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Sad State of affairs in the US, not the shortage but the fevered desire / need to stockup

Ammunition shelves bare as U.S. gun sales continue to soar

By MARTHA BELLISLEtoday

SEATTLE (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic, coupled with record sales of firearms, has fueled a shortage of ammunition in the United States that’s impacting law enforcement agencies, people seeking personal protection, recreational shooters and hunters -- and could deny new gun owners the practice they need to handle their weapons safely.

Manufacturers say they’re producing as much ammunition as they can, but many gun store shelves are empty and prices keep rising. Ammunition imports are way up, but at least one U.S. manufacturer is exporting ammo. All while the pandemic, social unrest and a rise in violent crime have prompted millions to buy guns for protection or to take up shooting for sport.

“We have had a number of firearms instructors cancel their registration to our courses because their agency was short on ammo or they were unable to find ammo to purchase,” said Jason Wuestenberg, executive director of the National Law Enforcement Firearms Instructors Association.

Doug Tangen, firearms instructor at the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission, the police academy for the state, said the academy also has had trouble obtaining ammo.

“A few months ago, we were at a point where our shelves were nearly empty of 9mm ammunition,” he said. In response, instructors took conservation steps like reducing the number of shots fired per drill, which got them through several months until fresh supplies arrived, Tangen said.

Officer Larry Hadfield, a spokesman for the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, said his department also has been affected by the shortage. “We have made efforts to conserve ammunition when possible,” he said.

The National Shooting Sports Foundation, an industry trade group, says more than 50 million people participate in shooting sports in the U.S. and estimates that 20 million guns were sold last year, with 8 million of those sales made by first-time buyers.

“When you talk about all these people buying guns, it really has an impact on people buying ammunition,” spokesman Mark Oliva said. ”If you look at 8.4 million gun buyers and they all want to buy one box with 50 rounds, that’s going to be 420 million rounds.”

The FBI’s National Instant Criminal Background Check System database also documented an increase in sales: In 2010, there were 14.4 million background checks for gun purchases. That jumped to almost 39.7 million in 2020 and to 22.2 million just through June 2021 alone.

The actual number of guns sold could be much higher since multiple firearms can be linked to a single background check. No data is available for ammunition because sales are not regulated and no license is required to sell it.

As the pandemic raced across the country in early 2020, the resulting lockdown orders and cutbacks on police response sowed safety fears, creating an “overwhelming demand” for both guns and ammo, Oliva said. Factories continued to produce ammunition, but sales far exceeded the amount that could be shipped, he said.

“Where there is an increased sense of instability, fear and insecurity, more people will purchase guns,” said Ari Freilich of the Gifford Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence.

As supplies dwindled, Feilich said, some gun owners began stockpiling ammo.

“Early on in the pandemic, we saw people hoarding toilet paper, disinfectant, and now it’s ammo,” he said.

Wustenberg emphasized the danger in first-time gun buyers not being able to practice using their new weapons.

Going to the gun range entails more than trying to hit a target, he said. It’s where shooters learn fundamental skills like always pointing their guns in a safe direction and keeping their fingers off the trigger until they’re ready to fire.

“It’s that old adage: Just because you buy a guitar doesn’t mean you’re a guitar player,” Wustenberg said. “Some have the misconception of ‘I shot this target 5 yards away and did just fine so I’m OK if someone breaks into my house.’ You’ve got to go out and practice with it.”

The U.S. military is not affected by the shortage because the Army produces ammunition for all branches of the military at six sites across the country, according to Justine Barati, spokesperson for the U.S. Army Joint Munitions Command.

The U.S. shooting team, which won four medals at the Tokyo Olympics, also had the ammo needed to train thanks to a commitment from sponsors, but membership and junior programs have struggled, said Matt Suggs, chief executive officer for USA Shooting.

The U.S. Biathlon team, training for the 2022 Winter Olympics in February, also has been supplied with ammo from its sponsor, Lapua, made in Finland. But local clubs face shortages, said Max Cobb, president of U.S. Biathlon Association.

Jason Vanderbrink, a vice president at Vista Outdoor, which owns the Federal, CCI, Speer and Remington ammunition brands, said the companies are shipping ammo as fast as they can make it.

“I’m tired of reading the misinformation on the internet right now about us not trying to service the demand that we’re experiencing,” he said in a YouTube video produced for customers aimed at quashing speculation suggesting otherwise.

