28 May 2016 - Mark your calendar!


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7 minutes ago, seeker said:

Ahhh, so you don't think it's going to happen then?

Gooooogle it and pick  a date...The "future tellers" have been wrong for years...here is one example, some of the dire warnings go back 5 years or more.

 

Obama Knows That The USA Dollar Will Collapse in 2014 – Thus the USA Will Collapse in 2014 and FEMA/DHS is Preparing – The Only Hope to Delay Collapse is War – Here we Explain Exactly Why the Dollar Will Collapse in 2014

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I think the prediction you quoted may have been correct Kip?

If the performance of the currency is considered after 01/01/14, negative interest rates for example, it's hard to claim that the dollar did not collapse. 

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2 hours ago, ckl said:

The 31 Jan 2016 date is only  when it was reposted. All of the charts, the price of gas, the price of gold are all dated.

OK, I see.  Still lots of views in the time since it's been re-posted.  I assume the view count doesn't carry-over if a video is re-posted.  Anyway, just thought it was interesting, because of the topic and also because the date for this, supposedly, to happen was so specific. 

Much ado about nothing, apparently - carry on then.

 

 

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I am not concerned because the world ended in 2012....Oh wait...

The other thing is that if the world was predicted to end in 2012, why are there any predictions at all about a financial collapse in 2016.

hmmmmmm

 

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OK, so now that we've determined the financial world won't end next month let me pose another question.  Over the years I've contemplated the following question/scenarios;

I'm the sort of person who like to be prepared for unexpected situations.  Being a father and husband I naturally want to provide for my family whatever happens.  On a very basic level I, of course, keep flashlights, batteries and food on hand in case we have a storm or the power goes out.  Since I've experienced some long duration interruptions to power (we live outside the city) I have a generator and a couple of jerrycans of fuel.  Of course we have the BBQ and I always keep an extra bottle of propane (have two - one in use and one full spare).  We have a woodstove which will heat the house and could also be used for cooking.  I also have a large deep-cycle battery that I keep charged and a pure-sine inverter to power/charge all the small electronic devices.  Along with some other preparations such as building on a hill so no flood worries for us and having a 4-wheel drive vehicle in case of big snow storm or road getting washed out I'm confident that we're self-sufficient for maybe as much as a few weeks.

Now, the video above talks about buying physical gold and silver in case the dollar collapses so that gets me wondering about what a person could do or should do to prepare for things beyond a snow storm or ice storm type event.  Let's say you did believe that the financial system might collapse or massive inflation might occur - what is the best thing to have as a store of value instead of cash, is it gold coins, silver coins, what?  Obviously if it's an end of civilization/Mad Max scenario the roving gangs will just roll through and take everything you have anyway so let's just imagine something more controlled; massive inflation, large scale unemployment but a somewhat normal state to society in general.  Having some of your wealth on hand in gold coins seems like a good idea at first glance but there's some big assumptions you need to swallow.  Will there be any ability to trade gold for what you want/need such as fuel, food, etc.  I think not.  If I had a basement full of bags of rice would I be willing to trade for gold coins - how do I know it's real, what's a fair exchange rate, will I be able to trade the gold for something I need later? 

I've gone down this path a few times and in the end it always becomes an exercise in trying to predict, fairly specifically, what exactly has failed in the world and more precisely what that will mean as far as costs and shortages of basic necessities.  For example if there was some sort of chemical spill down the road the most valuable thing you could have might be a self contained breathing apparatus and if you had an extra one it would be very easy to trade for something else.  If there was some sort of deadly flu loose in the world the most valuable thing might be doses of Tamiflu - you could become extremely wealthy if you had stocked up on that before hand meanwhile the bags of rice or batteries wouldn't change in value at all.  That's the problem, the thing that becomes valuable is the thing that other people can't get easily so you need to correctly predict what that thing is.  Difficult to do.

Edited by seeker
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Maybe someone is trying to drive up the price of gold?

http://www.cnbc.com/id/38487460

"Fear-Mongering and Conflicts of Interest 

Fear-mongering by those who, like Fox News host Glenn Beck, have lucrative deals with gold vendors has been causing angst about conflicts of interest for months. But reports of customers getting put into investments that lose a third of their value upon purchase are causing a new sense of alarm."

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Wow:eek: !! Sorta a doomsday scenario there:o.

