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Trump 2.0 Continues

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4 hours ago, deicer said:

You can't dismiss it as such. 

As a PS, I took a look at the map in question and laughed. That circle looked liked something I might have drawn except being ex-army, I would have used a crayon. So, I’m thinking it was a Naval Officer, they use sharpies because it makes them feel….sharp.

Then, I would have asked the met briefer what he thought the maximum wind speed and sea state would be in the area. Then I might have asked the Coast Guard rep about oil rigs in the area and any vulnerable coastal infrastructure. The environmental guy would talk briefly about installation capabilities and containment options should they be required. The briefing officer would pull up the oil rig map and a satellite image of the area and we would move on.

I’m willing to bet the “artist” here phoned DJT’s secretary (ya, the new one) to apologize for creating a firestorm with his doodles. And I bet she said “it’s OK, POTUS sends his regards; he is glad CNN has something to chew on now…. he’s gone golfing, se ya tomorrow.”

But hey, that's just me, fun to guess eh? Sometimes paint is paint. 

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Cool.

When you write that conspiracy theory novel I would love to pen the forward and introduction. Had you followed my faltering career through 11 foreign deployments I could have provided an entire books worth of inadvertent material and comic relief resplendent with doodles drawn on official maps.

Even though I dove with the Navy, alas, I didn't qualify for that coveted sharpie... I might have it all wrong though. Maybe a Congressional inquiry and impeachment proceeding is in order here; I hear Mueller is looking for a job and he seems to be more articulate than the current Democratic front runner.

PS:

Beauty.... it now has a "gate" name (Sharpie-Gate) and has reached full conspiracy status. The comments are likely more instructive than the article though and it reminds me of the quote "thinking themselves wise, they became fools." Clearly it's a clever forgery drawn with great skill. Somewhere there is a Navy Commander being relentlessly teased by his peers who will carry the nickname Sharpie for the rest of his career.

https://torontosun.com/news/weird/sharpie-gate-trump-shows-apparently-altered-hurricane-dorian-map/wcm/e80a55ae-0c1b-4a14-a3b0-6cede1efbdff

Breaking news.... CNN has determined that it is illegal to modify an official weather product. Please keep this in mind should you choose to highlight any partial periods of a TAF. Stay safe out there.....

https://www.foxnews.com/media/cnns-don-lemon-defends-importance-of-sharpiegate-coverage-this-is-a-news-story

Edited by Wolfhunter
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 With a divide this deep, how long before the next American Revolution? With all the guns in play it won’t be pretty!

ACCC9FF1-41A4-4DE8-B54A-91ECD2380257.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee

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FWIW....the only time I see Melania with a smile on her face is when she is with Trudeau....😳

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3 hours ago, deicer said:

Now the truth is out, Donnie was so insecure, he altered the map himself

He is clearly a master forger.... it looked flawless and seamless didn't it? 

What pray tell is contained within the boundaries of his dastardly (and manifestly illegal) modification to an official map? Anything that poses a potential environmental or infrastructure threat? Anything that might be susceptible to damaging winds below defined hurricane wind limits? Anything that FEMA might have wanted to consider? Anything that might have been discussed in a contingency planning meeting?

I don't know the answer (and I'm rapidly loosing interest) but the answer might be instructive.... if you are looking for a conspiracy it might actually be what it was he seemed so concerned about there. A hurricane requires a wind speed of 74 knots, is 70 not worthy of consideration? How about 60? Maybe he has a resort, a golf course or a yacht there... fear not, CNN is on the job.