Imports of ammunition from Russia, South Korea, the European Union and others were up 225% over the past two years, according to an analysis by Panjiva Inc., which independently tracks global trade. But at least some U.S.-made ammo is heading out of the country.

Winchester has logged 107 shipments since January 2020, according to Panjiva. Most went to Australia to fulfill a contract Winchester secured with NIOA, the country’s largest small-arms supplier. Nigel Everingham, NIOA’s chief operating officer, said he could not disclose how much ammo Winchester is supplying.

A few shipments also went to Belgium and Israel.

Meanwhile, most of the ammunition pictured on the website for Champion’s Choice, a gun store in LaVergne, Tennessee, is listed as “out of stock.”

“We keep ammo on order but we’re not sure when it’s going to come available, “sales manager Kyle Hudgens said. “It does put us in a bad position with our customers. They’re asking what the deal is.”

And Bryan Lookabaugh at Renton Fish & Game’s skeet and trap range in Renton, Washington -- where shooters try to hit discs flying at 35 to 70 mph -- said the limited availability means fewer people show up for shooting practice and some couldn’t participate in a recent competition.

“We have not had a full shipment in a year,” he said.

Duane Hendrix, the range master at the Seattle Police Athletic Association, a police and civilian gun range in Tukwila, Washington, said he now limits ammo sales to two boxes per customer.

“I’ve never seen anything like it before,” Hendrix said. “There’s stuff we can’t get, especially rifle ammo. If you don’t have ammo for your customers, there’s no point in having your doors ope

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Welcome to Toronto !!

Two men dead, two wounded in Chinatown shootout

“It’s a brazen shooting. It’s a daytime shooting,” said Const. Alex Li, who added that “some type of altercation took place outside, by that intersection. Gunfire was exchanged.

 

Police said the four victims of the 6 a.m. shooting at Spadina Ave. and Nassau St. were men ranging in age from 28 to 43. The two wounded were rushed to a hospital.

Spadina was closed between Dundas and College Sts. for several hours Sunday.

The bodies of the two dead men lay on Spadina behind a privacy screen and an ambulance for hours as the investigation progressed.

Police added officers discovered shell casings on the street and sidewalk after the incident that has people living nearby fearful.

“I used to work nights. I can’t work anymore nights. It’s too dangerous sometimes,” said Amir Chaudhary, shaking his head as he opened his restaurant across the street from the shooting scene on Sunday.

https://torontosun.com/news/two-dead-2-critically-injured-in-kensington-market-shooting?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR0-GuynDj_PUJLezKUpscwtxlxbxB3OpSsm6aovUl-25rUr6GzCK5gSpmg#Echobox=1628441713

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4 hours ago, Kargokings said:

This is a huge problem.  I'm a gun owner.  Sometimes, when the subject comes up, I'll ask about the person's understanding of the current laws.  Surprise!  Most know almost nothing and what little they do know comes from US media. 

"We should have background checks."  We do.  And they are incredibly thorough. 

'We should ban automatic weapons."  These have not been legal in Canada for 40 years.  

"We should make it illegal to carry handguns."  Yup, already illegal.

'You should have to have a license to buy a gun."  You do have to have a license to buy a gun.

"We should make criminals and those with mental health issues ineligible from buying guns." We do.

Don't even get me started on the whole nonsense of "assault rifles."  What a load of cr@p.

 

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17 hours ago, Seeker said:

This is a huge problem.  I'm a gun owner.  Sometimes, when the subject comes up, I'll ask about the person's understanding of the current laws.  Surprise!  Most know almost nothing and what little they do know comes from US media. 

"We should have background checks."  We do.  And they are incredibly thorough. 

'We should ban automatic weapons."  These have not been legal in Canada for 40 years.  

"We should make it illegal to carry handguns."  Yup, already illegal.

'You should have to have a license to buy a gun."  You do have to have a license to buy a gun.

"We should make criminals and those with mental health issues ineligible from buying guns." We do.

Don't even get me started on the whole nonsense of "assault rifles."  What a load of cr@p.

 

Good Morning Seeker:

Well said  +1

I am very old school bolt action 303 or lever action 30-30 with iron sights as if you need a semi-auto with a scope you shouldn't be in the bush? 

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9 hours ago, A330PilotCanada said:

I am very old school bolt action 303 or lever action 30-30 with iron sights as if you need a semi-auto with a scope you shouldn't be in the bush? 