FWIW, in my entire life I have never contemplated anything  like you have posted and by that I mean food vs gold and pretty much everything else you have written.. In an emergency I do have a flash-light , a few candles and I think we have a box of matches around here somewhere or an extra BBQ lighter..Oh yes, a Honda 2000 portable genset, (off the boat), but only during the winter when we are home.....(will keep the fridges and freezers going) and as you can see that stuff would only  be used for a power failure

Personally, I think there are bigger things to worry about than an apocalypse so I really don't put much thought into the world becoming Mad Max's theatre or that perhaps we will all live in a zombie nation...who knows  ???

Each to his own...... but I really think that visualizing all the issues you allude to would make my day very very depressing and again, personally, I don't think that way, never have, and don't want to...........I live by the motto......

Live each day to the fullest, as if it is your last day on earth because,, some day it will be.

Good luck:thumbup:

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The Boy Scout motto requires one to 'be prepared'.

Anything requiring a liquid, or a volatile gas as fuel is a temporary convenience at best and the operation of machinery will provide notice to others that you have the kind of stuff they want and are searching for.

Food & medical supplies, water purification, an over stock of personal toiletries and a sound defensive strategy that can carry you for 6 months, or longer will serve your purpose.

And don't let anyone know that you're a 'prepper' either as it's the unprepared that will come to relieve you of your stores by force to preserve their butts.

   

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1 hour ago, Kip Powick said:

Wow:eek: !! Sorta a doomsday scenario there:o.

FWIW, in my entire life I have never contemplated anything  like you have posted and by that I mean food vs gold and pretty much everything else you have written.. In an emergency I do have a flash-light , a few candles and I think we have a box of matches around here somewhere or an extra BBQ lighter..Oh yes, a Honda 2000 portable genset, (off the boat), but only during the winter when we are home.....(will keep the fridges and freezers going) and as you can see that stuff would only  be used for a power failure

Personally, I think there are bigger things to worry about than an apocalypse so I really don't put much thought into the world becoming Mad Max's theatre or that perhaps we will all live in a zombie nation...who knows  ???

Each to his own...... but I really think that visualizing all the issues you allude to would make my day very very depressing and again, personally, I don't think that way, never have, and don't want to...........I live by the motto......

Live each day to the fullest, as if it is your last day on earth because,, some day it will be.

Good luck:thumbup:

I said both too little and too much.  I grew up on a farm and from a young age saw the value in self reliance.  Being a father, and having lived through a week long no-power weather event, naturally lead me to making the small preparations I have - the generator, extra gas for the BBQ, etc.  I don't have a basement full of food, gold coins or stash of weapons and am in no way a prepper.  I also don't sit around thinking of doomsday scenarios.  I only was reminded and motivated to post the above based on that video I stumbled across recently and it's suggestion that everyone should have some gold coins for when the dollar collapses.  My point, which you seemed to have missed (or which I didn't explain well enough), is that it's impossible to prepare for some future event because you can't predict what the event will be and therefore any effort you make to acquire "stuff" in preparation will likely be wasted since you can't predict what stuff you will need. 

If someone were really and truly concerned about being prepared for some bleak future the most valuable thing you could posses would be a skill such as being able to hunt or fish or grow vegetables or build a log cabin.  I'm not motivated to learn to do any of those things so I guess I'm not truly concerned. 

Edited by seeker
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Seeker

If someone were really and truly concerned about being prepared for some bleak future the most valuable thing you could posses would be a skill such as being able to hunt or fish or grow vegetables or build a log cabin.  I'm not motivated to learn to do any of those things so I guess I'm not truly concerned

 

You said you grew up on a farm yet you didn't do those things??? I was raised on a farm and did all of those things, fished in the creek that ran through the back 50, also hunted ducks and pheasants in the same area. Hunted deer in the mountains that bordered the farm and naturally grew many of our own vegetables,  Log Cabin?? Well,...no....but we built a damned sturdy log  barn and I still have a 16 x 28 photo of that barn as it slowly fell into disrepair as the decades passed.

My kids are all adults now but I taught them fishing, hunting, skating, and swimming...things I think you have to know being a resident of Canada.

My kids are all city dwellers now but they, as parents, did follow through with two of my teachings....they ensured their young kids could skate and swim. They also ensure they are fully aware of the awesome beauty of the outside..... and wilderness in Canada. I have taught the little ones to fish and just gave my tackle box to two of the girls.

I understand that you may not be concerned about a 'dismal' future but I would encourage you  give something 'different' a try....if you have the time;).

