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Posted (edited)

Blaming the type of gun, the colour of the stock or the age limit to buy one strikes me as overly simplistic. It would be really nice if it were that simple. We could simply invoke the concept of POOF and fix it instantly.

But consider that the guy in Texas killed his own grandmother as a warmup to the main event... it's hard to contain that level of murderous commitment with regulations. The NS shooting incident is a case in point, more regulation wouldn't have stopped him. Once intent is formed at this level of derangement, the shooters have entered a suicide pact with themselves. If all the guns magically disappeared (the POOF concept), they would turn to explosives... we're actually lucky that hasn't happened yet, it's worse than guns.

Something has changed here, and it's not firearms, it's society.  Other than refinements, handguns haven't changed much since 1911 so it's nice to see someone mention the real issue. You'll almost never hear this from politicians though:

Baltimore police commissioner blames 'total disregard for human life' for rampant violence

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8 hours ago, Kargokings said:

After falling for several years, rates of firearm-related violent crime are on the rise in Canada, the majority of which involve handguns, a recent report from Statistics Canada shows.

Released on Friday

Have read the excerpts in the media of the government study……..one stat that seems to be missing is the percentage of crimes committed with guns that were illegally possessed…ie not licensed . 
 

I DONT THINK THAT WOULD FIT THE LIBERAL NARRATIVE.

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8 hours ago, st27 said:

missing is the percentage of crimes committed with guns that were illegally possessed…ie not licensed . 

Taken a step further, I suppose you could consider a handgun that isn't stored double locked, transported double locked directly to and from the range, and used exclusively at an authorized range / competitive event to be illegally possessed regardless of license status. I hadn't previously thought of it that way...

In any case, that doesn't fit the narrative either as it begs a simple question, how many people have been murdered at authorized ranges, IPSC, Cowboy action, or 3 gun type events?

If legal gun owners are really the problem, that should stand as a valid question and the numbers should be compelling. To my knowledge, the answer is zero. Most people with strong opinions on the subject that I've talked to are shocked at the level of existing regulation and when asked, can't come up with a rule that would have prevented the murderous rampage(s) being discussed.

Correcting the deliberate statistical manipulations (in the form of misinformation) would be an exhausting job. 

 

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Posted (edited)

Here ya go... the buying and transfer (for succession) rush is already in full gear. Given NDP support for the liberals, people seem to think this (revived) effort now has legs.

BREAKING: Liberals table bill to 'freeze' the purchase, transfer or importation of handguns in Canada 

'We’ve seen too many innocent lives lost. And certainly that is true in my hometown in Toronto': Public Safety Minister Marco Mendocino

Perversely, those who were on the fence about purchases are online right now sourcing their new acquisitions; four and five at a time in some cases.

Prior to this (the AR 15 thing), JT had already sold more forearms that any other Prime Minister in our history, this will be a huge boost to his resume. 

No doubt gang members will immediately shut down those trans border drone flights and late night boat trips.

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First Reading is a daily newsletter keeping you posted on the travails of Canadian politicos, all curated by the National Post's own Tristin Hopper. Published Monday to Thursday at 6 p.m. Eastern Time (and 9 a.m. on Saturdays). Sign up your friends here. 

TOP STORY

 

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has a developed a bit of a habit of taking domestic political stances that are seemingly targeted for a U.S. audience.

 

After word leaked earlier this month that the U.S. Supreme Court was set to overturn federal guarantees on abortion, Trudeau immediately issued a statement touting how "every woman in Canada has a right to a safe and legal abortion." When Black Lives Matter protests roiled the United States last summer, Trudeau was quick to "take a knee" for photographers on the streets of Ottawa. And now, after a mass shooter killed 19 at an elementary school in Texas last week, Trudeau has responded with a slate of new restrictions on Canadian ownership.

 

Canada and the U.S. both enjoy some of the Earth's highest rates of civilian gun ownership, but the similarities basically stop there. Below, a not-at-all comprehensive rundown of the sharp differences between Canadian and U.S. gun laws.

 

Guns can’t technically be owned for self-defence in Canada

 

Easily the biggest difference between Canadian and U.S. gun owners is cultural. American firearms rights are guaranteed in the U.S. constitution for the explicit purpose of arming the citizenry as a check against tyranny. And when you ask gun owners why they possess firearms, the vast majority of them report that it’s for personal protection.

 

But in Canada, the government allows civilians to own guns only for three main reasons: Killing animals, collecting, and shooting tiny holes in paper targets for fun. 