BTW, you had previously asked about my definition of crazy. Aborting babies as a climate change initiative just got added to the list and I'm considering renaming crazy to dangerous. Fifty years from now, history students will be shaking their heads and knocking down statues, politicians will be racing to apologize on live TV with tears in their eyes. I'll keep you appraised of developing crazy/stupid/dangerous as it occurs. Now, just imagine for a moment the fallout had Trump suggested aborting brown babies in poor countries as a method of reducing global warming. All coverage of the weather map would grind to a halt. And if you are wondering about my politically agnostic view of partisanship and polarization.... that be it.

https://www.foxnews.com/media/bernie-sanders-call-for-third-world-population-control-through-abortion-is-disgusting-stuart-varney

Edited by Wolfhunter

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On top of being a master forger, he has also broken another law. Highlight my emphasis.

https://www.newsweek.com/trump-hurricane-dorian-alabama-altered-map-law-1457793

If Trump Altered NOAA's Hurricane Dorian's Forecast Path to Include Alabama, He May Have Broken the Law on 'False Weather Reports'

 

s the battle between President Donald Trump and his administration's weather forecasters rumbles on over whether or not Hurricane Dorian threatens Alabama, which it does not, a new question has emerged: Did he break U.S. law by altering a map with a pen?

Trump has repeatedly insisted that Alabama is at risk from Dorian, even as the National Weather Center corrects him to say that the state will face no impact because the storm is too far east. Alabama is not in Dorian's path, though neighboring states, including Florida and Georgia, are.

The controversy over the president's misleading remarks about Dorian escalated when an image appeared of Trump in the Oval Office with a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) map showing the hurricane's path, mysteriously extended by pen.

This map was displayed during a briefing on Wednesday about Dorian. It is not clear who altered the original NOAA map, titled "Hurricane Dorian Forecast Track and Intensity," or why. Trump insisted Alabama was in the original forecast and was due to be hit "very hard."

The so-called "Sharpiegate" then erupted on social media, with Twitter users accusing President Trump of looping in Alabama himself with a pen to justify his insistence that Dorian will hurt the southern state in some way.

 

Aaron Blake, a senior political reporter at The Washington Post, noted a piece of law from 1948—18 U.S. Code § 2074 on "False weather reports"—that could mean that if anyone but an official weather forecaster altered the map, it was unlawful to do so.

"Whoever knowingly issues or publishes any counterfeit weather forecast or warning of weather conditions falsely representing such forecast or warning to have been issued or published by the Weather Bureau, United States Signal Service, or other branch of the Government service, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than ninety days, or both," the law states.

The White House did not respond immediately to Newsweek's request for comment.

On Wednesday evening, Trump shared to Twitter a forecast map dated August 28 from the South Florida Water Management District showing Dorian touching Alabama. The forecast map carries a disclaimer: "If anything on this graphic causes confusion, ignore the entire product."

"This was the originally projected path of the Hurricane in its early stages," Trump tweeted. "As you can see, almost all models predicted it to go through Florida also hitting Georgia and Alabama. I accept the Fake News apologies!"

In its latest forecast, the National Weather Service warns: "Hurricane Dorian continues to move along the Southeast US coast and is expected to approach South Carolina through Thursday. Dorian will remain a dangerous hurricane, bringing heavy rain, storm surge, damaging winds, and isolated tornadoes along and near the coasts of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and portions of southeast Virginia and the southern Chesapeake Bay through late week."

It's illegal to "knowingly issue or publish any counterfeit weather forecast or warning of weather conditions falsely representing such forecast or warning to have been issued or published by the Weather Bureau"

I doubt Trump would get in trouble, thoughhttps://t.co/uVsoMZ8XtB

— Aaron Blake (@AaronBlake) September 4, 2019

 

This was the originally projected path of the Hurricane in its early stages. As you can see, almost all models predicted it to go through Florida also hitting Georgia and Alabama. I accept the Fake News apologies! pic.twitter.com/0uCT0Qvyo6

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 4, 2019

Trump responds to #sharpiegate with an obscure map released by an obscure agency, the South Florida Water Management District, on Aug. 28. But what was the South Florida Water Management District using that day to alert the public? The National Hurricane Center map, unsharpied: https://t.co/VCIUjLxJd3 pic.twitter.com/Iy8bzNdyAK

— Robert Mackey (@RobertMackey) September 5, 2019

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Then the forum should get very quiet indeed.... most of the pilots here are equally guilty. I confess to doodling on weather maps in the briefing pack myself. Most of it was directly in front of the briefer.... he should have warned me. Navigators are even worse and should be subject to even greater sanction.... their defence will be saving paper but don't you believe it.  