I don't think that's the right way of looking at it.  Do still drive an old car with a standard transmission or do you have a newer car with an automatic?  Technology moves forward.  True, you can successfully hunt with WW1 surplus Enfield but if you're going to make that argument why not just use a black powder musket?  The new semi-auto rifles are finely tuned and very accurate and hold 4 rounds.  I would guess most hunts still only take 1 shot.  You might be surprised to hear but a lot of these are used for target shooting - therefore the semi-auto aspect is a significant benefit.

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1 hour ago, Seeker said:

I don't think that's the right way of looking at it.  Do still drive an old car with a standard transmission or do you have a newer car with an automatic?  Technology moves forward.  True, you can successfully hunt with WW1 surplus Enfield but if you're going to make that argument why not just use a black powder musket?  The new semi-auto rifles are finely tuned and very accurate and hold 4 rounds.  I would guess most hunts still only take 1 shot.  You might be surprised to hear but a lot of these are used for target shooting - therefore the semi-auto aspect is a significant benefit.

Good Evening Seeker:

Why use 4 rounds when it only takes one.

I have forgot some ballistic tables but a .303 is a through and through whereas the newer .223 ammunition although supersonic on hitting starts a shock wave that turns internal organs to mush and will "tumble" because of its mass on entry with the other three in trail will turn your target into "ground chuck" on the hoof.

Yes I know of a couple of people who use muskets just because they can

You are absolutely right one shot will do it so why multiples of as a single shot requires more skill?     

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14 hours ago, A330PilotCanada said:

Good Evening Seeker:

Why use 4 rounds when it only takes one.

I have forgot some ballistic tables but a .303 is a through and through whereas the newer .223 ammunition although supersonic on hitting starts a shock wave that turns internal organs to mush and will "tumble" because of its mass on entry with the other three in trail will turn your target into "ground chuck" on the hoof.

Yes I know of a couple of people who use muskets just because they can

You are absolutely right one shot will do it so why multiples of as a single shot requires more skill?     

1).  First of all, don't know why you're talking about .223 as it's not legal for hunting anywhere in Canada (maybe small game like rabbits) so that's hardly the comparison.

2).  The Enfield .303 has an accuracy of somewhere between 2 and 6 MOA.  That means a skilled person can hit (approx) a 2 inch to 6 inch circle at 100 yards.  Sounds alright because the desired target area on a deer is bigger than 6 inches but there are several assumptions; perfect conditions, a rested and proficient shooter, etc.  Take a cold, and tired hunter who's been sitting in a tree-stand for 4 hours or tramping through the bush since 5:00 AM and he might get 10 or 12 MOA.  Add in a bit of wind and the MOA can jump to 14 or 16.  If the distance is 200 yards the MOA doubles.  So, the theoretical ability of the mighty Enfield to be able to make 4 inch circles at 100 yards can very easily become a hunting rifle that might put the bullet in a 2 foot circle in the field - that's a miss or a wounded animal.  Neither desirable.

Almost any modern rifle can shoot 1 MOA.  Some advertise as being "Sub 1 MOA" which means they can virtually always put the shots in a circle less than 1 inch in diameter at 100 yards.

So, if you, being the marksman you claim to be, want to hunt with a 100 year old rifle and you feel that you can compensate for the inherent problems with doing so - great.  What's your advice for someone just getting into hunting - buy an old Enfield or get a new rifle?  One way will result in some failed hunts with wasted time and money and the occasional wounded animal that runs away to die in a ditch even with your best effort at shooting and tracking while the other gives you the best possible chance to take the animal humanely and the ability to take a follow-up shot if needed.

I often hear old-timers say what you said; "I only need one shot", "I don't need a scope", "I use an old bolt .303."  Somehow the story about the time they took a shot and missed at 100 yards never gets told.  The story about the time they saw a deer at 200 yards and didn't take the shot because they weren't confident never gets told.  The story about the time they had to track a wounded animal for hours because they clipped it never gets told.  Reminds me of people who will brag about their trip to the casino and how much they won - never hear about the 4 other trips where they lost money.  My father used to walk 3 miles to school.  Uphill both ways.  I checked;  less than a mile, flat ground (both ways).

3).  Your idea that a bullet that goes "through and through" is superior or desirable is archaic.  The number 1 goal is to hit the target in the target area.  The number 2 goal is that all the energy of the bullet is transferred to the target.  If the bullet exits the target (through and through) it represents a failure of the shooter - wrong ammo choice or wrong rifle.  You seem to misunderstand - you want a shockwave with fatal internal damage to the organs.  The idea is to kill the deer immediately, not for it to run away with a little .303" hole in it.