There are obviously plenty of Canadian gun owners who will fudge this condition in an emergency, but Canada mandates a pretty strict storage regime for firearms which makes them hard to whip out at a moment’s notice.

Unless you’re in a wilderness area, your gun needs to be stored unloaded and separate from its ammunition. In addition, it either needs to be in a locked vault or, at the very least, fitted with a trigger lock. 

There is a very, very rare exception to the above wherein a Canadian citizen can be authorized by the RCMP to carry a concealed handgun for protection if they can prove that they face regular threats to their life. As of 2018, only two Canadians had this certification.

 

Nobody buys guns or ammunition in Canada without an RCMP-approved licence 

By their 21st birthday, most Americans can purchase a long gun with minimal restrictions. The U.S. has a whole latticework of rules governing handguns and concealed carry and magazine size; but as a rule, if you don’t have a criminal record, you’re all clear to pick up some pretty serious small arms. 

Even in New York State — home to some of the strictest gun laws in the U.S. — a successful background check clears you to pick up a 10-shot semi-automatic sniper rifle (the semi-automatic part meaning that it fires every time you pull the trigger without recocking). 

But in Canada, you will receive nothing but hearty laughter at the local gun shop until you can show evidence of a Possession and Acquisition Licence. To get one, you’ll have to complete the Canadian Firearms Safety Course and then submit an application to the RCMP. Among other things, it requires you to submit the contact details of current and former conjugal partners, who may get a call from the Mounties asking if it’s a good idea that you be allowed to own guns. 

In 2019, 946 Canadians had their application for a PAL rejected. “Potential risk to others” was the most popular reason, with 212 getting spiked for “mental health.” 

Fun fact: You generally don’t need a licence in Canada to buy muzzle-loading black powder rifles, as the federal government doesn’t classify them as firearms. So, the most powerful civilian firearm at the time the U.S. Constitution was drafted is now so comparatively harmless that even Canada doesn’t consider it a real gun.

 

“Red-flagging” a Canadian gun owner is way easier to do

 

The rash of civilian mass shootings that have plagued the United States in recent years have prompted many U.S. states to pass what are called “red flag laws.” The laws differ in each jurisdiction that has introduced them, but it basically allows police or family members to seek a court order to remove firearms from an individual who may pose a risk to themselves or others.

 

In Canada, it’s right in the Criminal Code that a police officer can take your guns without a warrant. All they need is a reasonable suspicion that “an offence is being committed, or has been committed.” Chief Firearms Officers similarly retain broad powers to revoke PALs, such as an accusation of domestic violence or a firearm owner getting diagnosed with a mental illness (there’s even a hotline, 1-800-731-4000, that Canadians are urged to call to report dodgy gun owners). Did you get drunk and make a cryptic comment to your ex about life not being worth living? Don’t be surprised if there’s a Mountie on your doorstep the next day looking to seize your gun collection. 

There’s also something called “continuous eligibility screening” under which any time a gun owner is “involved in an event which could affect their eligibility,” it gets plugged into the Canadian Police Information Centre, where it’s flagged for review by a CFO. There are ways to appeal getting a PAL revoked, but with no Constitutional guarantee on firearms ownership in Canada, it’s what criminal lawyers would call a “fragile privilege.”

 

You can’t legally fire a handgun anywhere except a licensed range

 

While individual U.S. states may differ on the specifics, there’s nothing immediately illegal about a U.S. citizen keeping a loaded handgun in their desk, their glove compartment or in their purse. With rare exceptions, Canadians haven’t really been able to do this since the 19th century.

 

Handguns (firearms with barrels shorter than 470 mm) are almost entirely classified as “restricted” firearms in Canada. You’re still allowed to own restricted firearms, but they come with a very onerous set of rules. Basically, the only place Ottawa wants you to have a handgun is locked up in your home, at a licensed range, or in the trunk of the car driving between those two places (and God help you if you stop for lunch enroute).

 

If you’re moving, you can’t take that handgun anywhere unless you get the RCMP to issue you an “Authorization to Transport.” Take a handgun hunting, use it for target practice in your backyard or just store it alongside its ammunition, and you risk getting your entire gun collection (even the long guns) sent to the smelter.

 

Canadian gun owners basically aren’t allowed to carry

 

Wearing a pistol on your belt is legal in all but three U.S. states. Roughly half of U.S. states will let you carry around a concealed pistol without a licence, while the others will need you to get a permit. As mentioned, Canadians can face total gun confiscation if a police officer so much as catches them with a pistol in their purse, even if it’s unloaded and unable to fire.

