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Jaydee

Kathleen Wynne Time Expired !

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Ford's reply should be "when pigs can fly".

Liberals hopeful that Ford might let them keep their official party status despite not winning enough seats

The party will face financial challenges, both in and out of the legislature, which the loss of party status will aggravate, says Malloy

 

TORONTO — Ontario’s outgoing Liberals made a pitch to hold on to official party status Friday as they entered a period of extreme uncertainty in the wake of an election that took them from a majority government to a mere seven seats.

Kathleen Wynne, who stepped down as Liberal leader after the party’s dramatic downfall, said she hopes premier-designate Doug Ford will change the rules to grant the designation, which currently requires eight seats in the legislature.

“I think it’s important,” she said. “I hope that Mr. Ford will agree.”

Ford only said he would talk to his team about the issue in the days and weeks to come.

Being a recognized party in the legislature allows parties to have an office for their leader and access resources such as research assistance, but the threshold required for the designation can be changed by legislators, as has been in the past.

The loss of that status is “one more indignity” to the Liberals as they try to rebuild following a devastating defeat that propelled the Progressive Conservatives to power for the first time in 15 years and elevated the New Democrats to the official Opposition, said Jonathan Malloy, a political science professor at Carleton University.

“They’ve been laid lower than they’ve ever been before, (their loss) is not the single worst disaster for a major political party in Canada but it ranks up there,” he said.

We need to reconnect with each other now that the election is over and with our communities and use that same capacity that we have had for many, many years to rebuildtwitter_solo.svg

“I absolutely think the Ontario Liberal party is coming back, I have no doubt about that but it’s going to be a long road for them … they’re going to need some time to lick their wounds, to retool, to identify a new leadership.”

The party will face financial challenges, both in and out of the legislature, which the loss of party status will aggravate, he said. The legislative assembly’s internal economy board sets aside funds each year to be distributed among official parties.

It’s unlikely the NDP would support loosening the rules around party status considering they were denied a similar reprieve under the Liberals in 2003, Malloy said.

New Democrats were granted some accommodations at the time, including some funding, and earned party status the following year when leader Andrea Horwath won a byelection.

“I don’t really see why the NDP would want to give anything to the Liberals now…memories are long in politics,” Malloy said.

Horwath was pressed on the issue Friday and would only say that the decision was Ford’s to make. “The people gave the Liberals seven seats, that’s what they have in the legislature and that’s what they’re going to have to deal with,” she said.

The Liberals, who had faced voter anger over rising hydro bills and questionable government spending among other issues, said they would weigh their next steps. Asked how long she believes the party will need to recover, Wynne said regardless of the timeline, the work must begin now.“We need to reconnect with each other now that the election is over and with our communities and use that same capacity that we have had for many, many years to rebuild,” she said. “I can’t tell you how long that’s going to take but our target is four years.”

The party’s president, Brian Johns, said the process to select an interim leader from the seven caucus members was underway, though he declined to say how long it would take or when the party would begin looking for a permanent successor to Wynne.

Former Liberal cabinet minister John Milloy, now a professor of public ethics at Wilfrid Laurier University, said the last thing the party should do is rush to select a permanent leader.

People are exhausted and resources are thin following the campaign, he said, and the party would do better to bide its time.

“I would think that they’d want to consolidate, get their feet under them, figure out how they’re going to operate in the legislature,” he said.

“I could see them choosing … the middle option — someone who’s going to carry the ball for a while and then you sort of have a convention closer to the next election, in a couple of years, where you could actually showcase someone.”

While it’s too early to name contenders to lead the Liberals into the next election, the party has several options to hold the fort before then, he said.

I absolutely think the Ontario Liberal party is coming back, I have no doubt about that but it's going to be a long road for them ... they're going to need some time to lick their wounds, to retool, to identify a new leadershiptwitter_solo.svg

If the Liberals want a “seasoned hand” to act as the party’s caretaker, legislator Michael Gravelle would be a good choice and is respected within the party, he said. Or they could pick among their younger legislators if they want a fresh face who may eventually seek to take up the mantle permanently, he said.

Either way, the party will need to be creative to shore up excitement on a shoestring budget, he said, noting the upcoming federal election will provide an opportunity to capitalize on the federal party’s brand and keep Liberal flames alive.

The Tory majority could play in the party’s favour if the new government proves ineffective or starts making mistakes, he added.

“But the biggest challenge that I think the provincial Liberals have is they’re going to have to differentiate themselves from the New Democratic Party and I think quite frankly that was one of the issues (in the election).”

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Quote

Ontario’s election was not ‘historic’

ELECTION OF FIRST GREEN POLITICIAN? IT’S HAD A GOVERNMENT FULL OF THEM IN THE LIBERALS

  • National Post (Latest Edition)
  • 9 Jun 2018
  • Rex Murphy
getimage.aspx?regionKey=G0FI2%2fEGrrOzWNXLohg9Xg%3d%3dKENNETH ARMSTRONG / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILES Green Party of Ontario Leader Mike Schreiner with federal Green Party Leader Elizabeth May in his home riding of Guelph.

