven't even arrived in this country (yet).

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They should just cut the CCGS John G. Diefenbaker into pieces and dispose of it and its plans just on principle.

 

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