 

The rules are a bit different for long guns. You can keep an unloaded rifle in your car, and there’s technically nothing in the Firearms Act that would prevent you from shouldering your rifle at the grocery store, provided it’s unloaded and the action is open (it would have to be visibly “uncocked,” in other words). But aside from the occasional rural Tim Hortons during hunting season, this basically doesn’t happen, as visibly carrying a firearm around in Canada for no apparent reason is a great way to get the cops called on you.

 

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FIRST READING: A reminder (since Trudeau apparently forgot) that Canadian gun law is already way stricter than the U.S.

Tristin Hopper - 15h ago
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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says scary things about guns in Ottawa on Monday, May 30, 2022.
© Provided by National PostPrime Minister Justin Trudeau says scary things about guns in Ottawa on Monday, May 30, 2022.

First Reading is a daily newsletter keeping you posted on the travails of Canadian politicos, all curated by the National Post’s own Tristin Hopper. To get an early version sent direct to your inbox every Monday to Thursday at 6 p.m. ET (and 9 a.m. on Saturdays), sign up here.

TOP STORY

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has a developed a bit of a habit of taking domestic political stances that are seemingly targeted for a U.S. audience.

After word leaked earlier this month that the U.S. Supreme Court was set to overturn federal guarantees on abortion, Trudeau immediately issued a statement touting how “every woman in Canada has a right to a safe and legal abortion.” When Black Lives Matter protests roiled the United States last summer, Trudeau was quick to “take a knee” for photographers on the streets of Ottawa. And now, after a mass shooter killed 19 at an elementary school in Texas last week, Trudeau has responded with a slate of new restrictions on Canadian gun ownership.

Canada and the U.S. both have some of the Earth’s highest rates of civilian gun ownership, but the similarities basically stop there. Below, a not-at-all comprehensive rundown of the sharp differences between Canadian and U.S. gun laws.

GUNS CAN’T TECHNICALLY BE OWNED FOR SELF-DEFENCE IN CANADA

Easily the biggest difference between Canadian and U.S. gun owners is cultural. American firearms rights are guaranteed in the U.S. constitution for the explicit purpose of arming the citizenry as a check against tyranny. And when you ask gun owners why they possess firearms, the vast majority of them report that it’s for personal protection.

But in Canada, the government allows civilians to own guns only for three main reasons: Killing an imals, collecting, and shooting tiny holes in paper targets for fun.

The U.S. Second Amendment. Canada has no constitutionally guaranteed firearms rights, and never has.
© U.S. Library of CongressThe U.S. Second Amendment. Canada has no constitutionally guaranteed firearms rights, and never has.

There are obviously plenty of Canadian gun owners who will fudge this condition in an emergency, but Canada mandates a pretty strict storage regime for firearms which makes them hard to whip out at a moment’s notice.

Unless you’re in a wilderness area, your gun needs to be stored unloaded and separate from its ammunition. In addition, it either needs to be in a locked vault or, at the very least, fitted with a trigger lock.

There is a very, very rare exception to the above wherein a Canadian citizen can be authorized by the RCMP to carry a concealed handgun for protection if they can prove that they face regular threats to their life. As of 2018, only two Canadians had this certification.

NOBODY BUYS GUNS OR AMMUNITION IN CANADA WITHOUT AN RCMP-APPROVED LICENSE 

By their 21st birthday, most Americans can purchase a long gun with minimal restrictions. The U.S. has a whole latticework of rules governing handguns and concealed carry and magazine size; but as a rule, if you don’t have a criminal record, you’re all clear to pick up some pretty serious small arms.

Even in New York State — home to some of the strictest gun laws in the U.S. — a successful background check clears you to pick up a 10-shot semi-automatic sniper rifle (the semi-automatic part meaning that it fires every time you pull the trigger without recocking).

But in Canada, you will receive nothing but hearty laughter at the local gun shop until you can show evidence of a Possession and Acquisition License. To get one, you’ll have to complete the Canadian Firearms Safety Course and then submit an application to the RCMP. Among other things, it requires you to submit the contact details of current and former conjugal partners, who may get a call from the Mounties asking if it’s a good idea that you be allowed to own guns.

If your ex doesn’t like the idea of you owning guns, Canada may not let you.
© RCMPIf your ex doesn’t like the idea of you owning guns, Canada may not let you.

In 2019, 946 Canadians had their application for a PAL rejected. “Potential risk to others” was the most popular reason, with 212 getting spiked for “mental health.” In other words, the Texas shooter whose actions have prompted Trudeau’s latest round of gun control almost certainly would have been barred from obtaining a firearm if he’d lived in Canada. 