People may recall when “historic” was reserved for events of mighty significance, outstanding in their singularity and magnitude of effect — Charles Martel defeating the Moors in 732, the barbarian invasions that brought about the fall of Rome, Nelson at Trafalgar or, closer to our time, the ferocious Battle of Stalingrad, the great hinge combat of the Second World War.

Friday morning as I glissaded over Google to sample the highs and lows of Doug Ford’s triumph in Ontario, it was oddly apparent that most of the press and commentariat saw within the evening’s results something worthy of being called historic. I better be clear. It wasn’t the election itself that grabbed the adjective, though you could make a trivial case for it. After all, the Tories self-detonated their party just as the contest began, suffered the manic divisions of an extemporaneous leadership race, chose what better minds viewed as a dread populist Trump wannabe, and yet still wiped the board. That was remarkable, surprising even, but not really historic.

It was the election of a Green candidate in Guelph that a thousand laptops proclaimed as historic. First-ever Green elected in Ontario — historic win. The Toronto Star, usually rationing its exuberance for matters genetically Liberal, went with the tide: “Green Party Leader Mike Schreiner makes history with victory in Guelph.”

What would the headlines have read if Ontario had elected two? One can but speculate. The great organs of world opinion and news would have worn such headlines as: World Staggers. UN Convenes Security Council. Trump Cancels Kim Summit, Will Meet Ontario Greens To Revise New World Order. Or, perhaps taken a slightly more subdued reading with something like “Great Hopes From Guelph. This is the moment when the rise of the oceans begins to slow and our planet begins to heal.” But part of that, I believe, is taken.

The chosen one himself, Green Leader Mike Schreiner, quite understandably was in consort with the mass judgment, exclaiming over his victory, “We’ve made history.” But, really, did they? Was it, really, historic? Guelph, for those marooned in the lesser provinces, is best understood as a kind of inland Salt Spring Island, a veritable nursery and greenhouse of save-the-planetism and millenarian global warming. It boasts an environmental movement near Calvinist in its determinacy and dourness.

“Historic” has gone the way of “awesome.” Just as “like” is a verbal hiccup, “historic” is a mere sound, a pothole filler on the journalistic highway, meaning if anything, “Hey, this is the first time that’s happened.” E.g., “Went to Rabba’s for a Kit Kat. They were out.” Historic.

Actually, there wasn’t much historic about the entire evening. The Liberals were savagely rejected. How could they not have been? Their rule is best described as insanely haughty and prescriptive. They imposed a centrally driven and coterie agenda on an entire province, ransacked the idea of accountability, chose righteousness over regard for the electorate, and most fatally, abandoned all the real duties of governance for a feverish and total embrace of the destructive and always delusionary climate-change agenda.

The fate of the Ontario Liberals is an “evidence-based” illustration of what happens to a political party when it is captured by Greenism. Inevitably it becomes a Father Knows Best government, ignores or dismisses real and present concerns of an electorate, and scorns the lesser obligations of governance: traffic, home heating, jobs and — every government’s principal reason for being — respect for life as it is being lived by its citizens. Add Greenism to furious “rights” mongering and social-justice infatuations, and you produce a government so far out of touch, that given half a chance, an electorate will leap in gymnastic urgency to any alternative, however dubious or untried.

Ontario did not elect its “first” Green politician Thursday night. It has had a whole government of Green politicians — named Liberals — for the past 15 years. For which Doug Ford is now infinitely thankful.

 

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4 hours ago, Malcolm said:

captured by Greenism. Inevitably it becomes a Father Knows Best government, ignores or dismisses real and present concerns of an electorate, and scorns the lesser obligations of governance: traffic, home heating, jobs and — every government’s principal reason for being — respect for life as it is being lived by its citizens.

Rex Murphy can really write a column.

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yep.  we call it democracy.  For the people by the people.  the people spoke....finally

 

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Abject defeat will even look better when the Pied Piper and his clan go over the cliff next year.

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Canadians should stop blaming Trump for making his country attractive to business. The blame for this BS lies directly at Trudeau’s and Wynn’s feet for their job killing policies. Sad to see a company this size not stay and give Fords government a chance .

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The article did state they were streamlining operations and closing another plant in the south......I’m sure these Canadian ex-employees won’t be looking fwd to the carbon tax.

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Sad isn't it that a corporation can just pick up and head off to greener pastures while the rest of us remain stuck in the trudeau liberal rut.

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6 minutes ago, st27 said:

Sorry...liberal thread drift...You can close the thread but we still suffer from her legacy.

**bleep** happens but then it is time to move on. 

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On 11/1/2018 at 6:40 PM, Malcolm said:

Surely it is time for this thread to be closed.  Time has moved on.

I respectfully disagree. Closing this thread is akin to moving statues. We should learn from history, not try and delete it because it happened in the past.  IMO This thread should be left fully intact as a reminder of all things horrible the Liberals did to Ontario.

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1 hour ago, Jaydee said:

I respectfully disagree. Closing this thread is akin to moving statues. We should learn from history, not try and delete it because it happened in the past.  IMO This thread should be left fully intact as a reminder of all things horrible the Liberals did to Ontario.