As to the abortion issue, I'm willing to bet that any forum member who seeks to defend aborting brown babies in poor countries to mitigate climate change is on record here accusing me of racism for urging caution on the immigration front. This isn't even fun to watch anymore.

Edited by Wolfhunter
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On 9/4/2019 at 1:30 PM, deicer said:

Talking about false reports, President Trump is an amateur compared to our PM when it comes to "False Reports" but likely equal in "denial after the fact". 

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16 minutes ago, Marshall said:

Talking about false reports, President Trump is an amateur compared to our PM when it comes to "False Reports" but likely equal in "denial after the fact". 

There are multiple threads about our PM, only one about Trump, so why not put that there?

 

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23 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

Then the forum should get very quiet indeed.... most of the pilots here are equally guilty. I confess to doodling on weather maps in the briefing pack myself. Most of it was directly in front of the briefer.... he should have warned me. Navigators are even worse and should be subject to even greater sanction.... their defence will be saving paper but don't you believe it.  

 

How can you call making notes on a map operationally equivalent to putting out a map that is an official forecast?  Did you ever accept scribbled notes on your weather briefing as 'official'?

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24 minutes ago, deicer said:

Did you ever accept scribbled notes on your weather briefing as 'official'?

Never, I would have reported it immediately. OK, actually it happened fairly regularly especially operationally but they always tried to print legibly. Back in the day, I remember writing FTs (remember them) on OHPs for morning briefs.  

Given all of the resources at his disposal do you suppose that is the best forgery he could come up with? DJT isn't a forecaster, neither am I, and this boarders on insane.... I quit.

Edited by Wolfhunter
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17 hours ago, deicer said:

There are multiple threads about our PM, only one about Trump, so why not put that there?

 

Because I can..... 😀😀 Because I thought it was a valid comparison.  

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10 hours ago, Marshall said:

boring and repetitious 

Then I guess you won't like the picture of the new White House dog....

 

sharpei.jpg

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On a related note...

Here's an interesting read on the flaws in the American system.

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/09/electoral-college-terrible/597589

The Electoral College Was Terrible From the Start

It’s doubtful even Alexander Hamilton believed what he was selling in “Federalist No. 68.”

Before we get to the Electoral College, can we talk about Alexander Hamilton?

As a political figure, Hamilton was volatile, mercurial, choleric, vindictive, conniving, disloyal, and incontinent; those personal flaws eventually led to his death in a duel with Aaron Burr. We remember him because he was also smart, creative, dashing, and decisive. And if you’d had a case in front of a New York court, he’d have been the lawyer to hire. Brilliant doesn’t do justice to his advocacy skills.

But an advocate is what he was. If he were a car salesman today, he could convince you that you really don’t want the backup camera in your family minivan, because this baby here knows not to back into walls.

It’s in that context that we should read his panegyric, from “Federalist No. 68,” to the “mode of appointment of the chief magistrate of the United States” by the electors, a “small number of persons, selected by their fellow-citizens from the general mass, [who] will be most likely to possess the information and discernment requisite to such complicated investigations.” The electors, he assured us, will be “men most capable of analyzing the qualities adapted to the station, and acting under circumstances favorable to deliberation, and to a judicious combination of all the reasons and inducements which were proper to govern their choice.”

I love The Federalist. It is like a particularly well-done brochure for a Las Vegas timeshare, written to sell more than to inform. Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay had one job: to ensure that the draft Constitution was ratified. The alternative, to these patriots, was disaster—the division of the new nation into hostile confederacies, and possibly the transformation of some or all of the states into clients of the European powers. There was no chance of a do-over; it was this Constitution or nothing. For this reason, The Federalist insists that every word, every comma, of the Constitution added up to the best of all possible rules in the best of all possible worlds.

Garrett Epps: ‘The Supreme Court is not well. And the people know it.’

However, the authors knew the document’s flaws. When Madison sent a copy to Thomas Jefferson, Jefferson discreetly replied: “In some parts it is discoverable that the author means only to say what may be best said in defense of opinions in which he did not concur.”