Fun fact: You generally don’t need a licence in Canada to buy muzzle-loading black powder rifles, as the federal government doesn’t classify them as firearms. So, the most powerful civilian firearm at the time the U.S. Constitution was drafted is now so comparatively harmless that even Canada doesn’t consider it a real gun.

The four planks of Trudeau’s newly introduced gun control measures. Plank number two and number four are already well-established in Canadian law.
© Prime Minister's OfficeThe four planks of Trudeau’s newly introduced gun control measures. Plank number two and number four are already well-established in Canadian law.

“RED-FLAGGING” A CANADIAN GUN OWNER IS WAY EASIER TO DO

The rash of civilian mass shootings that have plagued the United States in recent years have prompted many U.S. states to pass what are called “red flag laws.” The laws differ in each jurisdiction that has introduced them, but it basically allows police or family members to seek a court order to remove firearms from an individual who may pose a risk to themselves or others.

In Canada, it’s right in the Criminal Code that a police officer can take your guns without a warrant. All they need is a reasonable suspicion that “an offence is being committed, or has been committed.” Chief Firearms Officers similarly retain broad powers to revoke PALs, such as an accusation of domestic violence or a firearm owner getting diagnosed with a mental illness (there’s even a hotline, 1-800-731-4000, that Canadians are urged to call to report dodgy gun owners). Did you get drunk and make a cryptic comment to your ex about life not being worth living? Don’t be surprised if there’s a Mountie on your doorstep the next day looking to seize your gun collection.

The “cops can take your guns without a warrant” section of the Criminal Code.
© Government of CanadaThe “cops can take your guns without a warrant” section of the Criminal Code.

There’s also something called “continuous eligibility screening” under which any time a gun owner is “involved in an event which could affect their eligibility,” it gets plugged into the Canadian Police Information Centre, where it’s flagged for review by a CFO. There are ways to appeal getting a PAL revoked, but with no Constitutional guarantee on firearms ownership in Canada, it’s what criminal lawyers would call a “fragile privilege.”

Did you forget to renew it? Don’t worry; it just means that the RCMP can seize your firearms and potentially block you from ever again being a Canadian gun owner.
© HandoutDid you forget to renew it? Don’t worry; it just means that the RCMP can seize your firearms and potentially block you from ever again being a Canadian gun owner.

YOU CAN’T LEGALLY FIRE A HANDGUN ANYWHERE EXCEPT A LICENSED RANGE

While individual U.S. states may differ on the specifics, there’s nothing immediately illegal about a U.S. citizen keeping a loaded handgun in their desk, their glove compartment or in their purse. With rare exceptions, Canadians haven’t really been able to do this since the 19th century.

Handguns (firearms with barrels shorter than 470 mm) are almost entirely classified as “restricted” firearms in Canada. You’re still allowed to own restricted firearms, but they come with a very onerous set of rules. Basically, the only place Ottawa wants you to have a handgun is locked up in your home, at a licensed range, or in the trunk of the car driving between those two places (and God help you if you stop for lunch enroute).

The official RCMP guidelines on how a Canadian handgun must be stored. This is not a country that looks kindly on leaving loaded pistols in glove compartments or desk drawers.
© RCMPThe official RCMP guidelines on how a Canadian handgun must be stored. This is not a country that looks kindly on leaving loaded pistols in glove compartments or desk drawers.

If you’re moving, you can’t take that handgun anywhere unless you get the RCMP to issue you an “Authorization to Transport.” Take a handgun hunting, use it for target practice in your backyard or just store it alongside its ammunition, and you risk getting your entire gun collection (even the long guns) sent to the smelter.

CANADIAN GUN OWNERS BASICALLY AREN’T ALLOWED TO CARRY

Wearing a pistol on your belt is legal in all but three U.S. states. Roughly half of U.S. states will let you carry around a concealed pistol without a licence, while the others will need you to get a permit. As mentioned, Canadians can face total gun confiscation if a police officer so much as catches them with a pistol in their purse, even if it’s unloaded and unable to fire.

The rules are a bit different for long guns. You can keep an unloaded rifle in your car, and there’s technically nothing in the Firearms Act that would prevent you from shouldering your rifle at the grocery store, provided it’s unloaded and the action is open (it would have to be visibly “uncocked,” in other words). But aside from the occasional rural Tim Hortons during hunting season, this basically doesn’t happen, as visibly carrying a firearm around in Canada for no apparent reason is a great way to get the cops called on you.