 

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Only Mexico you say?

Mexico's suit against US gunmakers edges ahead

AFP  2 hrs ago

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The US federal court examining Mexico's lawsuit against top US arms manufacturers has set deadlines for the case's first proceedings, foreign ministry officials said Sunday.

© GUILLERMO ARIAS Seized weapons are seen at a Mexican military base in the border city of Tijuana before being destroyed

Last week, the Massachusetts court approved the calendar proposed by the relevant parties.

"The defendant companies will have until November 22, 2021 to present their response to the Mexican lawsuit and oppose the legal defenses they deem pertinent," the ministry statement said. 

After that, the Mexican government will have until January 31, 2022 to respond and the defendant companies will have to present their response before February 28, 2022. 

The process is expected to conclude in the first half of next year. 

In early August, the Mexican government sued nine US gun manufacturers and two distributors -- including Smith & Wesson, Beretta, Colt, Glock, Century Arms, Ruger and Barrett -- for what it deemed a "negligent and illicit" trade that encourages drug trafficking and violence in its territory. 

The Mexican government maintains that between 70-90 percent of the weapons recovered at crime scenes in Mexico have been trafficked from the United States. 

The lawsuit, unprecedented in the countries' bilateral relationship, was accepted by the US justice about two weeks after it was filed.   

The litigation seeks compensation for the damage caused by the firms' alleged "negligent practices," as well as the implementation of adequate standards to "monitor and discipline" arms dealers.

Mexico, with a population of 126 million people, has been plagued by widespread deadly violence since December 2006, when the government of then-president Felipe Calderon launched a controversial military anti-drug operation. 

Since then, according to government figures, more than 300,000 people have been murdered in Mexico, the majority by firearms and in events related to drug trafficking. 

Mexico tightly controls weapons sales; they are practically impossible to access legally.

wk/mdl/caw

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Is this a great country or what??  So we have an immigrant charged in the murder of a plain clothes police officer in Toronto….released on bail ….but we don’t know why because of a publication ban ……and now this….

Quote

You often hear of someone accused of a heinous crime being out on bail at the time. In this case, it was the victim who was out on bail, released while awaiting trial in the 2018 beating and stabbing death of a 21-year-old.

Shot dead Wednesday was 26-year-old Guryodh Singh Khattra.

He is the very same Khattra who, along with four others, was charged with first-degree murder in the vicious slaying of Paviter Singh Bassi. 
He was gunned down just before 5 p.m. Wednesday in a wild shooting that also wounded his mother at their Brampton home. 

And another out on bail is charged with murder:

Quote

He also asked the Toronto Sun and the public to “not forget” about the murder of 25-year-old Darian Henderson-Bellman, whose alleged killer was released on bail during the pandemic despite being before the courts on serious gun charges and an assault on the young woman.

https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/warmington-brampton-shooting-victim-was-on-bail-awaiting-trial-for-murder

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Well this is a new twist for Toronto’s communities of diversity…..definitely not the holder of an RPAL…

 

 

Girl, 15, charged with first-degree murder of teenaged Toronto boy 

Caden Francis, 16, was shot on July 3

 

https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/girl-15-charged-with-first-degree-murder-of-teenaged-toronto-boy

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PM blowing smoke on gun crime

 

  • Calgary Sun
  • 7 Nov 2021
  •  

During the federal election campaign, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to give $1 billion to provinces and territories that want to “ban” handguns.

But that won't lower gun violence given that, to cite just one example, almost

80% of the guns used to commit crimes in Toronto are illegal handguns originating in the United States.

Since criminals aren't deterred by the Criminal Code, it's a given they won't be deterred by provincial legislation or municipal bylaws.

The Trudeau government knows this. Its 2018 paper by Public Safety Canada, Reducing Violent Crime: A Dialogue on Handguns and Assault Weapons, reported that:

“The vast majority of owners of handguns and of other firearms in Canada lawfully abide by requirements, and most gun crimes are not committed with legallyowned firearms …

“Any ban of handguns or assault weapons would primarily affect legal firearms owners …

“Jurisdictions differ in their approaches to controlling handguns and assault weapons … the data does not conclusively demonstrate that these handgun or assault weapons bans have led to reductions in gun violence … patterns of gun violence are influenced by many factors and the impact cannot be attributed to one factor.”