 

As long as George Washington was on the ballot, the electoral system worked fine. But when Washington retired in 1796, it hobbled his successor, John Adams. The original Constitution made the electoral-vote runner-up the vice president—Adams’s defeated opponent, Thomas Jefferson. Poor, gallant Adams could have used a friend at No. 2 but instead got a cunning foe. In the next election, in 1800, the system turned on Jefferson; because he and his running mate, Aaron Burr, got the same number of electoral votes, the election went to the House of Representatives, leading to 35 ballots over seven days—and very nearly to civil violence by outraged Jefferson supporters.

After that debacle, Congress proposed the Twelfth Amendment, ratified in 1804. It requires electors to vote for one president and one vice president. But it didn’t fix the real flaw: the electoral system is grossly undemocratic and devised in large part as a protection for slave states, which feared being outvoted in a popular-vote system. In fact, after Adams, what contemporaries called “the slave seats” ensured the dominance of slave-master presidents for the next quarter century. Then, in 1824, it gave us the first president to lose the popular vote, the unfortunate John Quincy Adams.

 

In 1876, the system almost restarted the Civil War; a Republican-dominated “electoral commission” awarded a one-vote victory to the popular-vote loser, “His Fraudulency” Rutherford B. Hayes. In 1888, electors gave us another loser president, the forgettable Benjamin Harrison. More recently, in 2000 and 2016, the system produced popular-vote losers who rank among the worst presidents in American history. The misfire in 2016 was especially painful, in part because the beneficiary, Donald Trump, was so plainly unfit for office and in part because Hillary Clinton won the popular vote by nearly 3 million votes, the largest margin of any electoral-college loser in history.

Turns out the U.S. really needed that backup camera; without it, “we the people” are still backing into walls. But so smooth was that handsome salesman that generations of Americans keep insisting everything is fine.

In fact, between the 2016 election on November 8 and the scheduled electoral vote on December 19, a number of commentators assured Americans that it was for moments like this that the Founders had so wisely decided against a backup camera. The idea, they said, was that electors were to block unfit candidates. They could break their pledges to vote for their state’s winner, scatter enough votes that neither candidate would get a majority, and throw the election to the House, where high-minded lawmakers would surely choose someone other than Donald Trump. These mythical electors were called “Hamilton electors,” and the language of “Federalist No. 68” was deemed the “true” meaning of Article II of the Constitution.

 

In Colorado, which Clinton carried, one elector tried to vote for Ohio Governor John Kasich instead of Hillary Clinton; state officials discarded the vote, removed the elector, and referred him for prosecution on state charges. In Washington, three Clinton electors voted for Colin Powell and one for the Native American activist Faith Spotted Eagle. Under state law, their votes were recorded, but the secretary of state fined each elector $1,000 for violating the Washington elector-pledge law.

In May, the Washington State supreme court upheld the fines, reasoning that “the Constitution does not limit a state’s authority in adding requirements to presidential electors, indeed, it gives to the states absolute authority in the manner of appointing electors.” In August, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit issued a contrary decision, holding that Colorado’s actions violated the federal Constitution because

While the Constitution grants the states plenary power to appoint their electors, it does not provide the states the power to interfere once voting begins, to remove an elector, to direct the other electors to disregard the removed elector’s vote, or to appoint a new elector to cast a replacement vote. In the absence of such a delegation, the states lack such power.

Read: The electoral college was meant to stop men like Trump from being president

 

I think the Tenth Circuit got it right. Electors aren’t state officials; precisely because they are such odd figures, staying close to the text of the Constitution is best. The text doesn’t tell us what an elector is (though we know he or she can’t hold any other federal office); it does tell us what states can do (control how electors are selected)—but it does not grant states any power after that. There is no context for any unwritten powers. Beyond the text is only chaos.

