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1 hour ago, Malcolm said:

deicer
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deicer
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Good Morning Defcon

I did not take down the 'Trump Wins' thread.

Those with powers greater than mine have deleted and changed things of their own accord.

Looking at the 87 pages all that seems to have happened is that the thread was renamed. So should I consider your remark about deletion to be "Fake news" ?

 

 

 

Hi Malcolm

Yes, the thread was renamed, and posts were deleted.  Not by me though.  So, no, not fake news.

 

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I didn't see the correction regarding the woman who complained her hijab was torn off. Allegedly....she lied. Trump was elected by virtue of the votes of those he persuaded with his campaign pron

This is all I will say on the subject. Let's be honest, they didn't exactly have an easy choice. Liar vs. Liar is a pretty accurate way to frame it. They made their choice but were deeply divided in d

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5 minutes ago, deicer said:

Hi Malcolm

Yes, the thread was renamed, and posts were deleted.  Not by me though.  So, no, not fake news.

 

Posts were deleted? I must have missed that. As far as being renamed, it is my understanding that  can be done of the author of the original post or by Admin.  I see you started this topic so perhaps you can change the title back or ? Cheers

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Well, as the author, and having not changed it, I will leave it as it is to highlight the 'fake news manipulation'.

As for the deleted posts, that is also up to those who posted 'fake news' and wished to have it removed.

It is what it is, I have posted nothing I wish to hide from.

 

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If you are referring to me Deicer, at least have the guts to name me.  I suppose I could easily delete your posts, but why would I? As admin sometimes its necessary when against rules... but not in this thread by me. But like any member, you are able to delete your own posts or edit them. That's my right too and when I delete my own post, it has NOTHING to do with fake news!

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Speaking of how things got started with collusion, here's a theory...

"We escaped the circle of filth's depraved plan despite their most ardent efforts. The odds were stacked incredibly high against us. The hand of Providence must have decreed that the end of evil is well nigh upon us. More will be revealed soon. "

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/987791747869822977.html

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7 hours ago, deicer said:

Well, as the author, and having not changed it, I will leave it as it is to highlight the 'fake news manipulation'.

As for the deleted posts, that is also up to those who posted 'fake news' and wished to have it removed.

It is what it is, I have posted nothing I wish to hide from.

 

In actual fact deicer, I changed the title based on what I thought was a good suggestion by a member but I did not remove any posts. 

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14 hours ago, deicer said:

 

Those with powers greater than mine have deleted and changed things of their own accord.

 

Again Deicer, you are implying that your posts are being deleted in this thread.  Are your posts being deleted or not?  Or is this just another deflection attempt(known snowflake tactic when loosing the debate) to steer the readers to think your being bullied on the thread. Simple question.

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No deflection.

It was implicated that I was making changes, and I am just confirming that I didn't.  So who else had the authority/power to do so?

If you are feeling challenged or guilty or conspiratorial, once again, I have nothing to do with that.

So, let's get back to the discussion of Trump being a doofus, or do you want a bun fight?

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Yup, tax cuts work...

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/30/business/the-tax-cut-buybacks-business-investment.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=first-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

Data on the gross domestic product, released Friday, showed that business investment grew at a 6.1 percent annual clip during the first three months of 2018, down from 7.2 percent during the first quarter last year.

Boeing said it had bought back $3 billion worth of its stock in the first quarter. (It expects to buy $15 billion over the next two years.) Facebook expanded its plans to buy back its shares to the tune of $9 billion. the appliance maker Whirlpool said it would sell its Brazilian refrigerator compressor business for roughly $1 billion, and then use that money to buy its own shares. The railroad operator CSX said it had bought back more than $800 million in shares in the first quarter, as part of plans to buy $5 billion in shares by the first quarter of next year.

As they anticipated a windfall from tax cuts, the nation’s banks increased their pace of buybacks by more than 50 percent last year, to $77.5 billion from $51 billion in 2016, according to data compiled by S&P Global Market Intelligence. The 10 largest banks, led by JP Morgan Chase and Citigroup, accounted for 70 percent of those buybacks.

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Analysis

Trump winning the Nobel Peace Prize? Why experts give him credit for North Korea talks

Yes, experts say. U.S. President Donald Trump — who once sympathized with violent white nationalists, implored a crowd at a campaign rally to "knock the hell out of" protesters, and threatened nuclear annihilation against North Korea — is a contender for a Nobel Peace Prize.

U.S. president cited for enforcing sanctions that have led to the bargaining table

 
photo-matt-kwong-author-bio.jpg?imwidth=
Matt Kwong · CBC · Posted: May 01, 2018 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 3 hours ago

Sung-Yoon Lee snickered at the suggestion, dismissing it as "absurd" and "premature" at first. Then the scholar on the Koreas at Tufts University reconsidered the prospect.