 
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Posted (edited)

Quote of the day from JT. The extent of the lie would be humorous if it weren't for the fact so many believe it. 

In the information age, the capacity for voters to believe total absurdities has far exceeded my most cynical projections:

“I think people need to careful about misinformation and disinformation in this. We’ve explicitly and specifically not targeted law abiding firearms owners,” Trudeau said.

For contrast, and to illustrate the stratospheric level of absurdity, here's a quote from the adjacent article about a 15 year old arrested for carrying a .22 CZ. No amount of regulation imposed on the law abiding will deter criminals.

The charges against him: Possess loaded restricted firearm, possess prohibited/restricted weapon or prohibited device knowing no authority, possess prohibited or restricted firearm without holding a licence, possess prohibited or restricted firearm knowingly not holding a licence, alter serial number on firearm, carry conceal weapon, store firearm carelessly, occupy motor vehicle with firearm, transport firearm carelessly, and fail to comply with undertaking.

 

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Preaching to the converted.

GUNTER: Here's why Liberal gun ban won't reduce crime

Lorne Gunter - Yesterday 4:36 p.m.
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© Provided by Toronto SunPrime Minister Justin Trudeau is pictured in Kitchener, Ont., April 20, 2022.

The Liberals’ slow-motion confiscation of all handguns in the country – which is what Monday’s announcement of a freeze on handgun sales is really all about – will do nothing to reduce violent crime in Canada.

How could it?

For instance, each year in Canada there are fewer than 800 murders. Of those, well under 300 are committed with firearms and about two-thirds of those involve handguns.

 
 

“Aha!” You say, “so those clever Liberals are onto something.”

If over the next 30 to 40 years (that’s how long it will take, using Bill C-21 to get rid of the 1.1 million handguns in Canada) we eliminate legal handguns, we might, theoretically, be able to reduce homicides by, say, 200 a year.

Except for one inconvenient little fact: Most handguns used in violent crime in Canada are not legal. Upwards of 90 per cent are smuggled in from the States. Some come from South America. The largest chunk enter through First Nations that straddle the Canada-U.S. border.

Since illegal handguns won’t be stopped by Monday’s freeze, no more than 20 murders a year will be prevented by seizing all the legally owned handguns in the country. And very likely fewer than that.

The feds don’t keep solid stats on legal handguns used in killings, but the last year they hazarded a guess the number was five.

Who can assure me those five murders wouldn’t have been committed with a rifle or shotgun or knife, if a handgun hadn’t been available?

Law-abiding handgun owners (who are the only Canadians covered by Monday’s freeze) rarely commit crimes. Indeed, Gary Mauser, a professor emeritus at Simon Fraser University, has shown that legal handgun owners are so thoroughly screened criminally and psychologically before being granted a handgun permit they are only half as likely to commit crimes as the general population.

We have one-quarter as many guns per capita as the Americans, but only about one-sixth or fewer firearms deaths each year (murders and suicides). We’re just not a killing nation.

Monday’s freeze, which will make it illegal to buy, sell, trade, give away or import handguns, also requires that as current owners die, their pistols and revolvers be turned over to the government for destruction. Moreover, the government has not promised to pay compensation for this seizure of private property.

Remember after the mass shooting in Nova Scotia in 2020, this same government announced a ban on “assault-style” weapons, too. Initially, these high-powered rifles could be kept until the current owner died, just like handguns.

Then the Liberals changed their minds and said all the assault rifles had to handed in by this April. Then they extended that deadline to October 2023. Then Monday they promised the hand-in would take place by the end of this year.

No one knows what the Liberals are doing (other than issuing grandiose promises to make themselves look tough on crime), because they don’t know what they’re doing.

But, “Aha!” you say again. “At least, in this latest round of gun controls, the Trudeauvians are increasing the maximum sentence for gun smuggling and for selling illegal guns from 10 to 14 years.”

However, at the same time the Liberal government is getting rid of the mandatory minimum sentence of five years for “using a firearm in commission of a crime, possessing a restricted or prohibited weapon without a licence, possessing a loaded handgun, possessing a weapon obtained through crime, weapons trafficking or using a gun to commit robbery or extortion.”

Almost no one is sentenced to maximum penalties, but thousands of gun criminals will spend less time in prison as a result of the Liberals doing away with mandatory minimums.

Still think the Liberals’ measures will reduce crime?