And finally, as far as I am concerned, it is never too late to teach someone almost anything and personally I think it is a bad day if I don't hear music...... and don't learn something new.( just learned how to "port forward' my security cameras to a cell phone app.:thumbup: )

 

Have a nice weekend.....

 

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Geez Kip, are you being intentionally contrary?  Yes, I have hunted.  I've built my share of decks, docks, sheds, basements so I know which end of the hammer to hold.  I've planted a few vegetable gardens and I've fished in the Pacific, the Atlantic, the Arctic, the territories, NW Ontario, northern Manitoba, northern Sask.  I can downhill ski, cross-country ski, skate, snowshoe (there's one you missed), operate a compass and I'm even pretty good with a boomerang.  What I said was that having a skill is more important than having a particular item when trying to prepare for an unknown future event.  Being able to take your grandkids out on a sunny Sunday afternoon fishing is not a skill.  I'm talking about being able to go out every day of the year and bring back fish - knowing that when the ice goes out where the trout will be, knowing where the fish will be on a cloudy day in the morning, when and where and how to maximize your chances of bringing back something.  The same goes for hunting - just because you shot a deer once 50 years ago does not equate to being able to provide reliably for your family and just because you grew some zucchini one summer does not necessarily make you a person who could earn an income from it.

This has the potential to spiral into never-ending discussion so let me make an analogy instead;  think of it as if you were about to go on an extended cruise in your boat - you need to have a toolbox, so you throw in the standard items; wrenches, pliers, screwdrivers.  Then you start thinking about possible scenarios; maybe a leaky hose - so you bring hose clamps and duct tape, maybe you get a leak in the oil pan or outdrive so you bring spare engine oil and extra gear oil, maybe an extra drive belt for the alternator and a piece of 2x4 to use as a lever to re-tension it when you replace the broken one.  This is not meant to be an inclusive list so don't reply saying I forgot "X" and therefore should have remembered to bring metric allen wrenches!  The just of this is that you are trying to prepare for some future event without knowing what it is or even if it will happen at all.  You bring the tools and spares you might need but you can't bring everything and you can't prepare for every eventuality.  Same goes with some future societal event; maybe there's a dollar collapse and having some gold would help, maybe there's some food shortage and having a basement stock would be useful but you don't know what will happen or even if anything will happen at all. 

If you think through various scenarios to their logical conclusion you will find that knowledge and skills are the ultimate source of value.  You can have the tools and spares but if you don't know how to diagnose the failed starter solenoid and what to do about it you're dead in the water.

I am posting this because of the video above - the guy predicts that the US dollar might collapse and suggests that having gold or silver will save you.  I'm saying that it's impossible to predict what might happen in the future and how to prepare for it and that, in the end, having a skill (knowledge) will always trump having something physical.  If a person truly was concerned about the dollar collapsing simply replacing dollars with gold coins is not nearly enough to ensure your security and well-being.

Oh, and before you reply, I don't sit around obsessing about end-of-the-world scenarios, my life is not unhappy and I do learn stuff all the time.

I hope you're having/had a good weekend as well.

Edited by seeker
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Geez...No.... I am not being contrary..:huh:..here, again is what you posted...how am I supposed to take that dialogue ?:o

 

 the most valuable thing you could posses would be a skill such as being able to hunt or fish or grow vegetables or build a log cabin.  I'm not motivated to learn to do any of those things

As we both know, postings  can get misconstrued and sometimes are left open to interpretation ........based on the lengthy dialogue in your last post I will assume that the sentence in red above, is NOT what you actually meant to impart.

Hopefully you can see how I  interpreted those two sentences...........no harm ..no foul:lol:

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Yes, I see.  My assumption was that you would understand what I said within the context of our discussion.  I said:

"If someone were really and truly concerned about being prepared for some bleak future the most valuable thing you could posses would be a skill such as being able to hunt or fish or grow vegetables or build a log cabin. " 

So, referring to a "skill" within the defined parameters of "some bleak future" was intended to refer to a high level of proficiency - high enough to be marketable/tradeable/life-sustaining.  Then I said:

"I'm not motivated to learn to do any of those things so I guess I'm not truly concerned. " 

Within the same context, this was intended to mean that I am not motivated to learn these things to an expert level of proficiency.

Your reply came across like; "What kind of pathetic person can't fish.  My kids can fish, you should learn more stuff!"  Hence my reply this morning.

So, my apologies for not writing clearer and for misinterpreting your reply, Kip.  :)

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