Closing the thread does not remove the comments ……

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3 hours ago, Malcolm said:

Closing the thread does not remove the comments ……

IMO, this statue deserves to have birds “sitting” on it for a long time to come, lest we forget. As was the case with Winn, JT stands as proof that Liberal voters have short memories and don't want what they say they do once they get it (like carbon taxes).  We also need to remember the violence with which they oppose political debate. Off topic to be sure but a spoke in the same wheel and well worth remembering at election time.  

https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/12-arrested-as-protest-of-ex-trump-aide-steve-bannon-turns-violent-in-t-o

Edited by Wolfhunter

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Successive ( LIBERAL) Ontario governments increased net debt from $139 billion to $338 billion

 

“ However, perhaps the most telling explanation of how Ontario under successive governments since 2003 ran up its provincial net debt from $139 billion to $338 billion—while incurring deficits over 80 per cent of the time—came from former premier Kathleen Wynne in a recent Globe and Mail interview. Wynne lamented the new government’s emphasis on the deficit because “balancing the budget doesn’t inherently mean you’re building anything.”

This simple statement summarizes much of what went wrong under the governments of Dalton McGuinty and Kathleen Wynne—an attitude that there always must be more government spending for something positive to happen. And if the goal was noble, it didn’t matter how much was spent.”

 

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/blogs/successive-ontario-governments-increased-net-debt-from-139-billion-to-338-billion

 

 

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You're stuck with me': Wynne keeps focus as PCs hike threshold for party status

Former Premier Kathleen Wynne says she’s sticking around as an MPP – for now – even as the Progressive Conservative government paves the way for her exit.

“You’re stuck with me,” Wynne joked with reporters on Tuesday.

Wynne, who led the Liberals to defeat in June, has been a constant fixture in the legislature, asking questions of Premier Doug Ford, defending her record and even introducing a private member’s bill.

While Wynne hasn’t made her future plans known, the Ford government unintentionally gave the former Premier an exit strategy last week by raising the threshold to become a recognized partyfrom 8 seats to 12.

With a lower threshold, every Liberal seat in the legislature was precious, as the party was one riding shy of regaining official status, which comes with increased parliamentary privileges and millions in caucus research and administrative funding.

A higher bar for official party status put the Liberal caucus far away from the goal posts, making even Wynne’s seventh seat almost irrelevant. :Clap-Hands: :Dancing-Chilli:

Wynne called the change “vindictive” but said the higher threshold hasn’t shifted her focus away from representing the 1.1 million Ontarians who voted for the Liberal party in June and her constituents in her riding of Don Valley West.

“I’m here,” Wynne said moments before entering the legislature to make a private member’s statement on Bill 47. The bill rolls back labour reforms previously introduced by her Liberal government.

Interim Liberal Leader John Fraser said Wynne hasn’t given him any indication of an “imminent departure” and that she has been focused on holding the current government to account as the party’s education critic.

“I see her as a member of our caucus, who’s devoted,” Fraser said, adding that he doesn’t see his predecessor’s presence as a distraction.

Wynne has become a frequent target for the Ford government, which has zeroed in a hidden deficit in the last Liberal budget of $15 billion, launched a select committee dedicated to putting the former government’s practices under the microscope and, as recently as this week, blamed Wynne for funding cuts announced in the fall economic statement.

Days after revealing that the government will not proceed with a French-language university in Toronto, Ford blamed Wynne for “lying to the people” about Ontario’s finances while promising Franco-Ontarians something the province couldn’t afford.

Wynne said she hopes Ford isn’t “motivated” by tearing down the former Liberal government’s policies, saying that she doesn’t believe it would be “good policy rationale.”

 

https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/you-re-stuck-with-me-wynne-keeps-focus-as-pcs-hike-threshold-for-party-status-1.4186129

 

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Should have expected this I guess. Once a crook always a crook!

 

Ontario Liberal insiders left office with massive, sleazy payouts!

- Andrew Bevan, Wynne's Chief of Staff had his salary jump from $313,000 in 2017 to $552,000 in 2018!

- Mary Rowe, Wynne's Executive Advisor, made $259K in 2017, but $428,000 in 2018!

- Moira Mcintyre, Wynne's Deputy Chief of Staff, made $138K in 2016, $174K in 2017, but $273K in 2018!

- Ann Byberg, Wynne's Executive Director of Marketing, made $149K in 2016 and 2017, but $223K in 2018! 

- Shelley Potter, Wynn's Deputy Chief of Staff, Planning and Administration, made $174K in 2016 and 2017, but $285K in 2018!

- William Killorn, Wynne's Executive Director, Issues Management and Legislative Affairs, $121K in 2016, $129K in 2017, but $179K in 2018!

- Gillian Mceachern, Wynne's Executive Director of Policy, $119K in 2016, made $130K in 2017, but $174K in 2018!

- Carol Price, Wynne's Executive Director of Caucus Relations, made $124K in 2017, but $180K in 2018!

- Chad Walsh, Wynne's Executive Director, External Relations and Operations, made $125K in 2017, but $167K in 2018!

THE LIST GOES ON AND ON!

Edited by Jaydee

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