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Remember the liberal talking point about the bad “assault style weapon designed to kill the most amount of people in the least amount of time”? They have banned them so the problem will disappear. Leave it to the criminal mind to come up with a solution that every self respecting gang banger can’t do without….

And if Canada can’t control the illegal smuggling of hand guns, this option will be impossible to stop….handgun freeze or no handgun freeze.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Handgun sales have been going stratospheric since Tuesday morning and most outlets are now sold out of popular items. Some even closed their doors to walk in customers today in order to service the number of online purchasers.

I’ve been trying since Tuesday morning to effect a direct transfer to a family member all to no avail. They either aren’t taking calls or the lines are jammed. After about 30 mins on hold, they claim system failure and hangup. It’s possible they’re busy processing all of the new sales, but I don’t know that. If not, it’s pretty underhanded... we’ll find out which it is (was) in about 18 months.

Anyway, I wouldn’t be surprised if this massive 3 day handgun sale didn’t set a record for volume. A similar thing happened in 2020 with the pending AR 15 prohibition, sales skyrocketed.

With this debacle on his resume, I dare say JT has single handedly sold more firearms in a shorter period of time than any other Canadian politician ever has, it’s likely a historic event. As if that wasn’t enough though, he’s created a new category of single issue voters… I’m a reluctant member of that club now.

There’s a downside for liberals here as well, if they still expect me to care about items dear to their heart like, affordable daycare, housing, etc etc, they’re in for a surprise. It no longer factors into my voting decision and I no longer have to keep up on the issues before voting… I only have one issue now, I only have one question and I only need to hear one answer.

Although life suddenly became simpler for me, I admit that my new voter status isn’t good for democracy… but neither is making voters desperately afraid of an election result that doesn’t go their way.

There’s something sinister about the 70/30% split I often refer to. It’s a predictable tipping point and it always results in the loss of rights and property for the minority. 70 percenters carry enough political and voting weight to shape outcomes but 30% is still statistically significant assuming they are demographically concentrated enough to wield what power their numbers provide. It’s how splits, separations and sanctuary jurisdictions evolve into being.

Regardless of which side of the split people fall on though, they should be concerned about the longterm implications of maintaining and strengthening the split, it can become firmly entrenched pretty quickly. In particular, they should watch for and shun any party, of any stripe, who seeks to leverage that split for short term political expediency.

Now that I’m a self admitted single issue voter, I won’t actually be following my own advice though. Does that make me a Liberal again?

 

   

Edited by Wolfhunter
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49 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

Handgun sales have been going stratospheric since Tuesday morning and most outlets are now sold out of popular items. Some even closed their doors to walk in customers today in order to service the number of online purchasers.

I’ve been trying since Tuesday morning to effect a direct transfer to a family member (secession rights to a single item) all to no avail. They either aren’t taking calls or the lines are jammed. After about 30 mins on hold, they claim system failure and hangup. It’s possible they’re busy processing all of the new sales, but I don’t know that. If not, it’s pretty underhanded... we’ll find out which it is (was) in about 18 months.

Anyway, I wouldn’t be surprised if this massive 3 day handgun sale didn’t set a record for volume. A similar thing happened in 2020 with the pending AR 15 prohibition, sales skyrocketed.

With this debacle on his resume, I dare say JT has single handedly sold more firearms in a shorter period of time than any other Canadian politician ever has, it’s likely a historic event. As if that wasn’t enough though, he’s created a new category of single issue voters… I’m a reluctant member of that club now.

There’s a downside for liberals here as well, if they still expect me to care about items dear to their heart like, affordable daycare, housing, etc etc, they’re in for a surprise. It no longer factors into my voting decision and I no longer have to keep up on the issues before voting… I only have one issue now, I only have one question and I only need to hear one answer.

Although life suddenly became simpler for me, I admit that my new voter status isn’t good for democracy… but neither is making voters desperately afraid of an election result that doesn’t go their way.

There’s something sinister about the 70/30% split I often refer to. It’s a predictable tipping point and it always results in the loss of rights and property for the minority. 70 percenters carry enough political and voting weight to shape outcomes but 30% is still statistically significant assuming they are demographically concentrated enough to wield what power their numbers provide. It’s how splits, separations and sanctuary jurisdictions evolve into being.

Regardless of which side of the split people fall on though, they should be concerned about the longterm implications of maintaining and strengthening the split, it can become firmly entrenched pretty quickly. In particular, they should watch for and shun any party, of any stripe, who seeks to leverage that split for short term political expediency.