Bill Blair, former Toronto police chief, now Trudeau's emergency preparedness minister, told the Globe and Mail in 2019 banning handguns wouldn't work because most illegal guns are smuggled into Canada from the U.S.

“I believe that would be potentially a very expensive proposition but just as importantly, it would not … be perhaps the most effective measure in restricting the access that criminals would have to such weapons because we'd still have a problem with them being smuggled across the border.”

Now the Trudeau government is poised to reintroduce legislation that died on the order paper when the PM called the election in August to remove mandatory minimum sentences for many gun-related offences.

This includes using a firearm or imitation firearm in the commission of an offence; knowingly possessing an unauthorized firearm; possession of a prohibited or restricted firearm with ammunition; possession of a weapon obtained by commission of an offence; extortion with a firearm; discharging a firearm with intent; discharging a firearm — recklessness; robbery with a firearm; and extortion with a firearm.

That will, no doubt, make criminals who use guns happy.

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You do have to wonder how many guns make it through.  Adds more doubt to the Liberal move to ban this type of arms from Law Abiding Canadians.

An American Women Tried To Enter Canada With 56 Guns In The Trunk Of Her Car

Canada Edition (EN)  1 hour agoimage.thumb.png.10f61299cb6d3c6df8e8367ea988aca2.png

An American woman was caught trying to enter Canada from the U.S. at a land border in Ontario with 56 guns stashed in the trunk of her car and she was arrested then charged.

%7B© Provided by Narcity

Canada Border Services Agency announced this seizure on November 19 and said it's one of the largest single firearm seizures in southern Ontario in recent history. On November 1, 2021, a vehicle was pulled in for a secondary examination at the Blue Water Bridge border crossing near Sarnia. During the examination, CBSA officers found 56 undeclared prohibited firearms,13 over-capacity magazines, 43 ten-round pistol magazines and 100 rounds of ammunition in boxes in the trunk. Vivian Richards, a 48-year-old from Oakland Park, Florida, was arrested and charged by the CBSA with: 

Making false or deceptive statements

  • Evading compliance
  • Keeping, acquiring, disposing of goods illegally imported
  • Attempting to smuggle
  • Unauthorized possession of a firearm
  • Unauthorized possession of a prohibited weapon or restricted weapon
  • Possession for the purpose of weapons trafficking
  • Importing or exporting knowing it is unauthorized
  • Possessing a firearm knowing that the serial number on it has been altered, defaced or removed

All of the items were seized and an investigation is ongoing.

image.png

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StatCan reports 743 homicides in 2020; highest since 1991

Michael LeeCTVNews.ca Writer

@mtaylorlee Contact

Published Thursday, November 25, 2021 1:54PM ESTLast Updated Thursday, November 25, 2021 1:54PM EST
OPP Carleton Place

Ontario Provincial Police carry out a homicide investigation at the 7 West Motel in Carleton Place, Ont., on July 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

 

NORTH BAY -- Police in Canada reported more than 740 homicides in 2020 — the most in three decades — in a year that also saw the country experience its worst mass murder in history.

A total of 743 homicides were reported last year, the highest number since 1991 and an increase of 56 homicides compared to 2019.

The figures, detailed in a new report released Thursday by Statistics Canada, used data pulled from the 2020 Homicide Survey, which collects police-reported information on homicide incidents, victims and accused persons in Canada.

The country's homicide rate edged up seven per cent to 1.95 per 100,000 people, making it the highest national homicide rate in Canada since 2005.

"The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound impacts on Canadian society since March 2020," the StatCan report said. "These marked societal and economic changes have contributed to a shift in crime patterns across Canada."

Homicides remain relatively rare in Canada, StatCan noted, making up less than 0.2 per cent of all violent crime in 2020.

Although the country's homicide rate has steadily increased since 2014, it remains lower than some of the highs recorded in the early 1990s and mid-1970s.

However, last year's increase comes as the country saw an eight per cent decrease to its Crime Severity Index, which measures the volume and severity of police-reported crime in Canada.

COVID-19 PANDEMIC

StatCan noted that many victim service providers and advocates have expressed concerns about the impact of pandemic-related lockdown restrictions and stay-at-home orders, with social isolation, reduced income and job losses potentially leading to escalations of violence in the home.