And that leads us to my problem with “Hamilton electors.” First, as noted above, I don’t think Hamilton believed the high popalorum he was selling in “Federalist No. 68,” and if he did, he was wrong. The Princeton political scientist Keith E. Whittington recently demonstrated that electors have more or less always functioned as party agents, not independent figures. I cannot imagine that any voter in 2016 went to the polls eager to give some unnamed fellow citizen a free choice among Clinton, Trump, Bernie Sanders, Kasich, Ron Paul, Powell, and Faith Spotted Eagle.

When Trump won the electoral contest, the republic was in danger. Would it have been saved by an Electoral College that sabotaged or reversed the result? Citizens should support such an electoral démarche, I think, only if they would also support a military coup to block Trump. Either alternative would inflict near-mortal damage on our system of elections.

Meanwhile, the residue of the Hamilton idea is a system more, not less, prone to misfiring. In the event of a near-tie next year, I can imagine that a losing candidate, or powerful forces backing him or her, would use bribery, threats, violence, and blackmail to try to flip one or two electors. The Constitution should not be read to empower such corruption, or to open the door to such chaos.

The electoral system is a disaster; those concerned with its dangers would do better to support the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, under which states bind their electors to vote for the popular-vote winner. That has its own risks—a rogue legislature might try to violate its pledge. But they pale beside the Hamilton alternative.

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Those in rural ridings could stay home, save gas and save the planet. All you need is New York, California, Florida and presto. And no one in rural districts believes for one second that anything of substance will come out of the pockets of that elusive 1% the left has been talking about for the last 45 years. They know from previous experience who pays for what: 

https://www.foxnews.com/us/billionaire-carl-icahn-moving-business-from-ny-to-florida-for-lower-taxes-report

Cities (large urban centres like all of Florida) will beat the snot out of rural dwellers without mercy until the lights go out and their debit cards, cell phones and smart cars don't work.... Hurricane Dorian was a wakeup call for lots of urban dwellers; Y'all actually need country folk for a few things and most of those things only become apparent during hurricanes and prolonged power failures. 

Who needs a 6.0 Ltr 4x4 with an 8000W generator on it, we should tax it..... make the rich pay.

So, in rural Nova Scotia, what does a hurricane, a tornado and a red neck divorce all have in common?

-

-

-

-

-

Somebody loses a trailer.

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Here’s Why Zero People Showed Up To The ‘Impeach Trump’ Event

And then, and then, and then, and then: There was never any argument for impeachment. The Left knows this, and the rank-and-file knows this, and they're sick of it. Look, it's not that the Left doesn't want to impeach Trump. It's just, you know, you got to put on your pants in the morning, and walk out the door, you got to take the bus, you've got to go over to the Capitol, you gotta hold up the signs, 'Impeach Trump.' They don't believe it anymore because it's not going to happen. It is not going to happen. The anti-Trump rhetoric from the mainstream media and Democratic candidates is still in a fever pitch, but it doesn't correspond to reality.

Compare the Resistance, the Trump Resistance, to the Tea Party. Think about these two things: Tea Party 2010, even a little bit before that, totally legitimate movement, rose up in opposition to a massively unpopular law called Obamacare, [which] tried to [overtake] a sixth of the economy, that took away Americans' doctors, that made prices go up — the quality of care decrease — that unconstitutionally forced Americans to buy a private product from the federal level. Also, the Tea Party was running against a terrible economy. Barack Obama comes in [during] a recession sure, but then because of his awful economic policies there was no recovery. Slowest recovery in history.

They also, in the Tea Party, were running against a very unpopular corporate bailout. So the big banks, I mean there were several bailouts but there was a bailout of the banks, then there was the unpopular stimulus plan. The banks, in part, get us into this mess and then what do we do? The federal government uses our tax dollars to bail them out. There was this slush-fund stimulus package that didn't bring with it any jobs. They also were running against expanded wars in Middle East. Barack Obama expanded wars in the Middle East almost immediately after he got elected. And what did the Tea Party do? They had these legitimate grievances — they were very specific, they were very particular. They organized, they rallied their candidates, and they won 1000 seats around the country. That's impressive.