Now that I’m a self admitted single issue voter, I won’t actually be following my own advice though. Does that make me a Liberal again?

 

   

You are talking about the us?????? or story link? The reason I ask is that is amazing then that so many have been approved to have a handgun but only now take the leap.

Handguns are flying off the shelves in a local gun store - Richmond News (richmond-news.com)

Quote

 

The RCMP requires a minimum of 45 days to process a firearms licence application. There is a minimum 28-day waiting period for all applicants who do not presently hold a valid firearms licence. Once this waiting period is complete, the licence should be issued without undue delay.Jun 5, 2020

Quote

How to Buy a Handgun in Canada: Regulatory and Procedural Steps

 

25 Jul 2018

  
 
 

TheGunBlog.ca — Shooting is one of the most-popular and safest sporting activities in Canada.

It’s a lot more popular and safe than playing hockey, football, skiing, and many other sports.

Everyone is banned from buying, selling or having any firearm without a licence authorized by the RCMP.

This article outlines the procedural and regulatory steps to get a licence and buy a handgun.

In Short

  1. Take the firearm-safety courses and pass tests. (3 days)
  2. Apply for licence and wait for approvals. (2-3 months)
  3. Buy handgun and wait for approvals. (A few days to a few weeks)

Before the Criminalization Order in Council of 01 May 2020: Same steps to get an AR-15 target rifle.

Newest Update of This Page: 30 May 2022


Handgun Prohibitions

  • If you don’t already have a handgun licence, you’re probably too late.
  • The federal Liberal Party, in government since 2015, is working to eliminate handgun ownership.

Intro

Respect Our Culture and Values

  • Shooting is rewarding, beneficial and fun, and it isn’t for everyone.
  • Beyond the strict legal requirements, Canada’s shooting community values our culture of safety, responsibility and good citizenship. We strive to be of good character and sound judgment.
  • If you don’t share our values or our aims, we don’t want you in our community. If you do, we’d love for you to join us.

Your Own Handgun in a Few Months

  • You’ll have many steps to follow to get a handgun, or any firearm.
  • If you can show you are responsible and trustworthy, and if you follow all the steps, you could be shooting your own pistol or revolver in less than four months. (A lot longer with Covid-19 shutdowns.)
  • The first step is to sign up for the Canadian Firearms Safety Course near you.

Facts and Stats

  • More than 2.2 million men and women have a federal firearm licence.
  • More than 600,000 of us took the extra steps to get a handgun licence.
  • Millions more of our family, friends and colleagues enjoy shooting without a permit, under our direct control.
  • In addition, 90,000 people (mainly police) are authorized or required to carry loaded handguns for work every day for personal and public safety.

 

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44 minutes ago, Kargokings said:

The reason I ask is that is amazing then that so many have been approved to have a handgun but only now take the leap.

 

There are many people who have been previously approved but now see the writing on the wall and want to expand their collection.

Someone who might own a single semi-auto sees that they might be prevented from owning something in a different caliber or from owning a revolver and they are motivated to get what they are missing.

It appears at this point that the "freeze" will happen some time in the fall - whatever you own on that date will be grandfathered - meaning you can continue ownership until you die.  This is causing a mad scramble for people to collect everything they think they might want to own for the rest of their lives!  A .22 caliber semi and a .22 caliber revolver and a 9mm semi and a 9mm revolver and a .357 revolver and a .40 caliber semi and a Tokarev and a 5.7 semi.  The list goes on and on.  If the door is closing in the fall a vast number of people will try, and are trying, to get what they want before it happens.

 

 

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On 6/2/2022 at 8:02 PM, Seeker said:

The list goes on and on.

Let’s not forget the iconic 1911. An essential in any collection imo.

Sales are so brisk, it will indeed set a record. Stores are not only selling out, but the distributors are running very low on stock!

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Seeker said:

This is causing a mad scramble for people to collect everything they think they might want to own for the rest of their lives! 

Even if an implementation date is tentatively (or even firmly) established now, given the stakes, I doubt people are willing to risk a swiftly implemented OIC thwarting their plans.

I've long toyed with the idea of CAS competition but never acted on it. Now I'm forced to join the thundering herd or forever lose the opportunity.  

As an aside, I wonder if the government anticipated the epic scramble they set off here. I'm also wondering if the volume of sales will give JT pause for reflection and serve as motivation for immediate action. With every passing hour, the potential cost of any buyback option they may be plotting for the next election is growing by leaps and bounds. The current volume of sales looks pretty bad on him and it would be hard to deflect responsibility for causing it.

