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Malcolm

RCAF Pilots Safely Eject

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Air Force pilots safely eject before plane crashes near Moose Jaw, Sask.

Circumstances leading to crash not yet known

CBC News Posted: Jan 27, 2017 12:31 PM CT Last Updated: Jan 27, 2017 1:19 PM CT

The military Harvard II that crashed in the vicinity of 15 Wing at Moose Jaw. Two pilots ejected safely.

The military Harvard II that crashed in the vicinity of 15 Wing at Moose Jaw. Two pilots ejected safely. (RCAF)

 

Two pilots safely ejected from an aircraft before it crashed near a Canadian Armed Forces base near Moose Jaw, Sask.

The pilots were flying a Harvard II on Friday in the vicinity of 15 Wing Moose Jaw, the centre of Royal Canadian Air Force training.

The Department of National Defence has confirmed both pilots are alive with non-life-threatening injuries. Their names will not be released. 

The department said its director of flight safety is involved and an investigation will be launched, adding that the circumstances of the crash are not yet known.

The air force said it was in the process of notifying next of kin.

Same plane in similar crash 3 years ago

The same aircraft was involved in a crash at the same Moose Jaw base on Jan. 24, 2014.

Two pilots ejected safely before the plane crashed about 5.5 kilometres south of the airfield.

A Canadian Forces spokesperson told CBC at the time that the two pilots ejected due to an issue with the plane's landing gear. 

Plane used as stepping stone for jet training

According to the RCAF website, the Harvard II is used to help new pilots transition from basic flight training to high-performance jet training.

After logging about 95 hours in the turboprop plane, the pilots are streamed into fighter, multi-engine or helicopter programs

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Pretty Spooky.. 

I would be reluctant to take air-frame # 102 up if it has a tendency to crash now and then, (according to the 'article'.)

Poor aircraft probably feel ostracized seeing they took a photo of it all alone on the tarmac........, of course it could have an "attitude" problem and all the other aircraft don't want to be associated with it.

Gotta love the Press.embarassed.gif

 

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2 hours ago, Kip Powick said:

Pretty Spooky.. 

I would be reluctant to take air-frame # 102 up if it has a tendency to crash now and then, (according to the 'article'.)

Poor aircraft probably feel ostracized seeing they took a photo of it all alone on the tarmac........, of course it could have an "attitude" problem and all the other aircraft don't want to be associated with it.

Gotta love the Press.embarassed.gif

 

Not the first time that the pilot(s) exited stage left and the airplane survived. 

 

"The "Cornfield Bomber" was the nickname given to a Convair F-106 Delta Dart, operated by the 71st Fighter-Interceptor Squadron of the United States Air Force. It made an unpiloted landing in a farmer's field in Montana, suffering only minor damage, after the pilot had ejected from the aircraft. The aircraft, recovered and repaired, was returned to service, and is currently on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force."

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornfield_Bomber

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I guess a "belly landing" was ruled out?  (perhaps the gear was not fully up or down...) Kip: based on your service history,  do you expect the results of any investigation to ever be published or will they be under a military cloak?  

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Quote

Not the first time that the pilot(s) exited stage left and the airplane survived.

 

The RCAF had a similar incident with a CF-5 around Edmonton I believe.

Unfortunately the pilot sustained some serious head injuries from the bailout.

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17 minutes ago, Malcolm said:

I guess a "belly landing" was ruled out?  (perhaps the gear was not fully up or down...) Kip: based on your service history,  do you expect the results of any investigation to ever be published or will they be under a military cloak?  

The Military AIB seldom makes the results of a Military aircraft crash public UNLESS there has been a loss of life and even then the actual record is never published, at least not in my lifetime and I have done 3 Boards.

As you are aware there are no CVRs or FDRs on the vast majority of Military aircraft...however there probably is on the A-310 and perhaps the Globemaster, those I am not sure of.

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Many of the full Flight Safety Investigation Reports used to be available online.  However, as noted on the current site, the full reports are not currently available as a result of the web restructuring.

For example, here are a few links that contain FSIRs that used to be on the old website:

CH147202 Chinook

CH147204 Chinook

CC115465 Buffalo

CT156112 Harvard II

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14 hours ago, Kip Powick said:

The Military AIB seldom makes the results of a Military aircraft crash public UNLESS there has been a loss of life and even then the actual record is never published, at least not in my lifetime and I have done 3 Boards.

As you are aware there are no CVRs or FDRs on the vast majority of Military aircraft...however there probably is on the A-310 and perhaps the Globemaster, those I am not sure of.

Thanks, Kip and CD. 

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