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Malcolm

Shootings and Knifings

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Interesting stats; thanks Malcolm.

I still wouldn't want to be a resident of Toronto, but the numbers do make you wonder if the whole damn Country isn't becoming a giant thug filled cesspool?

trudeau's visionary leadership sure isn't serving the interests of Canada,  but I'll bet Soros is quite pleased with the downward spiral the Country is in.

 

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The other elephant in the room is that 99.5% of the shooters/victims come from a specific ethnicity and are generally involved in crime/turf wars. 

I think everybody in the GTAA is aware of this.

 

GetFileAttachment.jpeg.7b0cfb1710ca0375d4442c50daa68695.jpeg

This graph has no accuracy towards YYZ statistics but illustrates the point.

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19 hours ago, DEFCON said:

Interesting stats; thanks Malcolm.

I still wouldn't want to be a resident of Toronto, but the numbers do make you wonder if the whole damn Country isn't becoming a giant thug filled cesspool?

trudeau's visionary leadership sure isn't serving the interests of Canada,  but I'll bet Soros is quite pleased with the downward spiral the Country is in.

 

if you dont live here please dont coment on what its like to live here.  It is a great city.  Like EVERY city it has some issues but it is a great ciy

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It's not that hard to figure out and not that hard to fix.... it just takes lots of money. When will liberals be willing to pay for liberal values? Not doing this right is my personal definition of racism. 

There are only two questions here, are you willing to pay for it? And if not, what did you think was going to happen? 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/gang-violence-1.4975700

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boestar.

Call the place great if you like, but that's kind of a subjective perspective don't you think?

Although Toronto was never completely free of violent crime most of its problems used to center around parking, rent control, traffic overload and public transportation.

People could generally go on with their lives without having to be on guard and aware of everything going on around them at all times and believe it, or not, residents of the burbs could actually leave their windows open, doors unlocked and as short sighted as it may have been, they could even leave their vehicle running while they ran into a convenience store and expect it to be there when they returned.

At one time the police investigated small stuff like bicycle thefts, but nowadays they aren't generally inclined to investigate most property related crimes and direct the public instead to contact a telephone reporting center where a record of the event is created for insurance and statistical data keeping purposes.

Like a lot of large and small communities anymore, Toronto's police force is overwhelmed by serious criminal activity and don't have the resources to deal with the ever increasing volume of petty crime, which leads to declining public order and increasingly more crime ... check out the 'Broken Window Theory'.

https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1CCLEAL_enCA787CA787&ei=psw8XL2ZM8LdjwSkqqeQDA&q=broken+window+theory&oq=broken+window+theory&gs_l=psy-ab.1.0.0l10.147497.156835..159175...0.0..0.129.4225.47j3......0....1..gws-wiz.....0..0i71j0i67j0i131.c34dQNaZXJY

  

As large North American cities went, Toronto 'was' definitely one of the greatest and safest places to live, work and visit.

 

 

Edited by DEFCON

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3 hours ago, DEFCON said:

boestar.

Call the place great if you like, but that's kind of a subjective perspective don't you think?

Although Toronto was never completely free of violent crime most of its problems used to center around parking, rent control, traffic overload and public transportation.

People could generally go on with their lives without having to be on guard and aware of everything going on around them at all times and believe it, or not, residents of the burbs could actually leave their windows open, doors unlocked and as short sighted as it may have been, they could even leave their vehicle running while they ran into a convenience store and expect it to be there when they returned.

At one time the police investigated small stuff like bicycle thefts, but nowadays they aren't generally inclined to investigate most property related crimes and direct the public instead to contact a telephone reporting center where a record of the event is created for insurance and statistical data keeping purposes.

Like a lot of large and small communities anymore, Toronto's police force is overwhelmed by serious criminal activity and don't have the resources to deal with the ever increasing volume of petty crime, which leads to declining public order and increasingly more crime ... check out the 'Broken Window Theory'.

https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1CCLEAL_enCA787CA787&ei=psw8XL2ZM8LdjwSkqqeQDA&q=broken+window+theory&oq=broken+window+theory&gs_l=psy-ab.1.0.0l10.147497.156835..159175...0.0..0.129.4225.47j3......0....1..gws-wiz.....0..0i71j0i67j0i131.c34dQNaZXJY

  

As large North American cities went, Toronto 'was' definitely one of the greatest and safest places to live, work and visit.

 

 

Still is.  There is far more good here than bad.  wouldnt have it any other way.