Actually yes, Lee conceded. He thinks U.S. President Donald Trump — who once defended violent white nationalists, implored a crowd at a campaign rally to "knock the crap" out of protesters, and threatened nuclear annihilation against North Korea — is a probable contender for a Nobel Peace Prize.

He might even win.

"I think odds are he will," said Lee, the Kim Koo-Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies. "But for all the wrong reasons."

If the upcoming historic U.S.-North Korea summit proves to be successful, at least in terms of optics, possibly resulting in, say, the release of a handful of Americans detained in North Korea and the halt of further major weapons tests this year, Lee said, "then I really wouldn't rule it out."

Trump's base would certainly love to see it happen. On a weekend campaign rally in Michigan, he paused mid-speech, smiling as supporters broke into chants of "Nobel! Nobel!"

South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who held a hopeful inter-Korean summit with North Korean ruler Kim Jong-un, also seems in favour ahead of Trump's expected meeting with Kim in May or June at an undetermined location.

"President Trump should win the Nobel Peace Prize," Moon told his staff, according to the Blue House.

The South Korean leader deflected praise from himself, commending Trump's "maximum pressure" policy of aggressive rhetoric and enforcement of harsh sanctions, for bringing Kim to the negotiating table.

"I give President Trump huge credit for bringing about the inter-Korean talks," Moon said. "And I'd like to thank him for that."

The South Korean president's Nobel suggestion came on Monday, after the widow of his predecessor praised him for working with Kim toward "complete denuclearization" of the Korean Peninsula.

From the sounds of it, an unexpected peace process is now within grasp. But that's just the thing, Lee warns. 

"It's simply verbal palliative from the North Korean leader," he said. "Kim Jong-un has a new disposition, a sunnier face, but there's nothing substantial accomplished yet."

Stephen Noerper, senior director for policy at the Korea Society, said the previous three U.S. administrations and this one have had largely similar bipartisan policies on North Korea.

While Barack Obama's administration may have been the era of "strategic patience," he said, Trump has described his approach as one of "peace through strength."

"I wouldn't rob the current administration of their being more activist," Noerper said. "But the difference, really, is the circumstances."

What can't be discounted is how much of a bargaining chip Kim now has, owing the hermit kingdom's demonstrated ability to launch a nuclear missile to strike the U.S. mainland.

Noerper noted Kim is a younger, more dynamic leader who appears eager to "strike a bolder path" than his late father and predecessor by pursuing economic sustainability, not just military power, for the survivability of his regime.

Under Kim's signature two-plank "byunjin" policy, the pursuit of nukes and economic modernization is likely viewed as "two wheels on the cart," Noerper said. While he doesn't expect Kim would trade one for the promise of the other, Kim does appear to have prioritized economic growth for now, with the promise to suspend ballistics tests.

It's not the most obvious of peace workers. I would assumed that if he was indeed nominated, he doesn't really have any capital as a man who has engaged in working on the cause of peace.—  Torbjorn   Knutsen , expert on the Nobel Institute

So far, Kim has promised to shutter its main nuclear test site at Punggye-ri and cease testing ballistic missiles. He also pledged to invite outside observers to help dismantle the facility.

All good signs that Harry Kazianis, director of defence studies with the conservative Center for the National Interest, attributes to Trump.

"We're not going to have a nuclear war any time soon, so that's as good a reason as any to give Trump the Nobel."

Kazianis points to two key factors. There's the maximum-pressure campaign on North Korea, which he said "by October" should drain their foreign currency reserves, "meaning they're broke." And there's pressure on China and Russia to enforce harsh sanctions, the easing of which would allow Kim to pursue his goal of economic modernization.

At the same time, Kazianis believes the inter-Korean dialogue amounts to little more than a "Potemkin summit" — big on theatrics but thin on substance.

Despite its feel-good emphasis on relationship-building, the first inter-Korean summit in more than a decade has a lot of questions around denuclearization. That puts the ball in Trump's court, with his sit-down with Kim expected within weeks. (Associated Press)

Ultimately, the Trump administration wants the irreversible termination of the North's nuclear program. It won't be easy to get there.

"The challenge is we have to remember what North Korea has given up to build those nuclear weapons. Hundreds of thousands of North Koreans have died so Kim could build those nuclear weapons," Kazianis said.

$100 billion price tag?

"Think about all the food and resources denied to this population to build them. The price tag is going to be astronomically high, not just some small promise of economic aid."