While the number of spousal homicides fell by nine in 2020, StatCan reports that 11 more of the homicides reported were committed by family members and seven more by intimate partners.

Of the 474 solved homicides in Canada where a relationship between the accused and victim was reported, 82 per cent were by someone the victim knew personally.

Thirty-eight per cent of these homicides were committed by an acquaintance, 10 per cent by a spouse, 20 per cent by another family member, five per cent by someone the victim either had a current or former non-spousal intimate relationship with, and eight per cent by someone the victim had a criminal relationship with.

Only 18 per cent of the homicides were committed by a stranger.

 

PROVINCIAL LOOK

The rise in homicides is largely attributed to increases in Alberta and Nova Scotia.

Alberta saw 39 more homicides in 2020, while Nova Scotia saw an increase of 29, according to StatCan.

This includes the 22 victims of the April 2020 mass shooting that began in Portapique, N.S., and extended overnight to other areas of the province before the gunman was shot and killed by RCMP.

Calgary and Edmonton experienced the largest increases in homicides in Alberta last year, with each city reporting 15 more victims.

Toronto, being the largest city in Canada, had the highest number of homicides in the country at 105, although this was 25 fewer than 2019, making it the largest year-over-year decline among census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

Homicides, overall, rose in 20 of Canada’s 36 CMAs, according to StatCan.

Ontario and Manitoba had the largest declines in homicides with 19 and 10 fewer victims, respectively.

FIREARMS AND GANGS

About one in three homicides in Canada last year involved a firearm, of which nearly half were committed with a handgun.

In 2020, police reported a total of 277 firearm-related homicides, up six per cent compared to 2019 and the second year in a row that the rate has risen in Canada.

Handguns have been used in the majority of firearm-related homicides dating back to the early 1990s, outpacing rifles and shotguns, although their share of all firearm-related homicides has steadily decreased from 2013 when it stood at 67 per cent.

With the exception of Alberta and Nova Scotia, most provinces saw the number of firearm-related homicides decrease, with no change reported in the territories.

However, the rate of firearm-related homicides in Canada last year tied 2017 as the highest on record in more than two decades at 0.73 per 100,000 people. Regina (1.89) and Saskatoon (1.76) reported the highest rates of firearm-related homicides, according to StatCan.

Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo (0.17), Halifax (0.22), and Montreal (0.27) had the lowest rates, excluding CMAs, with zero firearm related homicides.

Despite the increase in firearm-related homicides, gang-related homicide saw its largest year-over-year decrease since 2013, falling by nine per cent in 2020 to 148 victims.

The largest declines were in Ontario, Quebec, and Manitoba, with each reporting eight, six, and six fewer gang-related homicides, respectively.

Toronto had 11 fewer gang-related homicides, Montreal 12 fewer and Winnipeg four fewer, according to the data.

StatCan reported that shootings were by far the most common method used in gang-related homicides at more than 78 per cent.

INDIGENOUS, VISIBLE MINORITY VICTIMS OVERREPRESENTED

Despite representing about five per cent of the Canadian population, the homicide rate for Indigenous victims was seven times higher compared to non-Indigenous people at a rate of 10.05 per 100,000 population, compared to 1.41.

Indigenous Peoples represented 28 per cent of all homicide victims (201) in Canada last year, according to the data.

Of these homicides, 163 were men, which StatCan noted is an increase of 24 per cent and the highest since 2014 when Indigenous identity first became available through the Homicide Survey. There were nine fewer victims of homicide involving Indigenous women, the first decrease in four years.

However, homicide rates for Indigenous men and women were much higher compared to non-Indigenous men and women at nearly eight and 5.5 times greater, respectively.

"A history of colonization, including residential schools, work camps and forced relocation, profoundly impacted Indigenous communities and families," according to StatCan’s report.

"Indigenous Peoples often experience social and institutional marginalization, discrimination, and various forms of trauma and violence, including intergenerational trauma and gender-based violence. As a result, many Indigenous Peoples experience challenging social and economic circumstances. These factors play a significant role in the overrepresentation of Indigenous Peoples in the criminal justice system and as victims of crime."

A total of 179 homicide victims in 2020 were designated as visible minorities, half of whom were identified as Black. Eighty-nine per cent were men and nearly half of these homicides were reported in Ontario, largely in Toronto.

Despite 51 per cent of people in Toronto identifying as visible minorities, they remain overrepresented in homicides accounting for more than two-thirds of victims, according to StatCan. 

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