I'd also guess (and hope) that overturning this will become an election issue next time around. If it is overturned, he will have accomplished the exact opposite of what his base expected, demanded or hoped for... by the looks of things, that will be by orders of magnitude.

If this trend continues, and if they wait until fall, and if the media holds them to the old lie that 50% of crime guns are domestically sourced, the liberal base that's now chortling with joy may have a few questions about the great Canadian gun sale of '22. Luckily for JT, both his base and the media knew that was a lie even as they were telling it (over and over again).

Ironically, when it comes to things like prohibitions, buybacks and other regulatory actions (the AR-15 comes to mind), the government obviously trusts Canadian owners to be responsible and abide by existing laws or they would never do things that way in the first place. To me it stands as proof that liberals know exactly what the problem is and who is causing it.

 

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Posted (edited)

Unintended consequences at work big time.

The very fact that CBC is covering this at all suggests to (a great many) people that an OIC is pending soon. Those who weren't in a panicked buying frenzy before now are... 

Take a few minutes and explain the background here to a 10 year old using an analogous product that they are saving their allowance for. It will leave you asking the WDYTWGTH questions that liberals seem incapable of grasping.

When you see those two sisters changing into sweats, t-shirts and tying their hair into pony tails, it's good time to stop digging the hole.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/handgun-sales-surge-1.6475635

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Fwiw …. Was listening to a podcast and the handgun “freeze” is being implemented differently than the “assault style weapon” ban, which was done under an OIC. From what I understand, this was an abuse or not the intent of an OIC prompting several court challenges. To avoid this again, the libs are using an “amendment to legislation” that has to go through parliament in 30 days. There are only 20 or so days left in the current sitting, so whenever parliament resumes in the fall, tack on another 10 and it’s law. I can’t see Jagmeet and his lapdogs opposing it so, it’s likely a done deal.

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31 minutes ago, st27 said:

Fwiw …. Was listening to a podcast and the handgun “freeze” is being implemented differently than the “assault style weapon” ban, which was done under an OIC. From what I understand, this was an abuse or not the intent of an OIC prompting several court challenges. To avoid this again, the libs are using an “amendment to legislation” that has to go through parliament in 30 days. There are only 20 or so days left in the current sitting, so whenever parliament resumes in the fall, tack on another 10 and it’s law. I can’t see Jagmeet and his lapdogs opposing it so, it’s likely a done deal.

The big question is will it stand and what's next?

Some enthusiast forums I've read suggest what's happening is that people are reacting to the short game and missing the long game.  Of course the ultimate Liberal plan is to eliminate/confiscate almost all firearms but some people are thinking this year it's freeze (to stop sales and transfers), next year it's change classification to prohibited (to stop transportation and use), and the year after confiscation.  

The required anger and motivation to fight the freeze will never crystalize because by the time it rolls in later in the Fall everyone will have acquired all they can afford and all they can find.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, st27 said:

I agree with that assessment, Seeker.

X2 but with great reluctance and disappointment, both in the government and fellow citizens who consistently fail to defend the rights of others when the loss of rights (actually privileges in this case) don't effect them personally. 

Seeker's assessment is largely why I've become a one issue voter now. It pains me to say that the NRA was absolutely right, give a little in good faith, loose a lot in bad. There's a lesson here I guess, despite a myriad of accusations, I'm clearly not cynical enough... by a long shot.

Yielding a single inch to narrative is a huge mistake, something 70 percenters will discover for themselves in due course. As a single issue guy though, when it finally gets to them, I'll simply leave them to their own devices and smugly parrot (as they did to colleagues that got fired) that decisions have consequences.

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Posted (edited)

Much, much more to come IMO.

Most people I know have simply been unable to source what they were looking for and all are planning multiple purchases. JT should be getting a sales commission here, he certainly deserves one. I suspect this absurdity will become the largest gun sale event in Canadian history... assuming stocks can be resupplied.

While I get the notion that people will have acquired what they want by the fall (meaning anger will subside), I also perceive that the level of anger this has generated might have legs simply because it's born from feelings of betrayal. If divorce lawyers are to be believed, betrayal that results in significant loss is highly motivating.   

Although anecdotal at best, it appears to me that I'm not the only single issue voter now. It only took two days to convert me, that's something of a record too and I can't think of any other politician in my lifetime who could have accomplished it. 

Federal gun control bill triggers run of 'panic' buying on pistols, Calgary firearms shops say 

'We have sold out of pretty much every handgun we have in two days,' says one employee

Edited by Wolfhunter
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