An opening bid might be at least $100 billion in economic aid, the removal of sanctions and a security guarantee from the Chinese to ensure there is no invasion of North Korea.

Who deserves credit for the peace talks is already a complicated matter for Torbjorn Knutsen, an expert on the Nobel Institute at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

"I am sure somebody will nominate Trump," he said from Trondheim, Norway. "I don't know what to say. It's not the most obvious of peace workers. I would assumed that if he was indeed nominated, he doesn't really have any capital as a man who has engaged in working on the cause of peace."

Another possibility, Knutsen said, is that the leaders of the two Koreas might share a Peace Prize — leaving Trump out of it.

Knutsen was reminded of the 1993 handshake and signing of the Oslo Accords between Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat and Israeli prime minister Yitzhak Rabin, seen as a reconciliation that was facilitated by U.S. president Bill Clinton. In the end, it was Arafat, Rabin and Israeli foreign minister Shimon Peres who split the prize in 1994, with Clinton moved to the sidelines.

Honouring a brutal autocrat

Lee, the Koreas expert at Tufts University, can see that bearing out in this case, even if it means the Nobel Committee honouring a brutal autocrat.

"As absurd as it is, I think Kim deserves it more than anyone else," Lee said. "Without his compliance, there is no meeting; there is no summit."

That could make it difficult for many to overcome some cognitive dissonance. Still, few would have also predicted months ago that Kim and Trump would meet soon to resolve the nuclear crisis.

How serious the North Koreans are about negotiating is an open question, however. During his charm offensive in South Korea, Kim even made light of his frequent missile tests to Moon, referencing the early-morning hours of the launches.

"I will make sure not to interrupt your sleep anymore," Kim said, according to reports
 

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Let's use the follow the money criteria.

Why does the U.S. want to get into North Korea?

Could it be that after U.S. corporations burned out the cheap labour in India, then China, Vietnam and the rest of Asia, North Korea is the last refuge of underemployed, underpaid labour?  

What better place to build a new plant than somewhere that's salivating over foreign investment and can supply the cheapest labour?

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43 minutes ago, deicer said:

Let's use the follow the money criteria.

Why does the U.S. want to get into North Korea?

Could it be that after U.S. corporations burned out the cheap labour in India, then China, Vietnam and the rest of Asia, North Korea is the last refuge of underemployed, underpaid labour?  

What better place to build a new plant than somewhere that's salivating over foreign investment and can supply the cheapest labour?

Yet another conspiracy theory....   OMG..........  Those big, bad US corporations........  

However to rain on your parade:

Here are 15 countries with the cheapest labor in the world. 

MADAGASCAR - $490 PER YEAR

GHANA - $488 PER YEAR

TAJIKISTAN - $487 PER YEAR

THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO - $472 PER YEAR

LIBERIA - $435 PER YEAR

MALAWI - $412 PER YEAR

GUINEA-BISSAU - $372 PER YEAR

VENEZUELA - $361 PER YEAR

THE GAMBIA - $317 PER YEAR

TANZANIA - $240 PER YEAR

BANGLADESH – $228 PER YEAR

KYRGYZSTAN - $181 PER YEAR

CUBA - $108 PER YEAR

GEORGIA - $96 PER YEAR

UGANDA - $22 PER YEAR

Data Source: https://www.therichest.com/world-money/15-countries-with-the-cheapest-labor/

and some more detail re the top (lowest 10) from another source.


https://www.dailymanagementreview.com/Ten-countries-with-the-cheapest-labor-force_a2925.html

10. Malawi - $ 412 annually 

Just like many developing countries, Malawi's economy is dependent on donor assistance, in particular the IMF and other countries that commit funding for the country. In terms of investments, Malawi is one of the safest destinations in Africa. In addition, the labor force there is very cheap - $ 0.17 per hour, that is, just $ 412 annually. This wage is considered low even for Malawi’s residents. 

9. Guinea-Bissau - $ 372 annually 

Guinea-Bissau has one of the lowest GDP per capita, and most of local citizens live below the poverty line. Agriculture is the leading sector of the economy. Fishing and growing nuts are the most popular occupations here. Due to the fact that two-thirds of the population lives in poverty, wages are also low - $ 0.17 per hour, that is, $ 30 and a bag of rice in a month. 

8. Venezuela - $ 361 annually 

Venezuela is one of the most urbanized countries in the region. Most of the country’s population lives in urban areas, such as Caracas. Venezuela possesses huge reserves of oil, yet this fact does not help the country cope with its economic problems. At the moment, Venezuela suffers from skyrocketing inflation, and most of the people live in poverty despite the abundant oil reserves. The minimum wage here is only $ 0.17 per hour, which is $ 361 per year. 