It may be subjective but if you are not familiar with the subject then refrain from commenting.

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1 hour ago, boestar said:

...if you are not familiar with the subject then refrain from commenting.

That would likely shut down 80% of the discussion on this side of the forum.

I briefly lived in Toronto but it proved far to much “city” for me and I left a great aviation job behind as a result… all a matter of personal choice and I have no regrets; it simply wasn’t for me.

I’m sorry to see what’s happening there and I think it will become more and more of what most people want less and less of over time. Be assured though, I’m rooting for you and hope it all works out. In the interim, I avoid Toronto as much as possible… but that’s just me.

Edited by Wolfhunter

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2 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

avoid Toronto as much as possible… but that’s just me.

Ditto...only if it’s absolutely necessary will I go near that ZOO....even driving through Toronto across the 401 takes all my patience some days

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18 hours ago, boestar said:

Still is.  There is far more good here than bad.  wouldnt have it any other way.

It may be subjective but if you are not familiar with the subject then refrain from commenting.

Somewhat off topic ? Toronto made the list of the 10 Canadian cities with the worst winters.  https://www.slice.ca/travel/photos/canadian-cities-with-worst-winters/#!Toronto-Ontario-Canadian-Cities-with-the-Worst-Winters

 

worst.jpg.16c8fce73b2b781ff8391d335ea656cc.jpg

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I'm familiar with the topic boestar; restraining discussion for the sake of protecting your sensibilities just ain't on.

Edited by DEFCON

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I have lived in the GTA for 50 years.  I am used to the idiosyncrasies of the area. Having spent time is pretty much every other major city in this country, my preference remains Toronto. 

I am outside of the city proper but do work at LBPIA so I do have to commute but I have a system that works so I don't get caught up too bad.  

I can leave my house unlocked without much of a worry.  I don't see much, if any, violent crime in my area which is nice.

You can hate it from afar but I will remain here thanks.

 

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Just a small point, but any concern I may have expressed with regard to the declining health of the City shouldn't be characterized as hateful.

And I don't 'hate from afar, but I can certainly sense the changing pulse of a City I'm familiar enough with to be taking notice.

I can't say I understand your taking offence?  

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no offence taken at all.  Its just that people crap on Toronto all time but dont spend enough time here to appreciate what it has

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There are lots of great things to be discovered and found in Toronto; the ROM and the PMH for instance.

 

 

 

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We were downtown before Christmas, walking around the Distillery district and then out for dinner...had a great time. Everybody was very friendly and it felt good to be downtown. I always enjoy my layovers as well.

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I'm guessing, but I'm willing to bet money that there wasn't an RPAL, PTC, registration or 10 round mag in sight. I will also lay odds that the weapon in question didn't have a trigger lock and wasn't in a locked container. Any takers?

https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/man-wanted-in-beaches-shooting-arrested-for-attempted-murder

Tell me again how it is that my hobby is the problem here.

Edited by Wolfhunter

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Other key points in the arrest of this guy....on probation and arrested for an unrelated crime....where did “we” go wrong?.

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1 hour ago, deicer said:

Not a terrorist incident, why?

 

We have covered this ground numerous times in the past. Terrorism is strictly defined by motive, as are other facets of law. The FBI, RCMP, Homeland Security and UN (among others) all have their own definitions but they are (generally) variations on the theme. 

Creating terror, isn't terrorism by definition. Should there be a political or religious motive discovered after the fact it could then be deemed such. 

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This almost seems like an April Fools thing or a hoax of some sort... I can't even think of an aviation equivalent (pilot misconduct) that would match.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/st-louis-police-officer-charged-after-deadly-game-with-revolver-killing-another-officer

It seems every day, that without looking for it, I stumble across instances of police misconduct that qualify as extreme in nature. It appears that three sworn officers were present at the time.... I feel sorry for their colleagues as it inevitably reflects poorly on those who don't deserve it. 

 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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I'm anxious to see how this turns out. Every time it happens, I pray its not an RPAL holder with a registered weapon... we would never ever hear the end of "there, see, I told you so." As long as it's ethnic gang bangers with illegal weapons (carried with impunity), they get a pass and nothing happens.... and nothing changes.... and the beat goes on. No one wants to see an end to this more than hobby / target / IPSC / PPC shooters. For the time being, archery isn't under scrutiny and I hope these guys don't latch on to cross bows.

 https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/warmington-gunfire-erupts-at-vaughan-banquet-hall-killing-two

And this.... from a blog (I think):

The Liberals continue to float their trial balloons about forcing Canadians to store all their civilian firearms in central repositories. This is arguably the stupidest idea to come our way since … well, who can even say?
 