The thing I always noticed about Tea Party rallies, I went to a number of them ... I was working on campaigns at the time ... The Tea Party would show up, and they'd leave their rallies, and the place looks cleaner than it did before they got there. You know they were very well behaved. Say whatever you will about the ideology of the Tea Party, which I think was really positive for the country. But they were well behaved. They were serious people. Compare that to the Resistance.

The Resistance is a bunch of aggrieved ex-hippies and blue-haired feminists who don't like Trump's mean tweets. That's it. What are they running against? Are they running against some unpopular law? What's the unpopular law. Tax cuts? Yeah, we need to sweep the country because Trump let us keep more of our money! I don't think so. Is it the economy? No, the economy's doing great. Is it wars in the Middle East? If anything, President Trump has curtailed wars in the Middle East. They're not running against anything real.

 
 
 

 

 

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Now appears the Chinese are going to be the adult in the room.  That, and I believe they are showing off that they are now far ahead of the U.S. in technological advancement.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeanbaptiste/2019/09/12/huawei-ceo-reportedly-offers-to-license-5g-technology-stack-to-american-companies-in-peace-offer-to-trump/#1f4c6c1d5324

Huawei CEO Reportedly Offers To License 5G Technology To American Companies In Peace Offer To Trump

 

Correction: This post has been updated to clarify CEO Zhengfei Ren's comments reported in the New York Times. 

Zhengfei Ren, the CEO and founder of Huawei offered an olive branch to the Trump administration: License the Chinese telecommunications giant's 5G technology to American companies, with the caveat that the U.S. government "“the U.S. side has to accept us at some level for that to happen.” Currently, the use of Huawei equipment is banned from U.S. networks over concerns that it could be used by the Chinese government as a method to spy or disrupt telecom systems.

The offer, which was reported earlier this week by New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, would essentially allow the U.S. to finally get in the race for 5G supremacy which is now dominated by Chinese firms Huawei and ZTE, Ericsson of Sweden and Nokia from Finland. Note: Whether

"Huawei is open to sharing our 5G technologies and techniques with U.S. companies, so that they can build up their own 5G industry. That would create a balanced situation between China, the U.S. and Europe,” told Ren to the newspaper.

 

 

I reached out to Huawei's communications team who confirmed Ren's offer.

Moreover, Ren added that the U.S. companies would be allowed to modify as they see fit the software code used to run any of Huawei's 5G  equipment or even change it and use their own. Though this does not guarantee security against back doors, the implication is that this should allay fears that the Chinese company might be able to access these licensed American made 5G telecommunications gears to spy for the Chinese government. Further, the Chinese government would have to approve the deal.

Today In: Innovation

Ren added that the American licensees will be able to sell their 5G equipment based on Huawei's intellectual property anywhere in the world, except in China.

Atherton Research Insights

PROMOTED

 
 
 

The CEO's offer of licensing Huawei's crown jewels—5G will be the core technology used in all of the world's telecommunications infrastructure for at least the next decade—came as a shock, both outside but also inside the world's largest maker of 5G networking equipment.

Our sources close to the firm confirmed to us that Ren's announcement was news to the entire company, headquartered in Shenzhen, China.

On the technology side—although there are many political ramifications to this, including the fact that the Chinese government might not like to see the most valuable assets of its most valuable tech company land in U.S. hands, my goal here is to discuss the impact this olive branch will have on the technology sector— this could be the one-time opportunity to make the U.S. a telecommunications powerhouse again and get back and win the 5G race.

Today, there is no American 5G equipment maker.

Lucent, which used to be part of A&T, was the last U.S. manufacturer of telecommunications equipment and is now part of Nokia, after the Finnish company completed the acquisition of Alcatel-Lucent three years ago, on November 2016.

And Qualcomm is only making 5G modems and antennas for smartphones and is not building any telecommunications equipment.

Although a company like Cisco—which already competes with Huawei in the enterprise and service provider networking market—would be a great candidate for this deal, smaller equipment makers including Arista, Juniper or a Silicon Valley startup could grab this opportunity to build the next U.S. telecommunications giant that could compete and win against Ericsson, Nokia and Huawei!

An offer definitely worth considering.

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