7. Gambia - $ 317 annually 

Almost a third of Gambia's population lives below the poverty line. The country's economy depends on agriculture, tourism and the fishing sector. These industries employ the largest number of people. The minimum wage here is only $ 0.13 per hour, which is $ 317 per year. 

6. Tanzania - $ 240 annually 

Tanzania is known as a destination for wildlife lovers. Since Tanzania used to be a British colony, majority of local population speaks in English. Tanzania is a developing country, so local infrastructure is not of high quality. Therefore, conditions for doing business there are not ideal. Cost of living in the country is very low, and a large proportion of the population lives in poverty. The minimum wage there - $ 0.1 per hour (just $ 20 monthly). 

5. Bangladesh - $ 228 annually 

Bangladesh is known for its cyclones and natural disasters. Most of the population is engaged in farming. At the same time, cost of living there is among the lowest in the region. Cheap labor makes the country good for business. Minimum wage there is $ 0.09 an hour, and minimum payment per month - $ 19, but this is not true for all sectors. For example, an employee in the textile industry is paid $ 68 per month. 

4. Kyrgyzstan - $ 181 annually 

The country's population is about 6 million people. It’s not easy to do business there because of language barrier, weather conditions and terrain. However, the country is a great place for businessmen in other respects, including in terms of wages. The minimum wage is $ 0.09 an hour. Managers receive $ 14.  

3. Cuba - $ 108 annually 

Cuba is a beautiful island country with an amazing climate and stunning nature. It welcomes crowds of tourists who enjoy special atmosphere of the island. Recently, Cuban and US relations warmed, but it can also mean that US companies would want to transfer their business to Cuba as minimum wage in the country is very low - $ 0.05 per hour, which makes $ 9 per month.  

2. Georgia - $ 96 annually 

Doing business in Georgia can be quite lucrative, as minimum wage is extremely low there. Minimum wage in the private sector - $ 8 per month, which is only $ 0.05 for hour. Sources also say that some locals are willing to work for $ 0.24 an hour, which would be very beneficial for those who wants to save on labor force. 

1. Uganda - $ 22 annually 

Uganda is a developing country with a population of 37.8 million people. Since Uganda was a British colony, the official language there is English. Salaries there starts from $ 0.01 per hour, which is $ 1.7 per month and $ 22 per year. This is a very low level of wages, especially when compared to the minimum wage in other countries. Nevertheless, the cost of living in Uganda is also very low. 

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So no one is wondering why the corporation and banks are buying back stock in record numbers?  There is a storm coming.

 

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22 minutes ago, boestar said:

So no one is wondering why the corporation and banks are buying back stock in record numbers?  There is a storm coming.

 

I would have thought if a storm was coming, they would be selling stock (while the price was high)  to build up their cash reserves.

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2 hours ago, DEFCON said:

You're not just a Leftie Deicer, you're a full blown Marxist.

 

I think you need to rethink your insults.  

This isn't about communism, this is the last throws of American Imperialism.  The empire is dying and Trump is only accelerating the fall.

http://www.dictionarycentral.com/definition/imperialism.html

Economics

noun the act of controlling other countries as if they were part of an empire. Although imperialism is used to refer to states which have or had colonies (such as Britain, France, Belgium and the Netherlands) it is now widely used to refer to states which exert strong influence over other states. This influence can be political, military or commercial.

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12 hours ago, deicer said:

Let's use the follow the money criteria.

Why does the U.S. want to get into North Korea?

Could it be that after U.S. corporations burned out the cheap labour in India, then China, Vietnam and the rest of Asia, North Korea is the last refuge of underemployed, underpaid labour?  

What better place to build a new plant than somewhere that's salivating over foreign investment and can supply the cheapest labour?

JUst read the rest of your post above. AhhhhAhhhh mm  I believe you may be ignorant on global slave labour.  #justsayin'

How did DEFCON insult you?

 

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And before anyone posts CNN's fake news version on today's happenings...

"It has EVERYTHING to do with the discovery of manipulated evidence by corrupt FBI agents, the use of said evidence to intimidate Mr Flynn into a plea deal & the approval of said deal, by a dodgy Judge."

The plot can't get any thicker 

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/991455298828230656.html

 

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Look at the bigger picture people.  Don't watch the hands.  The real stuff is going on behind the curtain.  Trump is a distraction.

 

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Once again it is a case of follow the money.  The Ukrainians are pressured to halt their investigation into Manafort because they want to get American made weapons.  Following the money trail, they too were getting too close to the truth.  They also allowed a person of interest to return to Russia to avoid him having to testify.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/02/world/europe/ukraine-mueller-manafort-missiles.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=first-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

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