Let’s look at some government agencies to see how well they do with lost and stolen firearms.

First, there is the issue of firearms left unattended in police vehicles. If Halifax’s March 2015 theft, Grand Prairie’s October 2015 theft or Winnipeg’s October 2015 theft are examples, that practice should end immediately.

In all three cases RCMP firearms were stolen from unattended vehicles.

In the Winnipeg case that stolen police firearm was used to shoot a 16-year-old girl. Winnipeg Police charged Matthew Wilfred McKay with two counts of attempted murder, and both he and Matthew Andrew Miles, 25, also face a host of other weapons-related charges including theft of the firearm. Both men were already under a prohibition order.

The firearm used to commit this tragic crime was stolen from an RCMP cruiser parked outside an officer’s home in southwest Winnipeg. While the Winnipeg Police readily admit storing firearms in unattended vehicles is prohibited, the RCMP is not so forthcoming. Claiming “ongoing investigation”, they refused to specify whether that is also the case for the RCMP.  

Dennis Young’s Access to Information Request (ATI) dated September 14, 2011 shows this is not an isolated incident. The ATI response revealed that 32 firearms were “lost or stolen” from the RCMP and that 316 firearms were “lost or stolen” from other police services across Canada.

While the numbers and types of firearms stolen from CN Police, Surete du Quebec, Royal Newfoundland Constabulary and the OPP were blacked out, the total of 316 minus the numbers stolen from municipal and aboriginal police show 30 firearms were “lost or stolen” from these Police agencies.

Another 80 firearms were “lost or stolen” from other unnamed public service agencies.  

The military will not say how many firearms are lost and stolen from their arsenals.  

Some politicians have expressed that the only people who should possess firearms are the police and military. Since our police forces can’t keep their guns from being “lost or stolen” how on earth can these people believe civilian firearms stored in “central storage sites” will be safe?  

Presumably, civilian firearms would be stored at gun clubs. Who will pay for the construction of secure storage facilities at gun clubs across the nation? Who will guard these storage facilities? And what will happen when a criminal gang decides it wants all the guns inside one of these storage facilities?

Let's do the math. Average size pistol club? 500 members. Average number of restricted/prohibited firearms per member? Five guns. That's 2500 restricted/prohibited firearms all in one place at the same time being guarded by the club's caretaker or a $15/hour security guard.

Many shooting ranges are in remote rural locations and police response time to an alarm are measured in half-hours, not minutes. Besides, the bad guys will have 2500 guns. Our coppers are brave but not stupid, and they will be highly unlikely to rush into that situation. So when some criminals decide they want the guns from inside one of these storage facilities, what is stopping them?

The criminals will get away unscathed. Long gone by the time police arrive and this is surely no fault of our men and women in uniform. They will now have to deal with these firearms in the hands of criminals. It’s just one of many unintended consequences of a really lousy idea.

Our firearms are currently protected by anonymity and proximity. It works pretty well and really needs to be left alone. Let's hope sanity prevails, not the reality-challenged idiots that came up with this basket full of stupid.

 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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On ‎1‎/‎26‎/‎2019 at 4:18 AM, Wolfhunter said:

This almost seems like an April Fools thing or a hoax of some sort... I can't even think of an aviation equivalent (pilot misconduct) that would match.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/st-louis-police-officer-charged-after-deadly-game-with-revolver-killing-another-officer

It seems every day, that without looking for it, I stumble across instances of police misconduct that qualify as extreme in nature. It appears that three sworn officers were present at the time.... I feel sorry for their colleagues as it inevitably reflects poorly on those who don't deserve it. 

 

I also feel sorry for their colleagues but I guess looking at the number of occurrences vs the number of Police in the US, they still behave better than the rest of the population.

 in the United States
There are over 18,000 Federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies around the United States, and it is estimated that there are between 750,000 and 850,000 sworn officers. If you count non-sworn personnel who work for police departments, you get over 1 million.

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9 minutes ago, Malcolm said:

they still behave better than the rest of the population.

 

As do registered (restricted)  gun owners in Canada. Statistically, they are the most law abiding citizens in the country and that is an undeniable fact and it's verified on a daily basis in order to maintain the privileges earned. Suggesting otherwise, as the Liberal government has (and does) is so far off the mark that they have had to manufacture statistics.... and gotten caught doing so.

Edited by Wolfhunter
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